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    • Mon, Nov 09, 2020 - 09:24am

      #2
      rcbaker

      rcbaker

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      Joined: Dec 07 2014

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      Pfizer, BioNTech say Covid vaccine is more than 90% effective

    One problem with this Pfizer vaccine is that it needs to be kept at -80 C, which is too cold for most pharmaceutical refrigeration.

    https://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2020/11/09/vaccine-efficacy-data

    …But the other thing to keep in mind is that this candidate has (so it appears) by far the most challenging distribution of all of them. The Pfizer/BioNTech candidate, last we heard, needs -80C storage, and that is not available down at your local pharmacy. Pfizer has been rounding up as many ultracold freezers (and as much dry ice production) as they can, but there seems little doubt that this is going to be a tough one. I know that the press release talks about getting 1.3 billion doses of this vaccine during 2021, but actually getting 1.3 billion doses out there is going to take an extraordinary effort, because you’re getting into some regions where such relatively high-tech storage and handling becomes far more difficult. Population density is as big a factor as electricity and transport infrastructure. With demanding storage requirements, the more people that are within a short distance of a Big Really Cold Freezer, the better. And the more trucks (etc.) that you have to send down isolated roads to find the spread-out patients, the worse. That’s always the case, but if you’re rushing against dry-ice-pack deadlines the situation is more fraught…

     

    • Tue, Feb 19, 2019 - 01:19pm

      #13
      rcbaker

      rcbaker

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      Industrial colapse as a possible path to survival

     
    It is clear to me that we are a de facto civilization of carbon fuel junkies, who have been handed a corporate civilization and oil powered lifestyle that that feels good, and is one that we will probably not willingly give up.
     
    That means that if we are going to save ourselves, it will probably have to be through an inability to burn all the carbon that we collectively will demand. The one thing that looks like it could realistically do the job of curtailing our carbon consumption in time is an industrial collapse, like a deflationary spiral and world depression.

    My question is to what degree could an involuntary contraction of the global economy save us from killing ourselves through global warming at this point. Does this pencil out as a plausible path to human survival?

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