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    • Fri, May 24, 2013 - 08:44pm

      #6

      Travlin

      Status Gold Member (Offline)

      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      Bravo

    Lmcdel — I wish I had good suggestions for you.  Your critical problem is income in the new location.  A small city outside California might be a good compromise, but you already have a second house as a complication.  As Poet said, water is critical and western Oregon and Washington have plenty.  Your current thinking puts you way ahead of most.

    Poet — That is an excellent relocation plan.  Coming from you, I'm not surprised.

    Travlin 

    • Sun, Apr 21, 2013 - 12:15am

      #2988

      Travlin

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      Posts: 524

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      Gun control – A clash of cultures

    I agree with Ao.  The real issue is not guns, it’s control.  I posted about this in the Firearms Group.  I’ve reproduced that post below.

    —————————————————

    Gun control – A clash of cultures

    The gun control debate is passionate, divisive, and angry.  But ultimately it is not about guns.  It is about control.  This is becoming the line in the sand where some people say – Enough!  We won’t be pushed any further.

    This is the fault line of two cultures with very different views of the world, and freedom.  It will not go away, and it will be a fight to the bitter end.

    To better understand this I recommend reading the remarks below.  Then see the full essay.

    [quote=Fred Reed]
    A staple of American self-esteem is that we Yanks are brave, free, independent, self-reliant, ruggedly individual, and disinclined to accept abuse from anyone.  Call it “freedom.” Because we were free, we felt free.  It was a distinct psychology, though we didn’t know it.

    Things then changed. The country increasingly urbanized. So much for rugged.  Self-reliance went. Few any longer can fix a car or the plumbing, grow food, hunt, bait a hook or install a new roof. Or defend themselves. To overstate barely, everyone depends on someone else, often the government, for everything. Thus we became the Hive.

    Serving as little more than cubicle fodder, they could not survive a serious crisis like the first Depression. And they look to the collective, the hive, for protection. The notion of individual self-defense, whether with a fist or a Sig 9, is, you know, like scary, or, well, just wrong or macho or something. I mean, if you find an intruder in your house at night, shouldn’t you, like, call a caring adult?
    [/quote]

    Read the full essay

    Travlin

    • Fri, Apr 12, 2013 - 10:48pm

      #2

      Travlin

      Status Gold Member (Offline)

      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      Similar item

    When I get a long list of unread items in PeakProsperity forums with the "new and updated" tab, I would read a few and then use the refresh button on my browser to shorten the list.  A few weeks ago this clearing of the read items became intermitent.  As I recall it doesn't refresh at all in ResilientLife until I close and start a new session.

    Travlin

    • Fri, Mar 29, 2013 - 04:41pm

      #35

      Travlin

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      Posts: 524

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      Welcome

    Welcome to the forums Gatortrapper.

    Travlin 

    • Sat, Mar 23, 2013 - 05:12pm

      #3

      Travlin

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      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      Here’s what you need

    MustardSeed

    The new ResilientLife portion of this site has a different structure that meets your needs.  Content is organized by “Groups” which can be set up by location or interest (topic).

    Lo and behold, there is already a Group for alternative energy with several discussions (threads).

    You can start discussions within that Group.  Note the document tab feature too for reference use.

    Travlin

    • Wed, Mar 20, 2013 - 10:18pm

      #15

      Travlin

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      Posts: 524

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      Try this Redwoods

    [quote=redwoods]
    if I have savings of £1000 in the bank and I do not owe anybody anything (except next months rent and bills etc) and I am not in any debt, how is my money 'debt'?
    [/quote]

    Redwoods

    All money is backed by debt.  Your $1,000 deposit allows the bank to lend up to $900 to other people.  (Sorry, no pound sign on my keyboard.)  They can legally say the full amount is still in your account.  This mechanism of “fractional reserve banking” pretends the money is in both places at the same time.  In practice it works well unless too many people want their deposits back at the same time.  That’s called a bank run and is a bankers worst nightmare.  If they have to pay out over 10% of deposits they are broke and are closed by regulators. 

    Your money was originally created by someone else’s debt.

    The concept is simple once you understand it.  Your money is not debt, it is backed by debt.

    Travlin

    • Wed, Mar 20, 2013 - 04:24am

      #29

      Travlin

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      Posts: 524

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      The trials of the Boomers and their parents

    FAlley

    Nickbert inspired my to take us back a little farther.

    The Boomers were born from 1946-1964.  Our childhoods were the height of the Cold War.  We grew up knowing that at any moment we could die in a nuclear war.  During the Cuban Missile Crisis it nearly happened.  We would have 15 minutes warning at most, and if at school no chance to say goodbye to our families, or die with them.  I never expected to reach adulthood.

    The Civil Rights movement created serious social turmoil and anger that erupted in massive riots and many burning cities over multiple years.  We had the Counter Culture revolution of the young, and the Generation Gap of “Don’t trust anyone over 30.”  In 1968 Martin Luther King was assassinated, and Bobby Kennedy a few weeks later as he ran for president.  In the fall was the “police riot” against demonstrators at the Democratic National Convention.  The feminist movement created turmoil in the roles of the sexes.  From 1963 to 1975 everything was up in the air.

