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    • Sat, Nov 21, 2015 - 02:13pm

      #6
      Terry L

      Terry L

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      Joined: Oct 25 2009

      Posts: 24

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      Oops, will try to figure out why the pic didn’t come thru

    Any advice on how to include a picture? Pasting didn't work…

    • Sat, Nov 21, 2015 - 02:07pm

      #5
      Terry L

      Terry L

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      Joined: Oct 25 2009

      Posts: 24

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      I appreciate the advice re active shooter situations…

    This American PPer happened to arrive in Paris just hours after the attacks. I am glad for your advice, thc0655, and will keep it in mind when I'm out in public (and I'm heading out now to get food).

    Below is a pic taken last Monday under the (closed) Eiffel Tower. Anybody know what the guy on the left is carrying? Ammo? Grendades??

    Terry L

    • Sun, Oct 18, 2015 - 01:19am

      #32
      Terry L

      Terry L

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      Circulation of air between the hemispheres

    From what I've read, the mixing of air between the hemispheres happens, of course, but is not as uniform as you might think. Here's a visual display of such:

    If you're interested in ongoing radiation readings in eastern Australia, contact vital1@ozemail.com.au and ask to get on his list. Every month he sends out his Southern Hemisphere Background Radiation Report, with an emphasis on Fukushima's legacy.

    Terry

    • Wed, Apr 15, 2015 - 12:10am

      #4
      Terry L

      Terry L

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      My personal Portland perspective

    Hi Jamie,

    Of course, to gain an accurate understanding of what it's like living in different places would require actually living in a number of them. I can share from my experiences living on west-coast boy all my life (CA, WA, and now OR). The places I've lived have been from LA to Seattle; for the last 37 years I've lived in the Pacific Northwest (which for some people might include northern CA, but that's not part of my experience). I'm happiest here in Portland, where I've been for 25 years. Like Goldilocks might say, it's not too big, and not too small. I love visiting Seattle, as well as Eugene, but Portland fits me best as a place to actually live.

    Does Portland live up to its reputation as a sustainability mecca? I can't really say, as that's not something I've been able to compare. I do know, from my recent travels "down under," that Portland's reputation is known far and wide. I'd suggest possibly Googling something about city sustainability ratings. I do believe that you could do worse, sustainability-wise, in other places.

    The west coast in general has some particular advantages and disadvantages, IMO, as a function of what we're downwind from, as well as upwind from. Pollution from Asia (Fukushima's radionuclides, and mercury from China's coal plants, etc.) reaches us first, and maybe in larger concentrations than further east. On the other hand, we are not downwind from any of the nuclear power plants in the US (a possible exception being the Hanford site in eastern WA, with non-prevailing winds).

    On a more pleasant note, I love how close Portland is to the many beautiful and natural places in and around our state: the Columbia River Gorge, the Oregon Coast, Mt. Hood, the Cascades, etc. I find these places far less crowded (if crowded at all) than similar spots near Seattle. Admitedly, Seattle has the most beautiful views, but the traffic situation there is a real turnoff for us (no pun intended).

    Finally, for now, my wife and I live in a cohousing community (~50 adults), of which there are several such intentional communities in the Portland area (should that be of interest to you, google cohousing Portland). So we feel like we have a leg up on community-based response-ability to whatever the future may have in store.

    Feel free to ask more questions, or for more details on anything I've mentioned. If you'd like a woman's perspective on Portland, let me know and I'll ask my wife to comment.

    Terry L

    • Sat, Jan 31, 2015 - 03:57am

      #14
      Terry L

      Terry L

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      Posts: 24

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      Costco sells grape solar…

    Costco sells grape solar panels/systems last time I checked. Could be a better deal (but I haven't really compared.

    Terry L

    • Wed, Dec 10, 2014 - 04:19am

      #2
      Terry L

      Terry L

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      Joined: Oct 25 2009

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      Addressing pharmaceutical shortages (and more) after TSHTF

    Jeff, I'm glad you brought this up on PP. This certified elder is taking 2 prescription pain meds concurrently, so the question of what to do for pain relief when the pharmaceutical supply chains fail (for whatever reason), is certainly one I've pondered. Beyond stockpiling meds, I didn't have any other ideas… before today.

    What happened today? I received this book I'd ordered: "The Knowledge," subtitled "How to Rebuild Our World From Scratch." Before ordering it, I'd already read a downloaded sample on my Kindle, which was sufficient to convince me of the soundness of the author's impressive credentials and approach. For more info, go to: http://www.amazon.com/Knowledge-How-Rebuild-World-Scratch/dp/159420523X/ref=sr_1_1

    I had yet to open the book at the time I came across your post. But prompted by your dilemma, I found pain relief in the book's index, and felt rewarded by the author's explanations for how various drugs are derivable from plants, including analgesics (e.g., willow bark for salicylic acid, chillis for capsaicin, mint for menthol, and poppies for opium)! I don't know about you, but I'm now more optimistic with regards to post-SHTF pain relief than I was before.

    From what I've read so far, I'd recommend your consideration of this book, and not just for the content on pain relief! As an excerpt from the front flap says: "In The Knowledge, the brilliant British scientist Lewis Dartnell synthesizes a staggering amount of information into nothing less than a step-by-step guide to jump-starting modern technological civilization." I don't think you – or other PPers – will be disappointed.

    Jeff, what other post-SHTF challenges might you be stumped by? Please post! You might be surprised by the potential solutions other PPers could point you to 🙂

    Terry

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)