Forum Replies Created

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 35 total)
  • Author
    Posts
    • Sun, Apr 13, 2014 - 06:08am

      #3
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      Norway House

    Tomas, you are on the wrong website if you asking people here about buying a house in Norway.  First of all, let me compliment you on your success in establishing a highly respected professional business in a foreign culture such as you and your wife have done.  This is not an easy accomplishment, and it is something that many people do not understand.  Secondly, you have a very positive outlook in that you know that your daughter has a great opportunity to flourish, and certainly that has a lot to do with you and your wife making careful economic decisions and looking forward with optimism, not pessimism.

    Norway is an expensive country to live in.  It's energy resources draw in plenty of high quality (expensive) labor and management, and high taxation increase the cost of living.  But, offsetting the high taxes, social forces encourage frugality for the common good.  This is so in all the North Sea countries.  It is a good place to be. It is positive in it's outlook and society.  You have been very successful so far, and you should not be hesitant to deepen your roots in Norway.

    By posing your question on this website, as noted by Wendy Delmater's response, you are asking mainly Americans for their advise.  Unfortunately, America is going through a period of self introspection which is resulting in a great deal of negativity and frustration within it's people.  This negativity and frustration glows fiercely on this website, as I'm sure you will agree if you just stop and think about it for a few minutes.  Do you EVER see anything positive here?  Read the daily digests.  Read carefully the postings.  They don't have anything positive to say about the future of society, only about the future of individuals keeping others from stealing their food and kerosene lanterns.  So do not hang your family's future on answers you might find here.  The answers lie in your heart and that of your wife's.

    I am hopeful that someday soon America will burst through this impasse we've gotten ourselves into.  There are dark forces accumulating on the horizon for us, but we seem to want to hide from those forces rather than oppose them.  Eventually, we'll discover that hiding is not the answer; hopefully it won't be too late.  In the meantime, you should ask yourself if you would not be better off looking elsewhere for advice about how to lead your life in Norway? 

    Best wishes to you and your family.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

       

     

     

     

    • Tue, Jan 28, 2014 - 03:15am

      #4
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      LP Gas prices

    Prices I heard on Saturday is close to $6 a gallon here in N. Wisconsin.  We are fortunate to be heating with wood, so we only fill our LP tank every 24 months, and then in the summer when prices are at their lowest.

    In addition to high prices, deliveries are being limited to 200 gallons at a time.  Of course, that $1200 hit to the wallet would be so painful I'd be glad they stopped at 200 gallons.  A friend who heats with electricity said they cut him off for five hours the other day due to overloaded distribution system.  Seems the high price of LP is driving some folks to use space heaters and such to keep warm. 

    The most frequent explanation for the shortage is that the farmers used up all the LP when they were drying their corn last fall.  I don't have any idea whether that is true.  It's been so cold for so long, it could just be high demand and maybe people going into the season with low tanks.

      

    • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 03:24pm

      #16
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      Critical Path

    For those who would like a glimpse of where society could be headed, instead of collapse, I recommend Buckminster Fuller's "Critical Path".  Written in 1981, before PC's and Internet, Fuller conceptualized the advent of Hi – technology and where it would ultimately take society.  Many of the things he predicted are happening now, we don't notice them so much because of all the noise and chaotic day to day events overshadow and obscure them.

    Younger people won't recognize Fuller.  But he was huge in the 60's and early 70's, very controversial, similar to what Snowden is today.

    It is a difficult, almost tortuous, (at least for myself)  read, but the expanded awareness is well worth the effort, IMHO.

     

    • Sun, Oct 27, 2013 - 02:43am

      #6
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      Prepper life

    Snydeman – A few years ago I was in a similar mode of prepping that you are. I was motivated by the dire forecasts into trying to do something I wasn’t cut out to do, in order to try to protect myself and my family from the impacts of system collapse. After some weeks in the “head for the hills” mode, due to CM’s forecast of impending doom back in early 2011, I reached an epiphany on this Prepper thing. Mainly I realized that there’s more to life than obsessing over how I’m going to stop some guy from stealing my tomatoes when the collapse comes.
    As a result, I developed a different paradigm for system collapse:

    . Such an event, if it occurs, will not be cataclysmic, it will unfold over years, or even decades. Standards of living in our society will degrade in fits and starts. You simply cannot prepare for this in an all encompassing manner, because as events unfold, circumstances change and things which were unforeseen will happen, and things that are expected will not happen. You do the best you can, after weighing the odds of a given scenario actually happening.

