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    • Thu, Oct 10, 2013 - 06:20pm

      #46
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

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      wow

    Adam, you got bombed with a lot of advice, most of it good.  Major kudos on taking the bull by the horns on your fitness, BTW.

    I noticed there's a bit of advice in this thread that is simply not backed by good science, i.e. not eating breakfast and "Paleo" dieting.  I'm not saying that the Paleo diet isn't effective (it is), but the foundational arguments are unsound.

    Without trying to step on anyone's toes, whenever you read material in books or in articles you may find on the net, be sure to check references.  If there are none, or they are limited, it's actually quite easy to research what is out there academically on the subject.  Simply go to google, enter your search phrase followed by "ncbi".  This will take you to the vast library of the National Center for Biotechnology Information.  Here you will be able to read the abstracts of studies done around the world on virtually every subject you can think of related to biotech.  I have found it incredibly useful for my research into exercise, nutrition and farming.

    After spending some time on NCBI and PubMed, I've found that many articles on nutrition and exercise that appear on the net are seriously flawed; sometimes they are dead wrong, sometimes they simply do not reflect the fact that there is no concensus on the issue they are writing about, and leave out data that does not support their conclusions.

    Unless you are used to reading highly technical papers, you may find some of the language a bit daunting at first.  I certainly did!  But I quickly expanded my vocabulary to accommodate.

    If I can throw my own personal advice in here, it would be find what works for YOU, both in the diet and exercise arena, and then make it habit.  Especially where exercise is concerned, there is a wide variation in response from individual to individual, and humans are highly adaptable where diet is concerned.  Even the best programs fail when the participant no longer complies.

    Looking forward to seeing your progress!

    • Tue, Apr 09, 2013 - 07:30pm

      #3
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      Selective Service (any

    Selective Service (any military service, actually) is simply indentured servitude, one of the many forms of slavery.  You become property of the state.  To force it upon an entire population, in the name of protecting "freedom" is a bit ironic.

    Consider this: if it is necessary to force people into war in the name of protecting a so-called free country, is that country any longer worth protecting?

    Even our entry into WW2, after the attack on Pearl Harbor, was a fraud.  We poked and prodded the Japanese into attacking us, and let's not even go into the material support our corporations (ahem, BUSH family) provided to the Nazis.

    Any war we get into will certainly appear to be for very good reasons.  Just as certain will be the fact that we will have been lied to about what led to it.

    Göring: Why, of course, the people don't want war. Why would some poor slob on a farm want to risk his life in a war when the best that he can get out of it is to come back to his farm in one piece? Naturally, the common people don't want war; neither in Russia nor in England nor in America, nor for that matter in Germany. That is understood. But, after all, it is the leaders of the country who determine the policy and it is always a simple matter to drag the people along, whether it is a democracy or a fascist dictatorship or a Parliament or a Communist dictatorship.
    Gilbert: There is one difference. In a democracy, the people have some say in the matter through their elected representatives, and in the United States only Congress can declare wars.
    Göring: Oh, that is all well and good, but, voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same way in any country.

     

    • Wed, Dec 05, 2012 - 12:09am

      #21
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      changing your view

    “Don’t worry about trying to change my view.”  Forgive me if I have misinterpreted, but this sounds an awful lot like “I am immune to logical argument.”  Not a good place to be.

    Sounds like you shored up your finances, that is awesome, congratulations.  Many people get stuck right there, can’t make it happen.

    However, your optimism could easily become denial, especially when it comes to the comments about not worrying about food, you can leave anytime you want.  Look at the historical evidence, this is rarely true.  This isn’t the world’s first rodeo, there are plenty of countries whose woes you can read about, and exactly how their citizens were effected.

    Leaving a country that is in upheaval is frequently close to impossible, governments frequently lock down their borders financially and physically.  Now, if you really have a LOT of something valuable, you can get out of just about anything, for a price, but that’s not most of us.

    I don’t want anybody to be stripped of their optimism, but let’s be realistic.  The easiest way to stay realistic is to ask yourself, “has this every happened before?  If so, where and how did people deal with it?”

    If your opinions do not jive with historical fact, you might want to re-think them.

     

    • Mon, Nov 19, 2012 - 07:17pm

      #5
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      55 gallon drums for rainwater

    55 gallon drums for rainwater collection are a joke.  That small amount would only be suitable for emergency rations for a few people, provided the water was sanitized first.  If you want to use the water for plants, you will need many hundreds of gallons, at least, in any semi-arid area.

