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    • Tue, Feb 22, 2011 - 06:20am

      #7

      Travlin

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      earthwise wrote:I find it

    [quote=earthwise]

    I find it difficult to envision a shadow government whose sphere of influence stops at the border. American influence certainly doesn’t, and therefore any group who exercises undue influence would by necessity be a global entity. TR’s quote above describes “an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people”. Wouldn’t such an entity that had “no allegiance” be rightly considered international, even global? That is the puzzle piece and the “gravitational pull” that I referred to above.

    [/quote]

    Earthwise

    Yes, you are absolutely right, the influence of some is global, and US influence certainly is, so my “domestic” remark was too narrow in focus.  However, I don’t think the moderators will call this a Global Conspiracy Theory, if you are still concerned about that.  I recently started a thread on the effects of global corporations on the US and the world that you may have missed, and they had no objection.  https://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/after-destroying-us-middle-class-how-will-us-corporations-survive/51551  We’ve also had recent threads discussing corporatocracy, and the Davos and Bladensburg (spelling?) conferences where the rich and powerful gather to figure out how to shape the future of the world.

    So the question is what are you thinking about this “gravitational pull”  It seems like a critical element to me.  I haven’t studied this much and I’m interested in your thoughts, or anyone else’s.  Or — There was a young lady from Locke, who was naughty and pulled up her … Wink

    Travlin 

    • Tue, Feb 22, 2011 - 12:33am

      #8

      Travlin

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      Hi Pinecarr I appreciate

    Hi Pinecarr

    I appreciate your comments.  I had to keep reading Lights Out every night too.  Like I said, the guy is a good storyteller, and it is worth reading for those of us interested in the subject.  I agree that Orlov and Ferfal are good sources to check out.

    Regarding Patriots; James Wesley Rawles has become one of the grand old men of the survivalist movement.  It is no surprise that his book centers on a group of couples that have prepped for years and have a retreat in northern Idaho.  In that sense it is less realistic and helpful to the situations most of us face.  It has been described as a survival manual disguised as a novel, and it is full of expert information by a man who has been at this a very long time.  I enjoyed reading it much more than Lights Out.  His web site is well regarded and contains many guest posts with good info. http://www.survivalblog.com/

    I appreciate your many thoughtful posts.  I’m curious about your background.  You joined this site five months before the crash, and you’re about the earliest member still here.  What was this site like then, especially the forums?  How did you find it?  What lead you to the search,  because you were definitely ahead of the curve?

    Travlin 

    • Mon, Feb 21, 2011 - 06:07am

      #6

      Travlin

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      Lights Out critiqueI read

    Lights Out critique

    I read this last month.  Crawford is a good storyteller and lousy writer.  His plot was exciting and I felt compelled to pick it up every night to see how events developed. However, his prose bogged down with way too much administrative detail, like exactly who was going to ride in each vehicle and what everyone was going to do for the day, etc. without advancing the plot.  There were many long passages where the author described what was happening instead of letting the characters act it out.  Many characters were not believable, and his wife and marriage were just weird.  Karate man was too much of a hero to be believable, and the action sometimes degenerated into a para-military wet dream.  In Crawford’s defense, these are common flaws of first novels.  A good editor would have deleted 1/3 of the book and improved it greatly.

    I agree that the book was worth wading through to learn about possible scenarios and how to deal with them.  I did learn a few things, but some parts were just unbelievable.  A subdivision of fifty families would have much more divisiveness and rancor.  Most of the time it seemed that only a few people were doing all the work, while the majority just sat at home.  There was no way they could all feed themselves by planting gardens in August, even in Texas.  Sewage was not even mentioned until one of the late chapters.  All the kids had to spend all day in school when they didn’t even know how they were going to survive.  The main characters had the only working vehicles and drove all around the countryside getting in gun battles, when in reality it would take all their time just to make a living.  I could go on.  There were a lot of holes in what it would take to actually survive.

    The interplay with the sheriff, the National Guard, and FEMA gave me useful things to consider, and did seem plausible to me.  Some characters got killed, but casualties for the good guys were unbelievable low.  No one suffered unrelieved agony, or was crippled for life.  The after effects of witnessing or causing violent death were simply ignored for the most part.  The story of the trek of his brother’s family was good and believable.