    As young men reached 18 they became subject to the military draft.  Millions were called up and shipped off to Vietnam where over 50,000 died.  There were vocal protest demonstrations across the nation for years, and the largest demonstrations in US history happened during this period.  Tens of thousands of young men went underground, fled the country, or were imprisoned.  The nation, and families, were torn apart and the level of anger and hatred was palpable.  Many of us wondered how we could ever find a place for ourselves in such a broken system, or get it to leave us alone.  We didn’t think much of the world our parents left us.  Many rejected it and wandered during our formative years.  Plenty lost their way and died young.  Others became broken relics and objects of scorn to younger people because they weren’t “winners”.

    As we entered our work years the economy underwent a sea change with the first Arab oil embargo in 1973.  Real income adjusted for inflation has essentially been flat ever since.  A man had to get a promotion to increase his buying power.  For the first time mothers in mass left their children at home so they could take a job.  For many it was the only way to obtain middle class status for the family.  Job security disappeared and even many of the earlier boomers found themselves out of a job in their fifties with no prospects for re-employment.  Most people with pensions were converted to 401ks and lost much of their retirement money in the crash of 2008.  What’s left of their life savings now receives negative real interest rates unless they take excessive risks.

    Now the Greatest Generation – boy did they have it good!  Married women didn’t have to work and men’s real income doubled from 1947-1973.  Of course as children all they knew was the Great Depression, when some Americans actually starved.  And as early as age 17 they were fighting a long World War.  If they survived there were a few years of economic turmoil and great inflation as the economy converted to peacetime production.  And everyone was terrified it would slip back into a deep depression again.  For three years in the early 1950s my newlywed parents had no place of their own even though my dad had a good job.  They had to rent a series of upstairs bedrooms and share a bath in other people’s houses because housing was so short in the city.  This was not uncommon.

    After a few years things got pretty good for the Greatest Generation.  They lived well and had lots of healthy children.  Of course this was during the height of the Cold War, and those children grew up and totally freaked them out and …  well, just go back and read the beginning again.

    Boomers have not distinguished themselves with virtue.  But they didn’t sabotage you either.  People everywhere just want to have a decent life, which usually includes marriage and children in modest comfort.  This takes our best efforts and we really don’t have much influence over the trends of history .  We just try to make the best of the world that was shaped by those before us.

    Millennials, my children, are indeed getting a raw deal.  It make me angry but it has to be dealt with.  Whining won’t help.  Assuming a victim mentality brings certain defeat.  You are extremely lucky compared to people caught in past wars.  And there is nothing you can do against a nuclear missile.  Your future may be tougher than expected, but it is one you can make better by your own efforts.  You should be able to survive and have a long and decent life.

    Being young can be tough, but you have great strength and resilience.  Being old is tougher.  Learn as you go so you’ll be ready for that. 

    Best of luck to you.

    Travlin

     

    • Wed, Mar 13, 2013 - 07:09am

      #22

      Travlin

      Status Gold Member (Offline)

      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      It’s nice to be noticed

    [quote=AkGrannyWGrit]And, in the process we often encounter humor and a few oddballs too.[/quote]

    “I resemble that remark.”  cool

    Travlin 

    • Wed, Mar 13, 2013 - 04:00am

      #2933

      Travlin

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      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      Bravo A.M.

    [quote=A. M.]
    This fundemental differences between the sexes demonstrates a massive rift in our current political environment, as generations of men who're raised in the feminine world of urbane sophistication in which a man is identified as successful by having possessions compete with more rural men who've long been epitomized by self-reliance, skill and capability. 

    Teaching kids (especially boys) to be 'fearful' is a disgusting practice. Removing courage from society will sow absolutely no good, and to those who believe the trade off is worth it because these boys will grow up more intelligent – read a history text, and pick up some philosophy. 
     [/quote]

    A.M.

    You have identified one of the fundamental problems in modern US life; and yes, it is a leading cause of our political conflict and paralysis.  Both sexes have their virtues and shortcomings.  Ideally they balance each other and the combination is stronger  Shifting both sexes to an androgynous middle is not good for anyone.

    When the male attributes of aggression and courage are channeled properly they result in loving men who support and protect their families.  When fundamental aspects of the nature of boys are denied you create serious problems.  I suggest that mass shootings are just one example.

    Thanks for sharing your insight.  Few people seem to understand this.

    Travlin

    • Wed, Mar 13, 2013 - 03:28am

      #20

      Travlin

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      Joined: Apr 15 2010

      Posts: 524

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      Another welcome

    MacKay

    Add my welcome to your collection.  I’d like to hear much more about your observations and thoughts.  I agree with your post, but I’m sure you have plenty to add to that.

    Travlin

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 440 total)