    A much better idea is a home-made tank, using plywood and EPMD liner (or equivalent).  You can easily store thousands of gallons in such a tank.  Another option is an above-ground swimming pool or something like it, but then you will need to figure out how to prevent or minimize algae growth.

    Personally, we use a pair of 5K storage tanks, and another pair of 800 gallon tanks for another garden area.  That is 11,600 gallons.  This is not enough to make it through a long, hot summer (like the one we just had) but it gets us more than 3/4 of the way through.

    After much thought, empirical research and experience, I think the way to go is hugelculture beds combined with reservoirs for rainwater storage.  Minimize use, maximize storage capability.  A 55-gallon barrel or three for a reality-based garden is like putting an RV-sized solar charger on the roof of your 3,000 sq ft home and calling it “off the grid”…:)

    • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 07:37pm

      #8
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      Simple Solution

    Eliminate limited liability.  Contrary to apparent popular thought, limited liability is a new concept, and one that not only destroyed jobs, it also resulted in speculative investment, short-sighted environmental practices, and the ability to separate risk from reward; i.e. societal risk and private reward.  Does this pretty much sum up what’s wrong with corporate America?

    Regulations aren’t needed when the consequence for polluting someone’s water table is death.  How many CEOs would you have to execute before business practices became ethical?  I’m guessing zero, because once you eliminate the limits on liability, the possible results will become painfully obvious.  CEOs are not stupid, just amoral and opportunistic.

    • Wed, Sep 19, 2012 - 11:10pm

      #2
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      Not an expert, but…

    Correct, the FED and government are afraid of deflation.  They intentionally create “manageable” inflation, though they only recently admitted to this.  I remember growing up with adults bewildered and arguing on what causes inflation, now we know!  Inflation benefits the banks and government, deflation favors the thrifty consumer.

    I believe you would see velocity pick up when/if consumers began borrowing to spend again.  There are some that believe the excess liquidity will have to break loose at some point, thus triggering massive inflation.  I’m not sure, the financial system is incredibly complex.  Purposely so, I believe.

    • Thu, Sep 13, 2012 - 04:52pm

      #2
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      I’m sorry, did you say

    I’m sorry, did you say something? 🙂

    (that comment is intended for the writer of the article, not the person who posted it here)

    • Thu, Aug 23, 2012 - 06:12pm

      #10
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      The Ghetto Method

    Or redneck method, whichever you prefer…

    I use a normal household vacuum, with the crevice nozzle attachment and a hot iron (no steam).  If the material is loose and lightweight, a nylon stocking over the nozzle tip prevents it from sucking up any contents.  You fill the bag (I use mylar), then seal all but the last inch or so, then insert the crevice nozzle, turn on the vacuum, and seal the rest as the vacuum maintains suction.  I usually throw in a few oxygen scavengers.

    This produces very tightly sealed bags, and can be done with mylar bags in plastic buckets.

    My neighbor uses and recommends the FoodSaver he got from Costco.  He also uses the method I outlined.  Actually, he showed it to me.  He only uses the FoodSaver for meats.

    • Wed, Aug 22, 2012 - 03:34pm

      #3
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      I’ve used my neighbor’s

    I’ve used my neighbor’s (can’t remember the brand) and I’ve used “ghetto vacuum sealing”.  The cheap method works just as well for certain foodstuffs, you just need the bags and a standard vacuum.  I use mylar heat-seal bags, I seal them almost all the way across.  Then I insert the vacuum crevice nozzle, and run across the gap with the iron.  This works especially well with O2 absorbers.

    My neighbor’s machine works very well, and he’s used it lots over the past 4 years.  I’ll see what brand he uses…

    • Wed, Aug 22, 2012 - 03:28pm

      #2
      tictac1

      tictac1

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      Don’t you think it might be

    Don’t you think it might be in their best interest to NOT tell the truth?  Even if they do understand the nature of the beast, why give good advice to every Joe Sixpack?  “Hey everybody, get out of the market now, and help collapse my fortune!”

    Of course, their view of “past history” is completely myopic.  The long view of history shows that all fiat currencies return to zero, and that debt crushes nations, leads to war, etc.

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 115 total)