Forum Replies Created

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 115 total)
  • Author
    Posts
    • Wed, Aug 08, 2012 - 02:25pm

      #15
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      What is slogging?  I’m

    What is slogging?  I’m assuming you mean the sloshing around in the bucket when you move it?

    Materials I’ve tested and I know work-

    -Pine chips.  Absorb lots of liquid (which eliminates slogging, if I’m correct in the definition)

    -Peat.  Not by itself, but works excellent as an odor eliminator.

    -Straw.  Needs to be chopped up, we used a bagging lawn mower.

    -Dried up weeds.  Again, need to be somewhat fine.

    Materials I’ve tested that don’t work (or don’t work well)-

    -Peat by itself.  Uses way too much, very messy to empty because it turns into one big… you know.

    -Leaves.  Fine in the toilet, but stop the hot composting process by blocking oxygen exchange.  Without heat, you’re asking for trouble.

    We compost year-round, the pile heats quickly except in the middle of winter.  Straw bales as compost bin work well to insulate and keep the heat up.  The pile WILL stink while you are emptying the buckets, but the smell magically disappears with about 6 inches of straw cover.

    We use 4 buckets on rotation.  When one is full, it goes next the compost bin.  When 3 buckets are full, I add it as a layer in the compost pile, wash out the buckets and set them in the sun to dry/disinfect.

    You MUST get your temps up into the 140-160 F range in order to kill possible pathogens.  My animals have never tested positive for any parasites, but it’s still a best practice.  To “re-cook” a pile, I wait until I get a little over a yard of compost, then use the tractor to spread it out.  At this point it has no odor, and looks like potting soil.  I then add more straw, and cottonseed meal (for extra N).  Then I put the pile back into the strawbale bin.  Within a day or two, it’s screaming hot (155 +) and stays hot for about a week.  After it cools to ambient, I move the pile into the aging area, and wait a few months before using.  Between the animals and the kids, we make about 2 yards per year.

    I’d really like to build a seperating toilet though.  I’ve been using urine as a fertilizer all season, and works quite well on pretty much every high-N feeding plant, with no evidence of salt injury.  Plus, buckets full of pee and poo are heavy, I am the only one who can process them into the pile.  I’d estimate they weigh 25 lbs each or so, and you have to be able to dump them without gettin any on ya…:)

    • Tue, Aug 07, 2012 - 03:37pm

      #2
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Most of our populace has been

    Most of our populace has been well-conditioned to think and act within an ever-tightening box of regulation, rules, bureaucracies, etc.  You sound like you have already taken the firsts steps in leaving these restrictions behind, but in doing so, have found yourself somewhat alone.  This is perfectly natural.  Most of the people around you are cannon fodder, to put it bluntly.  They are so completely mentally enslaved to the system that is collapsing around them, they will not see or believe it until it is far too late.  However, I am SURE there are a few others near you that are starting to see the light, you might just have to find them.

    This is only if you are dead-set on staying.  I think a much better route is to simply leave.  Where you live, you are surrounded by automatons.  Human beings NEED community, if you cannot build one there, go where one exists already or is at least open to it.

    If I was in your position, I would for a manufactured home on a little bit of property, say 1/2 acre.  More would be better.  Or, a manu. home near a vacant lot/open area that might be used for gardening.  To really be able to produce food for yourselves, you need some space and experience growing.  Farming is not simple.  If you wait until you need the garden, you will likely fail due to problems that would have been worked out during the first 2-3 years of soil building, experimental plantings, etc.  Having a stockpile of seeds, but no experience growing, is like buying a hammer and thinking you are now qualified to build a house.

    Newer manufactured homes have a couple advantages over traditional, stick-built homes.  They are mobile.  They are made in climate-controlled buildings, which means mold/mildew issues are usually non-existant.  They have plumbing that is readily accessible from underneath.  This last advantage applies to post-pier homes too.  Accessible plumbing means you can easily upgrade to a gray water system, something that is very expensive to do with a slab.

