Investing in precious metals 101

Tag Archives: Exponential Growth

  • Insider
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    Facing Reality

    Only those willing to see things as they are will prosper
    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, January 25, 2019, 6:19 PM

    28

    Executive Summary

    • We are fighting (i.e. losing against) exponential functions on multiple fronts
    • Social unrest (e.g. Yellow Vests) is a spreading symptom that collapse is accelerating
    • Which path will collapse take?
    • Preparing for the future of “Less”

    If you have not yet read Part 1: Collapse Is Already Here, available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

    The reason I write and speak and sometimes travel to talk about The Three E’s – the Economy, energy and Environment – is because I hope to reach those who are ready to listen…and to then act.

    Typically, I find that I am reaching people with a certain level of economic and professional success in their lives (many doctors, engineers, architects and lawyers in my audience) and who have the entirely-too-rare ability to face difficult information square on.

    One of the more important principles concerns exponential growth, which has a nasty habit of speeding up towards the end.  Those numerate among us grasp the serious implications of exponential growth quickly and easily. The rest of us have to work a lot harder to understand, which is why most of the masses never do.

    In the world of finance, exponential (or parabolic) growth always ends badly for the last investors in. Just ask those who bought into dot-Com stocks or Bitcoin near the highs.

    However, where any of today's inflated prices go from here is not subject to traditional analysis.  Everything depends on the actions that the central banks will take from here.  Will they print more?  Undoubtedly. 

    How much more suppression of the price of gold will the authorities demand?  As much as necessary to keep unwanted attention off of their policy errors.

    Looks, what I’ve learned from investing is(…)

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  • Podcast

    Tim Jackson: The High Price Of Growth

    A finite planet cannot sustain infinite economic growth
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, October 16, 2017, 7:31 PM

    23

    Modern society is addicted to and engineered for perpetual economic growth.

    Now, a fourth-grader can tell you that nothing can grow forever, especially if you have finite resources. But that simple realization is eluding today's central planners, despite multiplying evidence that growth is becoming harder and harder to come by.

    This week's podcast guest is Professor Tim Jackson, sustainability advisor for the UK government, professor of sustainable development at the University of Surrey and Director of CUSP. Tim is also a full member of the Club of Rome.

    He explains why the exponential growth rates of today's economies, and their associated rates of resource extraction/consumption, will not be able to continue for much longer — and why a pursuit of "prosperity" (defined much more broadly than simple consumerism) is a much healthier goal for humanity.

     

     

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  • Blog
    Peak Prosperity

    What Should I Do? – Crash Course Chapter 26

    Take prudent steps NOW, while there's still time
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, January 10, 2015, 3:43 PM

    6

    If there’s one message to take away from this newly-updated Crash Course video series, it’s this:  It’s time for you to become more resilient and more engaged. Things are changing quickly and nobody knows how much time we have before the next economic, ecological or energy related crisis erupts.  Nobody knows when, but we do have a pretty good idea of what is coming.

    And it is within your control to enter the coming future with a higher degree of security, prosperity and fulfillment than you enjoy now.

     

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  • Blog
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    Future Shock – Crash Course Chapter 25

    The unsustainable often ends abruptly
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, December 27, 2014, 3:24 AM

    23

    Chapter 25 of the Crash Course is now publicly available and ready for watching below.

    Here at the penultimate chapter of The Crash Course, everything we've learned comes together into a single narrow range of time we'll call the twenty-teens. 

    What this chapter offers is a comprehensive view of how all of our problems are actually interrelated and need to be viewed as such, or solutions will continue to elude us.

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  • Blog
    National Archives and Records Administration (NARA)

    The Environment: Depleting Resources – Crash Course Chapter 23

    Why scarcity will define the future
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, November 28, 2014, 7:44 PM

    3

    The bottom line is this: we, as a species, all over the globe, have already mined the richest ores, found the easiest energy sources, and farmed the richest soils that our Environment has to offer.

    We have taken several hundreds of millions of years of natural ore body, fossil energy deposition, aquifer accumulation, soil creation, and animal population growth — and largely burned through them in the few years since oil was discovered. It is safe to say that in human terms, once these are gone, man, they’re gone.

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  • Blog
    Peak Prosperity

    Compounding Is The Problem: Crash Course Chapter 4

    By the time the problem is visible, it can't be avoided
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, July 11, 2014, 4:32 PM

    3

    Chapter 4 of the Crash Course is now publicly available. It includes Chris' famous "magic eye dropper" example of how the compounding nature of exponential systems speeds up over time, often in ways very non-intuitive to the human mind.

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  • Insider

    Japan Is Struggling

    More data on my favorite black swan candidate for 2012
    by Chris Martenson

    Saturday, July 28, 2012, 1:53 AM

    10

    In a prior piece this year, I proclaimed Japan to be my favored candidate to be the black swan of 2012. By this I mean that a financial accident in Japan that would create massive havoc in the world markets seems even more likely to me than something originating in Europe.

    The reason is precisely because all eyes (and efforts) are focused on Europe, leaving Japan out of focus and unattended, so to speak. This is practically a requirement for a crisis spot; crises never seem to arise in the place everybody is already watching. Japan is nicely out of focus and therefore a good place for us to keep our eyes trained upon.

    In the most recent podcast with Mish, we discussed the fact that Japan had recently posted its largest first half trade deficit in history. Then Mish asked if Japan's current account had slipped into negative territory yet, as that event will accelerate the pace at which Japan's looming structural insolvency will arrive.

    While discussing the current account, a normally obscure economic term, seems a bit wonkish, it is really quite important. So let's start there, with a definition as a refresher for myself and perhaps an introduction for others.

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