Forum Replies Created

Viewing 10 posts - 91 through 100 (of 115 total)
  • Author
    Posts
    • Thu, Jul 14, 2011 - 04:43pm

      #14
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      answers

    Dogs in heat are a distraction for MALE dogs, neutered or not.  Females in heat are not allowed to compete because of this.  However, a female in heat does not present a problem for herself, in my experience.  We use urine from a bitches heat cycle to purposely distract our dogs in training.  Also use coyote urine.

    By “inherently dominant”, I mean the dog will general seek higher pack rank.  For a human who is naturally “in charge”, this is not a problem.  Between dogs, it IS a problem, since they will work this out through violence.  Often times, this behavior will not become an issue until the dog is 3 or 4 years old.

    As for APBT and mixes, yes, each dog is an individual, but many of the pits I have seen are too trusting to use as security dogs.  There ARE exceptions, I happen to own one, and I know of several lines that have been bred exclusively for bite work for many generations.  However, these dogs are not available to the general public as their breeders are understandably concerned about the dog’s image when used in this capacity.  If you happen to get lucky and get a pit that will do the work, they are usually extremely tenacious and durable.  You will have a hard time finding someone to train the dog, though, since most trainers are not familiar with the breed in this context, and the training techniques ARE different.  GSD training methods used on pits typically produce lackluster work, pits need more stimulation in the early phases of training to take it seriously. 

    Overall, you would be better off to stick with the standard breeds unless a good candidate falls into your lap.

    • Thu, Jul 14, 2011 - 04:31pm

      #13
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Mostly Propaganda

    Most of that article is hype.  I work with police and military dogs, as well as civilian “black tie” protection dogs.  In general, the military and police have lower quality dogs, because of the cap placed on dollar amount for the initial purchase.

    I’ll point out some of the more obvious bull-

    Ti caps are done because the dog has broken his teeth.  This is usually because of “leaking drive”, i.e. a dog that takes out his frustrations on his surroundings, and ruins his teeth.  Common, but not ideal.  Caps don’t improve bite quality, nor are they “razor-sharp”, nor do they penetrate body armor any better than regular old teeth.  Plus, body armor is designed to be worn over the “10 ring” on the chest and abdomen, not the target areas for K9’s, so penetrating body armor is not needed.  That said, regular teeth and Ti teeth both can do serious damage in short order on unprotected flesh.  The compression alone causes pain and bruising, even when I wear my bite suit.

    They cannot differentiate between a hostage and a hostage taker.  They CAN, with handler help, attack the correct person, with probably 80-90% success.  The only possible exception to this would be in areas where all the “bad guys” eat the same thing, like in Vietnam with the VCs.

    I’d have to see proof that their dogs will obey commands via radio.  Most police/military dogs won’t out even with their handler standing there screaming at them, and have to be “hard outed” or physically removed.  The “bark and hold” is a Schutzhund technique used in police work to cover strict liability issues.  “Yes, your honor, my K9 has been trained to perform a bark and hold”, so the perp must have done something to trigger the dog to bite.”  In reality, we cover it enough to say we cover it, then concentrate on ensuring the dog doesn’t let go prematurely or fail to engage, which is what happens when you spend too much time on the BnH.

    Overall, you will see the best training and best dogs in the hands of civilians.  This is because the military sets a purchase cap at $3000 per dog (last I checked), and good dogs usually start at $5000.  Also, their trainers are not the best.  Hands down, the best dog trainers come from Europe, and are usually the product of generations of families working with dogs, and competing at high levels of the bite sports.

    I’m not trying to take anything away from our military dogs, just set the record straight.  They are capable of stuff most people think improbable, if not impossible.  However, the same quality of dog or better is available to anyone with money to spend, and time to invest in good training.

     

    • Wed, Jul 13, 2011 - 06:26pm

      #2422
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      The idea of “which weapon”

    The idea of “which weapon” presupposes the battlefield.  Unless we are aggressors, we don’t usually get to determine where the fight happens.

    If you are defending a home, you have many homecourt advantages.  In general, the only advantages to the aggressor can be superior force and surprise.  Both can be dealt with to degrees.  Dogs and alarms can cheaply negate the element of surprise to a large degree.

    From airsoft FoF drills, it becomes pretty obvious that a force entering a hold is at a real disadvantage.  They are subject to a general lack of knowledge about their immediate surroundings.  This makes ambushes and other trickery very easy to use against them, as well as built-in or improvised defenses that the enemy will have no knowledge of.

