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    • Wed, Feb 04, 2009 - 04:09pm

      #68

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      Re: Alternatives to a Gun Arsenal in Post Peak America

    he he, pivot.

    Too funny Greg!

    • Wed, Feb 04, 2009 - 03:44pm

      #66

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      Re: Alternatives to a Gun Arsenal in Post Peak America

    Aaron,

    I have heard you suggest training with weapons many times. What does that mean to you?

    I am a hunter at heart, and I reload shotgun, rifle and handgun loads mostly as a hobby. I do it on shotgun because I love to shoot trap and like to customize the load, and save money too. I load rifle in an attempt to get the perfect sub moa combination for my AR15 and hunting rifles. I have a coyote problem and a 400 yard shot is pretty common on those [email protected] It’s more about competing with myself on placement on a clay target or piece of paper in the off season, and a quick kill during hunting. Truth is I hunt more with my bow than I do gunpowder anymore. Something tells me you would say the type of training I am doing is mostly useless for the type of situation you describe.

    I do have my CCW, although I rarely carry. I suppose that will change quickly when TSHTF. I have a range set up at my farm and plink handguns at metal targets at least once a week. I would have to say my tactical skills, while they may be above average, could definitely be improved upon.

    What do you recommend? Do you seek out professional training, and if so what do you look for? Do you gravitate towards training on the rifle, i.e. AR15 or primarily handgun?

    Where my farm is located, I don’t expect to see many "bad  guys". I suppose that type of thinking makes me a target since I am not always alert. I have a lot to protect, so I suppose it’s time I get a little more serious about the tactical side of things. Any suggestions are appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Rog

    • Tue, Feb 03, 2009 - 02:07pm

      #3

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      Re: Thoughts on Potential Plan

    Linda,

    I am not qualified to answer your question. I will tell you, however, what you are proposing is nearly exactly as I have done, only mine was a 401k. I took the money, invested it in my farm, and never looked back. It will be impossible to tell for well over a year if I made the right call financially, but mentally it was one of the best things I did to prepare.

    One key difference is that I made the move in August of last year, prior to the 50% drop. If I had to make the same decision now, it might not be so straight forward. The question you need to have answered for yourself is how confident you are there will be a pop, or will it be a slow fizzle, and you are currently higher than you ever will be again? I tend to subscribe to the fizzle theory, especially since Chris’ last alert about Stocks and Bonds both loosing value simultaneously. This thing appears to be picking up speed, and there is a certain urgency to get your position locked in now, because if a banking holiday or other tumultuous event were to happen tomorrow, your likelihood of being able to make these decisions and changes reduces drastically, and may even be 0. Frozen assets are not really assets at all, are they?

    You are definitely asking the right questions!

    Rog

    • Tue, Feb 03, 2009 - 01:38pm

      #32

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      Re: Biodiesel Basics

     – What latitude?   

    I’m around 37 N. Canola works in a very wide range of latitude, and the CAN in CANOLA comes from Canada, where it was born from rapeseed. It is not the only plant to produce oil, and there may be a better plant for your region.

    Here’s a link to oil production per acre of several different plants. I wish I was close enough to the equator for oil palm!

    http://journeytoforever.org/biodiesel_yield.html

     – My question was rather whether the energy balance is positive, that is the energy value of the BD you get is more than energy put into cultivation and machinery to process the plants. If yes, then this a very good way to harvest solar energy for transportation for example.  

    Yes, the energy balance is positive. I don’t have the hard data in front of me, but I will tell you that there is roughly 120 gallons of oil per acre. That converts to 120 gallons of BD or SVO.

    Assume you plant 20 acres. This results in 2400 gallons of BD. The amount of diesel put into the tractor and generator for tilling, planting, harvesting, pressing, and conversion to BD will be somewhere in the 200 gallons area, most of which actually goes into the generator. So, in terms of net energy, it is positive, very positive. What I am obviously leaving out is the cost of the land, generator, tractor, oil press, combine, labor, etc. Production of the machines clearly took oil. I don’t know how much or how to factor it in, so for my purposes I assume it is all 0 because I have already acquired these items, and my labor is free in a sense. I think Chris would make a valid point that across the board, BD is a lousy replacement for oil, and I think I remember a 3:1 EROEI for BD. He is clearly factoring in all of the things I am not.