    One last word on regulations- you may find a huge disparity between what is allowed on paper, and what is allowed in practice.  I have code violations on my property (all related to being prepared, being efficient and being a good steward of the land) and I’m not being hassled.  In my area, it’s because I do not appear to have money.  Our code inpsectors typically limit their enforcement to those with obvious dollars and not well-connected to the county government.  After living here for many years and watching the goings-on, I’ve learned it’s far better to ask for forgiveness than permission.  It’s actually illegal to paint the interior of your house without a permit here!

    Whatever you do, maintain solidarity within your family.  If you can’t do it at home, you can’t do it in the community.  Lead by example!  Best of luck,

    • Thu, Jul 05, 2012 - 03:17pm

      #9
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Another 5 gallon bucket user

    Another 5 gallon bucket user here.  We use wood shavings and peat for covering it, no sloshing, and the only odor is when the kids forget to adequately apply cover material, and when i dump them into the compost heap.  We’re on septic and well, so two good reasons not to use drinking water for pooping in.  I’ve found adults do not adapt well, but kids have no problem with the “bucket solution”.

    The “lack of browns” issue effects not just humanure toilets, but any composting program.  Right now, i’m looking at buying bales of straw, since our compost program has far more greens than browns, for inputs.  As far as using industrial waste, the world ain’t going back to the stone ages, we will always have mills.  Unfortunately, we have no timber industry here, so I have to be more creative.  We have used dry grass clippings too, they work OK, but not as good as peat for covering odors.

    Wood chips are essentially free if you build a relationship with a tree trimming crew/company, perhaps we’ll experiment with that next.  Adapt, improvise, and overcome.

    I too wish that there was something between ultra-simple and ultra-expensive…

    • Thu, Jun 28, 2012 - 04:53pm

      #1284
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Anybody that wants help on

    Anybody that wants help on dealing with high temps, I’ll gladly let you learn from my mistakes!  Where I live, we’ve already seen temps above 106 F, with humidity at 12%.  Then at night, it drops into the 40’s.

    On your research-  there’s some disagreement on N2 tie-up and wood chips.  Many people believe that tie-up only happens with relatively fresh chips, tilled into the soil.  Wood chips applied as mulch cannot extract N2 from the root zone 6 inches down.  I plan on testing this later this year.

    Shade cloth is a great investment in hot, desert-like areas.  We plant everything under 30% black cloth, and it out-perfoms all our neighbor’s gardens.  The only exception seems to be corn.  I throw 30% cloth over our greenhouses starting in mid-June (last week actually), and that keeps the temps down.  Our tomatoes under this fabric did NOT lose flowers during our mini heat wave.  Air temps are important, but actually LEAF temps are what matter to the plant.  Place a cheap digital thermometer about 3 inches down in the leaf canopy, use one that records maximum and minimum temps, and you’ll get a really good idea what’s going on.  August for us is the acid test, temps get over 110 usually for about a week or so, with humidity in the 10-15% range.

    Open-ended hoop houses work really well here, too.  The length should be no more than 2x the width for maximum ventilation, and the ends have no walls.  In Spain, these are used frequently for berry production, as they filter and diffuse the sunlight, plus keep dust off the produce.  The Spanish models are really just long umbrellas, the sides do not touch the ground.

    And oh yeah, drip is an absolute neccessity in this climate.  We plant in composted horse manure, watered 2x daily to keep the root zone damp, but with only just enough water, no runoff.  This has been our best year yet, our tomatoes are 6 feet tall right now, and we’ve already made about 2 gallons of salsa!

    • Thu, Jun 28, 2012 - 04:26pm

      #1283
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      I’ll be your master gardener

    I’ll be your master gardener for the day…:)  Not really, but I do have a lot of experience with tomatoes and peppers.  This year our first red tomato came off the vine mid-April.

    There’s not enough info in your post to accurately diagnose your issue, so I’ll give you a list of possibilities you can explore.  Pictures of plant problems are EXTREMELY helpful!

    Curled leaves are typically signs of moisture stress.  This can be caused by a poor or diseased root system, too little water in the soil, too MUCH water in the soil, infrequent watering, and systemic disease.  Another cause you see listed on the websites is night time temps, but we get temp swings of 50 degrees, day to night, and I don’t have curling leaves on my 30+ plants.