    Overall, I don’t think military tactics have much bearing on home defense, since most are based on situations that will not be replicated in your house, or on your farm.

    • Wed, Jul 06, 2011 - 10:04pm

      #9
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Assumptions

    There’s quite a few assumptions at work that may or may not have validity…

    The assumption that much of a person’s wealth is transfered to children.  Many people “spend their children’s inheritance”, and much wealth is absorbed by the state and lawyers when the average person dies.

    The assumption that people will sell belongs rather than work.  “Jobs” aren’t needed to make money, not jobs in the employer sense.

    The assumption that standards of living will remain relatively unchanged, i.e. people will not shack up 13 to a house.  The Mexican workers in my area do exactly that, and seem to be pretty happy with the situation.

    When i was a “tertiary accounts analyst” (bill collector), I saw with relative frequency the following scam-

    Keep your credit impeccable till old age.  Get as many high-limit credit cards and accounts as you can.  Buy yourself an RV, tell the bank to fuck off, and live the rest of your days driving around the country.  I can’t really say for certain about the last part, only that they buy RVs and disappear, never to be collected from again.  We simply couldn’t figure out where they were, let alone repo anything.  Maybe they went to the Grand Canyon, maybe they parked it at their kids home, who knows, but we wrote those off.

    Nowadays, i can’t say i blame them for screwing the banks.  Hell, Thomas Jefferson died $100K in debt.  That was a LOT of money back then!

    • Wed, Jul 06, 2011 - 06:54pm

      #20
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      The Roman Empire conquered

    The Roman Empire conquered the world on a 1% tax rate, up to 3% in times of war.  Ask yourself, why do our world governments need 30%, 40%, 50% of our earnings?  It’s silly to say “Americans pay less tax than other civilized countries”.  Getting robbed the least does not mean we are not robbed.

    Like us, the Romans debased their currency, which led to oppressive taxes (by ancient standards, we should be so lucky) and economic hardships.

    My opinion is that we have WAY too many welfare recipients.  By that, I mean public employees that do not produce anything.  The DOD alone is responsible for vast amounts of wasteful spending, through both bureaucracy and wars of aggression that immensely profit our war-based corporations through wealth confiscation, and the corporations that rebuild the stuff we bomb.  We pay to rent those bombs til they drop, then we BUY the bomb, then we pay for the school/hospital/what-not to get rebuilt.

    “That’s what government’s for.  To get in a man’s way”  -Malcolm Reynolds, Firefly series

    • Tue, Jun 21, 2011 - 07:40pm

      #2
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Does anyone actually believe

    Does anyone actually believe that all these rules and regs are there to protect us?  Actions speak louder than words.  From the SEC to our local sheriff department, the emphasis is on protecting corporate America and their profit margin, not us peons.  In my county, those who build a home themselves are subjected to intense scrutiny, many times resulting in fines and fees for things the builder never knew were required, whereas contractors are not only frequently NOT inspected, they are allowed to do outright illegal things.  Our sheriff dept. seizes bank accounts of people they arrest, then declines to press charges but keeps the money/assets.  I believe that’s called a “racket”.

    In this case, it’s amazing that investors got anything, other similar actions by the SEC have been to profit themselves.

    “Protection” is the buzzword used to sell tyranny to the ignorant.

     

    • Thu, Jun 16, 2011 - 07:59pm

      #12
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Yikes!  If it made the dog

    Yikes!  If it made the dog sick, i would not water root veggies/tubers with it. 

    I have 2 800 gallon tanks, and 2 5000 gallon tanks.  All 4 tanks are crystal clear, as of yesterday, and our last rain event was about 3 weeks ago.  It’s probably the result of adding a tiny amount of bleach, BUT it’s also possible that my heavy-duty tanks do not transmit as much light as do blue barrels.  Those blue barrels will readily grow algae, in my experience.  But then again, it never made my animals sick, so something is certainly different.

    I think it depends a lot on the area too, ours is high desert, not much grows here except what we cultivate, so perhaps our roofs are less contaminated by various bacterial/viral agents/whatnot.

    Another issue to consider is roof materials.  Some will dump large amounts of hydrocarbons and other crap into your water, so it pays to do some research in this area.