    Ultimately, you can look at this as a way to speed up the process of converting sunlight into liquid energy at the surface of the planet. Once processed, BD contains 90% the energy oer gallon of  petroleum based diesel.

     – (as mentioned in the other thread I don’t have most of the options you do in this department, so this is a major concern, but this is off topic here) 

    I realize this will not work for most people, and I do not advocate it as the solution to the problem. It is the solution to mine, at least for the first few years as we all figure this out and come up with long term solutions. By the time I begin to power all this down, I will have all the other things in place that allow for a life with less energy.

    My hope is that even if this does not work for you, you find something better that allows you to feel prepared.

    Best, 

    Rog

    • Tue, Feb 03, 2009 - 03:43am

      #2

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      Re: hypothetical central bank agreement

    Interesting…

    What do you think the representative from China would say at this point in the meeting?

    Rog

    • Tue, Feb 03, 2009 - 03:37am

      #25

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      Re: Biodiesel Basics

    [quote=Damnthematrix]

    Imagine this:  the Big Three go under (only a matter of time); you own a GM/Ford/Chrysler diesel SUV; where will you get parts?  How useful will fuel be for a vehicle that is immoblised because, I dunno, can’t get a replacement injector, or the transmission shits itself, or….

    I fail to see why making bio-diesel should even be mentioned on THIS site which is about economics and the repercussions thereof.  There must be THOUSANDS of sites where you can find out about this stuff without polluting this one. 

    Mike 

    [/quote]

     

    Once again, you’re right. you’re right. I’m clearly out of my mind to think energy has anything to do with ChristMartenson.com.

    So sorry to drag the site down.

    • Tue, Feb 03, 2009 - 03:31am

      #24

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      Re: Biodiesel Basics

    Mike,

    It is a waste of time… to you. On the other hand, a carbon fiber bike is a waste of time to me.

    I genuinely feel you are an interesting guy and have a unique and unconventional perspective on things. Some times I also see you as pretty far off the mark of reality. You have said some pretty outlandish stuff here.

    If you want to challenge me based on fact, premise, or perhaps a better idea, I will always entertain your input and give you the respect you deserve as a member of this community, and one who has been here longer than me at that. Your diatribe about the continued use of cars and chasing efficiency held nothing of value to this discussion, so it has been summarily dismissed because it lacks relevance to what is being discussed. This is not about the efficiency of cars, never has been.

    This is about the ability for a small scale farmer to make biodiesel, and like it or not it works and allows for the production of electricity on days without wind or solar energy. It has the side benefit of allowing a single man to feed a large family through the use of tractors that would otherwise not be available. It assits in building homes for the related "refugees" that may be forced to leave the subdivisions and eventually become part of the permaculture. It also allows for the occasional but necessary (in my case) 3 hour commute to a neighboring city for family and medical reasons. None of these can be performed with your bike. For digging a basement, or cutting down and manipulating trees into the sawmill, or planting and harvesting an acre of potatoes, what gear do you put your bike in? How ’bout when you go pick up the hay bales at the neighbors for feeding the livestock? Do those go on the handlebars, or do you have a bikerack on the back. Or maybe you carry that back a pitchfork at a time while trying to build multiple houses and manage a farm? Tell me how the carbon fiber bike holds up on miles of dirt roads after the county maintenance stops and the roads become a long string of potholes where a road used to be? We can go on and on, but surely your dad schooled you in the merits of using the correct tool for the job, no?

    Perhaps you could open your mind to the fact that not everyone lives in the same situation as you. You don’t have all the answers for all the people. You sure come off strong like you know everything and the rest of us are just ignorant, at some point you may want to learn to take a deep breath before you start typing.

    I doubt anything I could say will have any impact on you whatsoever, but hopefully someone else reading this might not so quickly dismiss an option that may have a real impact for them.

    I’ll let you have the last word here as a retort to this, and then I’ll let it go since we are going no where with this. On the other hand, I look forward to sparring with you in the future over something we both know a little bit about so it is a fair fight.

    Rog

    • Tue, Feb 03, 2009 - 01:06am

      #20

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      Re: Biodiesel Basics

    [quote=Nime]

    Heck, you guys prepare really for a totall and absolute failure of everything. Like becoming a Robinson Crusoe. 

    Some questions:

    – what climate you live in, Roger? I presume the "fuel capacity" of a field of oil crops depends on length of vegetation period and that depends on climate – I wonder if mine is warm enough – plus that impacts the selection of the crop to grow. The key here is to get enough of the stuff to get you through the winter, especially with heating but also transportation.