    Altogether it was a very mixed bag with redeeming qualities for people interested in the subject.  I found Patriots, by James Wesley Rawles, much better on all accounts, though it shared some of the same flaws.

    Travlin 

    • Mon, Feb 21, 2011 - 04:53am

      #2

      Travlin

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      DanrootThe Republicans lost

    Danroot

    The Republicans lost a lot of voters when they did this in the 90s.  I think they know better than to try that again.  As far as preps, the last time it was a no big deal for most people as I remember.

    Travlin 

    • Mon, Feb 21, 2011 - 04:45am

      #4

      Travlin

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      bluestone wrote:I clearly

    [quote=bluestone]

    I clearly see the need for hiding at least a portion of my stored food.  It would be a backup plan in case my home is ransacked.  What alternative hiding places do I have?  Can I bury some food underground in 5 gallon containers?  

    [/quote]

    Bluestone

    A lot depends on your climate.  That buried food would be hard to get to under a snow bank with the ground frozen solid down to three feet.  Then there is the question of your container seals surviving the expansion and contraction from temperature changes, which also can spoil your food as it freezes and thaws.  Water leakage would be an issue.  You should consider a rented storage space.  Not cheap, but might be worth it as insurance.  Supplies at a bug out location would be even more vulnerable to theft unless you were there.  And you wouldn’t know they were gone until you arrived.  Having supplies in more than one location is an important issue

    Travlin 

    • Mon, Feb 21, 2011 - 02:19am

      #5

      Travlin

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      Dis we just discover sex?

    [quote=earthwise]

    [quote=Travlin]

    The war for control of our economy is not new.  This quote is over 100 years old.

    [quote=President Theodore Roosevelt]

    Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people.  To destroy this invisible government, to befoul the unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics is the first task of the statesmanship of today.

    [/quote]

    Travlin 

    [/quote]

    This topic lingers with me (no, not sex; the idea of a shadow elite government) and I approach it with a hesitancy attributable to the forum guidelines that prohibit it. Hopefully the mods will grant some leeway given that several presidents including T.R. above, testify to it.

    We see no shadow government, it’s officials, it’s decrees etc., but the void exhibits a  ‘gravitation pull’ that is difficult to dismiss no matter how hard I try. Pondering the current state of world affairs and following all the disparate leads …. nothing makes sense to me of how we got here, until I consider that missing puzzle piece. I’m highly skeptical of conspiracy theories but……….I’m just sayin’….. what?  Idunno…….

    [/quote]

    Hi Earthwise

    Thanks for your reply.  I appreciate your desire to be a good forum member, but I think your concerns are misplaced.  According to the guidelines the two following items must be in the Controversial Topics forum.

    • Global conspiracy theories
    • New world order conspiracy theories

    However, the topic at hand is the struggle for influence over the US Government.  The efforts of Wall Street, big pharma, the health care industry, and oil companies are widely reported and accepted.  Chris has illustrated many times the inordinate control of government policy by big players behind the scenes, so I think we are well within bounds to discuss this more if you’d like.

    The US fought this battle before from about 1900 to 1914 and enacted federal anti-trust laws that helped curb abuses.  Since the 1980s these laws have been largely gutted as business became more powerful and sophisticated at manipulating government, the media, and the public. 

    This theme has been crucial to my understanding of what is really happening to our country.  As you say, “… nothing makes sense to me …” without this piece of the puzzle.  To me it is well documented by reliable sources so it is far from a conspiracy.  Just to give one example, see this article by Simon Johnson, a professor of economics at MIT who was formerly the chief economist for the International Monetary Fund.

    The Quiet Coup  http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2009/05/the-quiet-coup/7364/

    YouTube has many interviews of him.  The ones with Bill Moyers are excellent.  Johnson also has a web site with a link to his recent book 13 Bankershttp://baselinescenario.com/  There are many other credible sources available.

    If anyone wants to discuss this more in this thread that is fine with me.

    Travlin

    • Sun, Feb 20, 2011 - 06:29pm

      #12

      Travlin

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      Thanks for your response

    [quote=safewrite]

    Travlin,

    I do not think government programs will solve all the world’s ills. Neither do I think that they are nessicarilly evil. But they all come with a price – a price we are increasingly unable to afford as a society.These programs will be severely modified or eliminated in the not-too-distant future. What I found amazing was the large percentage of people who did not realize these programs are taxpayer funded. Nothing more or less was my motive for posting this. One of the ways our lives will change is when the current unsustainable situations crumbles and such assistance will not be available any more. I myself had, at one time, and FHA mortgage and a government student loan. Look at the list. Many of us have participated in one or more of these programs.