    One thing I’ve found through testing and experimentation is that rain water is superior to well water for plants.  Keep in mind our well water is high pH (8.5) with about 350 ppm dissolved solids.  Over time, this causes high pH in the soil, and crusting due to salt build-up from evaporation.  Rainwater is about pH 6, 30 ppm TDS, which means it can be used to leach the soil and reverse the process.  Salinization causes the loss of irrigated farmland, so it’s something to ponder if you want to create a truly sustainable garden/small farm.

    • Thu, Jun 16, 2011 - 07:09pm

      #9
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Ah, finally a subject I have

    Ah, finally a subject I have experience with…:)

    Rain barrels will grow all sorts of nastiness, but I’ve never seen any evidence that it is toxic, i.e. our animals drink from them all the time.  I won’t be testing it on myself, however.  Areas with racoon populations should think long and hard about even using collected rainwater for anything but landscape watering-

    http://dpd.cdc.gov/dpdx/HTML/Baylisascariasis.htm

    A small amount of bleach added to the barrel will keep growth down for a good long time, if the water coming off the roof is NOT “first flush”.   I use 1/4 tsp/gallon.  You shouldn’t be catching that stuff anyway.  Wait til after the first storm of the season, then hook up your barrels, or opt for one of the first flush systems avilable.

    For greenhouse applications, here’s the rule of thumb:  3 gallons per square foot of transparency.  Our greenhouse only has clear siding on the southern side, at a 45 degree angle, allowing maximum off-season sun to heat the black plastic barrels.  If you can set up and fill your barrels in the summer, you will find you have a bit more residual heat, vs. trying to heat them up in the winter.  Black STEEL barrels transfer heat much more efficiently, but I realize the plastic ones are much easier to come by for most people.

    Our greenhouse this past year was a prototype, but it definetly proved the concept.  We had huge tomato plants ready to go out by April, and could have done ever better had we made the greenhouse air-tight at night.  Check this one out-

    http://www.botanic.org/Solar_Energy.asp

    Don’t forget to periodically use the stored water, rotate stock.  That is, if you are using it for something other that thermal mass.

    • Thu, Jun 16, 2011 - 04:56pm

      #6
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      HDPE is vapor-permeable, the

    HDPE is vapor-permeable, the containers “breathe”, so to speak.  That’s probably  the source of the warnings.  We don’t use them for aging beer for this very reason, oxygen permeates the material and causes the beer to go stale.

    Water stored in plastic subject to heat can leach chemicals into the water, regardless of plastic formulation-

    http://www.darienct.gov/filestorage/104/114/163/Plastics_Primer0714.pdf

    If it tastes like plastic, do not drink it.  The smell and taste is coming from SOME amount of contamination.  If you want 100% safety, use 5 or 6 gallon glass carboys or stainless steel containers.  For example, 15 gallon beer kegs are stainless, and will work fine when cleaned and sterilized.  The downside is cost per gallon of water storage.

    We use plastic chemical barrels for rainwater collection for watering.  These barrels have been used for storing zinc solution, but when filled with ultra-pure water and left in the barrels for several weeks, no zinc contamination was detectable, but the water does have a slight plastic odor.  I would only use this water for plants.

    • Tue, Jun 14, 2011 - 06:22pm

      #40
      tictac1

      tictac1

      Status Silver Member (Offline)

      Joined: Sep 25 2009

      Posts: 124

      count placeholder0

      Growing herbs

    Everything in life is far more complicated than it appears at first glance, herbs are no different.

    Before starting an herb garden, consider which herbs you want to grow based on your medical/culinary needs.  Let’s say you’ve decided to grow herb A for it’s medical value.  You will find that herb A also has varieties B, C, and D, each with their own unique essential oil profile.  You will further find that the growing conditions for each variety radically effect essential oil production.

    For example, many herbs produce smaller plants but stronger oils when grown in rocky, dry soil vs. fertile garden soil. 

    Once you’ve grown your herb under ideal conditions for the attributes you want, you still have to get the oils out of the plant.  Sometimes you can simply make tea with it, but often, more complicated extractions are needed, like solvent-based (alcohol tincture), or acid/base extraction.  This is because not all of what we want out of the plants is water-soluble.

    I highly recommend getting a few books on medicinal herbs AND how to use them.  I’m going through two right now, and there is no “one size fits all” application.

Viewing 10 posts - 91 through 100 (of 115 total)