    – how much this whole process depends on machinery and energy? This whole pressing, stirring, washing etc. consumes energy too.

    – re. "patch of heaven" – assuming everything breaks down etc. are you confident your self-sufficient little heaven won’t be invaded by either people with nothing to loose or an oppresive government? Did you take any steps to increase security? (It is off-topic re. biodiesel, but what point in producing it if someone will tak it away from you)

    (btw: Damnthematrix – you don’t need any individual form of transport? Or are you fine with horse carts?)

    [/quote]

    I am in the Midwest USA. Long summers with a great growing season. Approx 120 gallons per acre of oil per year on an average growing year. 1 acre powers the tractors, the rest goes to electricity and the truck if I need it, which I think will be far less once TSHTF.

    You can make the process completely without machinery, but I don’t think there is much of a point to that.

    Security is always something to consider. Every situation is different. Mine is very good at minimizing the need, but I also have the skills and tools should the need arise. Let’s just say if you come to pay a visit, call ahead.

    Unfortunately, I know I will need some form of transport for family and medical reasons. Horse and buggy just doesn’t get it done for me, but maybe Mike is different.

    Rog 

    • Tue, Feb 03, 2009 - 12:59am

      #19

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      Re: Biodiesel Basics

    Mike,

    You presume far too much about others when you know absolutely nothing about them. What you don’t know about me and my motives could fill a library.

    I would think a learned fella like you would learn some temperance. Suppose you keep the attacks to yourself. They are not welcome. On the other hand, I am always willing to debate and see your side. Who knows, you might even convince all of us that your one, true, superior way is the only way all humans should live!

    I’m gonna go see if I can drive my diesel powered vehicle to the mall to buy a life.

    Rog

    • Mon, Feb 02, 2009 - 10:56pm

      #14

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      Re: Biodiesel Basics

    rncarl, 

    No need to ask forgiveness, it’s a valid point!

    Yes, today Methanol is obtained via a commercial process which converts natural gas. Perhaps you would concede that since Methanol is one of the most simple alcohols, there are many paths to get there, not just the one that uses fossil fuels? Additionally, it is not the only alcohol that can be used in transesterification. Ethanol is another that can be used if sufficiently dry, and can be made with a simple still and any plant life that contains sugar. Everyone hears about corn, but it is far from the only source. While I plan to do it during the day, moonshine is likely in my future for the Ethanol.

    NaOH is yet another item that can be produced at the farm level. It can be made using a very basic setup that converts hardwood ash and water to lye-water, which then becomes lye. It may not be 100% pure, but titration with the base you will be using for transesterification eliminates those headaches. I have lots of hardwood ash as I heat with wood primarily at the farm, and if I run out of stored lye, I can make more as they did 200 years ago to make soap.

    I have bought a patch of heaven because I have the means and desire to do so. BD or SVO is only a portion of my energy strategy, which also includes wind and solar, and I have been studying steam for the last few months as well. If I had a running stream, I’d use Hydro too.

    There are a number of current posts about the significant other not being fully onboard. My method to get my wife onboard was to commit to a soft landing, meaning we still have a wash machine, hot water, air conditioning, etc. While these items may not last forever, it gives my family time to adjust. I have a significant stockpile of diesel as well as methanol and KOH, and consider them nearly as important in my planning as food.

    You make a very valid point about SVO, and I do plan to run it in my tractors and generator during the really hot months to minimize the amount I need to convert. The press I run using the PTO of my tractor. Filtration is obvious. If you use Canola as the feedstock, hat water is all that is needed for degumming, and I can burn wood and glycerin for that. It is not a closed system, but it has it’s merits.

    Finally, I would say that methanol and lye will be available for some time into the future, as we may be at peak everything, but not (yet) at gone everything. Since I have converted assets to gold instead of cash, I am convinced I will have access to the things I need in the future after the initial SHTF. I just have to be prepared for the beginning. If I am wrong about this, BD gies me time to power down at a rate that my family can adapt to. This is my belief, and I understand it may not coincide with yours.

    I appreciate your post, as I too started this thinking it didn’t make any sense long term. I have since changed my mind as while it is not perfect, it is the best I have come up with for a liquid fuel that I can produce now that I know works and depends very little on outside input other than sunshine and rain.

    Rog

     

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