    One more thing. There is a “holier-than-thou” sort of look down the nose from some conservatives: a sense that they are better than “those people on welfare” and that they are oh-so righteous because THEY don’t use up taxpayer dollars. I’m a conservative, my preious post rather prove that–especially on the Glenn Beck thread–and the belief this study uncovers, that the average American has not used a “government social program”, rather boggles my mind. We ALL use these programs.

    By posting this study I’m not saying that these are bad programs or good programs, or that goverment programs per se are good or bad. I’m saying that we, as a society, do not seem to realize that they are funded via taxpayers.

    [/quote]

    I thought that’s what you were getting at.  Those are very good points to make, and I see things much the same way.  Thanks for clarifying.

    Travlin 

    • Sun, Feb 20, 2011 - 12:33am

      #12

      Travlin

      Status Gold Member (Offline)

      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      Thanks

    [quote=Dogs_In_A_Pile]

    Sager, Travlin?  You guys still in?  The pond is only an hour away.

    [/quote]

    A good bit farther away for me, but thanks for the invite.  Sounds like fun.

    Travlin 

    • Sat, Feb 19, 2011 - 06:21am

      #39

      Travlin

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      Posts: 524

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      Re: Is Gold another bubble?

    [quote=ao]

    [quote=Travlin]

    I pointed out to them that I had sent it FedEx so I had a signed and dated receipt, and that I was recording our phone call.  After a lot of argument they finally backed down and gave me the correct and higher price.  I had to get very tough with them too.  When the SHTF don’t count on being able to get your phone call answered, or even use the internet.

    [/quote]

    Travlin,

    A wise thing to do and a procedure I adopted after having a difference of opinion with a broker.  The brokerage house claims to record conversations but, lo and behold, when the recording would have substantiated my version of events over theirs, somehow it could never be located …. RIGHT!

    [/quote]

    I omitted a detail about recording calls that is important.  I told him up front that the call was being recorded and had him acknowledge it before we got into the conversation.  Laws on recording conversations vary by state, but as I understand it, you are usually legal if the other party is notified up front.  I really didn’t care at that point, as I figured he would know he was on record and behave accordingly.  It is amazing he told me such damning information.  I’m sure he would not want the SEC to hear how badly they bungled things.

    Travlin 

    • Sat, Feb 19, 2011 - 05:17am

      #35

      Travlin

      Status Gold Member (Offline)

      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      Re: Is Gold another bubble?

    [quote=ao]

    I recently encouraged my daughter to open her first IRA at age 21.  I was planning on having her invest in SIVR.  I encouraged her to do it as quickly as possible as I saw a market opportunity emerging.  She opened it and on a Monday and tried to do a wire transfer of the funds into the account.  A simple wire transfer that should have taken minutes was fumbled by an inept bank employee who screwed things up so much it took FIVE DAYS (with my wife and I spending almost 3 hours on the phone to get things straightened out)!.  My daughter he missed out on getting in on silver at 26.80 and with me not wanting buy in a rising market, she’s missed out on adding about $1K to her $5K account. 

    [/quote]

    Ao

    Spoken like a veteran with the scars to prove it.  During the stock market crash of 1987 I had most of my very small savings in a couple of mutual funds.  I sent a redemption notice to one of them, which they couldn’t handle electronically in those days.  A few days later I got a confirmation in the mail, but the price was much lower than on the date they received my notice, so I called them.  They explained that they got so many redemptions that they couldn’t keep up with them, or even open them, so they just threw them all in a store room in one big pile.  The didn’t even separate the by date received!

    After things settled down they pulled them out and redeemed all of them at the current price, which was days later and dollars lower.  They hadn’t even bothered to mark the date of receipt on the notices which was probably illegal.  I pointed out to them that I had sent it FedEx so I had a signed and dated receipt, and that I was recording our phone call.  After a lot of argument they finally backed down and gave me the correct and higher price.  I had to get very tough with them too.  When the SHTF don’t count on being able to get your phone call answered, or even use the internet.

    Travlin 

     

Viewing 10 posts - 421 through 430 (of 440 total)