    There are other possible causes too, but the above is where you should start.  I’ve found that a raised bed, or any bed with really well drained soil will need water twice a day when the conditions are hot AND dry.  Low humidity (below 50%) greatly increases moisture stress.  The challenge when watering this frequently is to not over-water, which deprives the root zone of O2, and causes rot root, which exacerbates the moisture stress.

    One last thing to look for when you go out today to check your tomatoes- leaf discoloration, and aphid/whiteflies.  Leaf curl WITH discoloration generally points to disease, if your soil is otherwise fertile and healthy.  Aphids and whiteflies can really take off, especially in a greenhouse, but can be reasonably controlled with a cold water spray and/or organic pesticides.  I have my own recipe for spray that is pretty effective if you end up needing it.

    Hope this helps!

    • Wed, Apr 04, 2012 - 09:48pm

      #6
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      who’s the liar?

    “An almost hysterical antagonism toward the gold standard is one issue which unites statists of all persuasions. They seem to sense — perhaps more clearly and subtly than many consistent defenders of laissez-faire — that gold and economic freedom are inseparable, that the gold standard is an instrument of laissez-faire and that each implies and requires the other.”  – Alan Greenspan, 1966

    Surely, Bernanke doesn’t have ulterior motives, only our best interests.  Surely…:)

    “This is the shabby secret of the welfare statists’ tirades against gold. Deficit spending is simply a scheme for the confiscation of wealth. Gold stands in the way of this insidious process. It stands as a protector of property rights. If one grasps this, one has no difficulty in understanding the statists’ antagonism toward the gold standard.”  -Greenspan

    Bernanke is totally decepetive when he tries to make the case that the economy was more volatile under a “gold standard”.  The historical fact is, countries abandoned the gold standard whenever it was to their advantage, usually to start wars.  This is simply more fiat money, NOT a gold standard.  Volatility also resulted each time governments enacted trade restrictions and regulation designed to opress other countries/parties.  In other words, most volatility was directly caused by government action, not some innate quality of the gold standard.

    His BS about farms during the depression is amusing as well.  Stupid ag practices along with the worst drought in history caused farming to fail, regardless.  The credit expansion of ther 1920’s caused commodities to crash, which put another nail in the coffin.  Credit expansion via, you guessed it, fractional reserve banking!

    Now, anyone know what I can get for these Confederate notes?

    • Thu, Mar 29, 2012 - 10:29pm

      #10
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Conquer the fear, have the

    Conquer the fear, have the parent that makes the least quit their job and homeschool.  Where there is a will, there’s a way.

    Barring that, teach your children reading comprehension.  Public schools fail at this miserably.

    The whole world of knowledge is available to those with excellent reading skills.  With Google, an sharp kid can research almost any subject, at a college or professional level, without leaving their home.

    Those who do not excel in comprehension are subject to legal problems and scams of all sorts (like fiat money!), plus they will be dependent on someone else teaching them if they cannot do it for themselves.

    The other thing I think is important is developing a work ethic.  My kids have never gotten allowances, they pick chores from the “big board” and get paid for them.  We also do not buy them anything except food and clothing.  They buy their own bikes, helmets, games, etc.  My 10 year old just bought his own digital camera (he loves photography and Photoshop).  Not only do they not mind this, they seem to really enjoy going to the store with THEIR money.  My oldest (12 years) is fully aware this is not how the “other kids” do it, and she doesn’t mind because she is aware of the value of work ethic.

    If you want to see just how stupid public schooling has made our children, pick up a copy of New England Primer or the early McGuffey Reader, and see what they expected young children to read, understand and memorize.  I know adults that would struggle with the material.

    • Tue, Mar 27, 2012 - 10:44pm

      #2
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      “No government except the

    “No government except the police, courts of law, and the armed services.

    No regulation of anything by any government.

    No Medicare or Medicaid.

    No Social Security.

    No public schools.

    No public hospitals.

    No public anything, in fact. Just individuals, each looking out for himself, not asking for help or giving help to anyone.”

    The last sentence is purely the author’s conjecture.  In fact, the other conditions existed for some time in early America, and despite this, people were NOT overwhelmingly selfish.  Quite the opposite.  I would suggest that when socialism prevails, people become less charitable.  After all, we have programs for those things, don’t we?

    Now here’s my point:  the author says this would be a horrible, Darwinian world.

    Why should it be anything else?  After all, if survival of the fittest led to the ever-increasing intelligence and ability of mankind, why would we, as a society, want to begin to undo this progress?

    The fact of the matter is that less capable individuals, regardless of species, are a drag on the rest.  Why should these individuals not only be allowed to reproduce, but actually be given assistance in doing so?

    I’m not saying I agree with this line of thinking, but it is the elephant in the room if you want to talk about the long-term effects of socialism.  The movie “Idiocracy” comes to mind.

    This is where the argument for statism breaks down.  To do “good”, the state must resort to violence, all the while expecting to have a complete monopoly over said violence.  The problem is, it doesn’t work.

    Let me give you an example from CA on at least one area where government is superfluous:  medical marijuana.  There is a HUGE economy, flourishing, DESPITE the complete lack of any regulation.  Any qualified patient has easy access to the highest quality cannabis in the WORLD, tested to be free of all pesticides, fungus, molds, and verified for potency.  Why?  Competition.  Dispensaries compete with each other for patients, growers compete with each other to get top-dollar for their produce, and patients have access to clean flowers, in more varieties, strains, and modes of consumption than was ever available on the black market.  In fact, right now ground-breaking research is being done, not with government grants, but by individual doctors interested in the un-tapped possibilities of this plant.  Check out  “project CBD”.  All the government had to do was get out of the way.

    The calls for regulation of MM aren’t coming from patients, they are coming largely from people that see dollar signs, and want a cut, or think that somehow regulation will get the Federal government off their back (it won’t).

    The author of the article conveniently fails to discuss major projects that were NOT built by government.  How about the whole railroad system of Great Britain?  Or the Great Northern railroad?

    Then there’s the nonsense about non-profits disappearing, and health care.  Anyone with google is capable of learning the history of charitable organizations before the advent of US socialism, if they choose.  These organizations were not perfect, but neither is any other system which involves humans.

    The author decries the oligarchy that Ayn Rand’s world would surely be, but what the HELL do we have now?!?  How many millionaires do we have writting our laws for us?  More government and regulation won’t change the fact that rich people are also powerful.  Sorry, welcome to earth!

    While I believe Ayn Rand to be largely capitalist propaganda, this is nothing but socialist propaganda, and only effective on those properly indoctrinated to ignore even the recent history of this country.

    • Tue, Mar 27, 2012 - 02:44pm

      #14
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Job number one should

    Job number one should community-building.  Think about this- if you lost your job today, who in your neighborhood would be able to help you find some work?  If you were out of food, who would be willing and able to help?  Build those relationships BEFORE they are needed.  I consider a gradual slide into lawlessness a very real consequence of a failing/failed economy, community-building will go a long way toward insulating peope against this.

    Welding is a better bet than blacksmithing, IMO.  Personally, I find a total return to the early 1800’s highly improbable at best.  Even an EMP wouldn’t eliminate all technological progress.

    I am continually surprised at how difficult it is to grow enough food for one’s family, and how few people are capable of doing it.  Reading and test gardens, starting today, should be part of your education.

    • Tue, Mar 20, 2012 - 11:10pm

      #2
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Hilarious

    Ahhh, central bankers won’t be able to control the economy under a gold standard?  Now that’s a damn shame!

    My favorite part-

    If not “perfectly credible,” the gold standard can be subject to speculative attack and ultimately collapse as people try to exchange paper money for gold.

    That’s a real bummer, not being able to lie to people about how much gold the bank actually has.

    Fiat is fraud, always has been.  Without it, governments would be severely limited in their power.  That WOULD be a shame, wouldn’t it?

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 115 total)