    . It is possible that NOTHING will happen at all. All the hand wringing and predicting since 2007, we should be a smoldering ash heap by now. But, instead we have had technological advancement on many fronts, more efficient energy utilization in many aspects of our economy, and overall economic growth, albeit weak, which is normal for a deleveraging world economy.

    . Prepping is a good idea to an extent. Self sufficiency and resilience are important, not only for SHTF scenarios but for ordinary life events, such as job loss, or adverse weather events. The extent that one prepares must match his or her psychology. Some prep because its satisfying to their psyche. If you are doing it with constant expectation or longing for the collapse to come, I believe you are going to be sorely disappointed.

    . There is money to be made in predicting doom and gloom. Always has been. In some ways it has reached religious proportions, with people making horrendous predictions and then telling you that they know how to help you avoid these terrible events. For a fee, of course. This has been going on for ages, long before the internet. The internet simply opens up the channels for accessing people. People who would have ignored such literature down at the bookstore get sucked in by a pop up ad or a scary article posted on a co-conspiring website.

    If you enjoy the prepping that you’re doing, great. But I detect that you are experiencing some kind of let down when the terrible things don’t happen. You may be over prepping. Some of that energy you’re devoting to getting ready for social collapse might be better spent enjoying life.

    • Tue, Aug 13, 2013 - 01:52am

      #15
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      Go for it!

    Absolutely.  If you still have the option to buy the adjacent land, do it.  That will give you the control.  You can always decide to sell it later, but then you are in control of who is going to buy it.  Last thing you want is bad neighbors; it could ruin your dream home. 

    • Thu, Mar 28, 2013 - 07:14pm

      #2
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      Questions

    Good points, AO

    • Thu, Jan 03, 2013 - 05:14am

      #28
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      sucked in

    I'm not saying this website has been sucked in.  I'm saying that preppers that get carried away get sucked in.  A few of the prepper community live the fantasy, looking forward to the day it all comes down.  Some of them are active on this website. 

    Let's look at the past.  This is at least the fifth time the US Government has monetized it's debt since it came into existence in 1789.  Three of the monetizations have happened since 1945 one of which we are currently enduring.  Did the economy collapse in any of those prior monetizations?

    History has plenty of events that are every bit as challenging as the current one.  A few examples:  The War of 1812.  The Civil War.  The two World Wars.  The Cold War.  Even the Reagan recession.  During the 50's, 60's and 70's, one could say that our life expetancy was about 30 minutes; the time it takes for an ICBM to get from there to here.  On many metrics (inflation rate, unemployment, deficit spending) the Reagan double dip recession was worse than the recession of 2008.   Neither our society nor economy collapsed during those events.  There were plenty of doomsayers back in the 70's and 80's, I remember many of their books.  The difference is that there was no internet to spread doubt and panic like there is today. 

    I have been visiting this website for a few years now, and I went through all the phases that many describe on here.  I experienced the concern, fear, despair, anger, etc. etc., that many people here say they went through.  I was planning my prepping down to a T, just like some of the others on these forums.  The low point was after I read the Mormon preparedness manual that someone linked on these forums. 

    It doesn't hurt anyone to take a step back and assess whether they're doing the best thing with their allotted time here on this earth.  To continue down a path because of previously "sunk costs" is a terrible strategy.  The person who started this thread seemed to me to be trying to make that assessment.  My response was to tell him to make sure he understands the reasons and the downsides to going beyond what makes sense for his own needs.  He should not let others tell him what to do, or to scare him into doing things that he wouldn't do if he could step back and put things into perspective.

    Being one of those who grew up in the era of the 30 minute life expectancy, it makes sense to me to have the wherewithal to survive and protect ones loved ones during an extended emergency situation.  That covers the Katrinas and Superstorm Sandys.  In fact I encourage my city dwelling adult children to go somewhat beyond that level of preparedness.  Maybe a little physical PM, and if one is comfortable with it, a firearm and some ammo.  Does this mean that I think that the economy or society is going to collapse?  Heck no. 

    I read somewhere that it is a human tendancy to believe that one is living in the end times.  Our predecessors did it, we do it and our descendants will do it.  It's why the Mayan Calendar and Y2K get traction.

    If you want to believe that things are going to go down the tubes, then go ahead.  I do believe that those that have chosen the extreme prepper path will look back at some point and realize that they've misspent the best years of their lives.  I just hope that if that happens, they don't get angry.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    • Wed, Dec 05, 2012 - 04:04am

      #22
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      too far

    You won’t get much sympathy out of the crowd on this website. 

    Forecasting social and economic collapse has been a big business for decades.  In the ’60’s and ’70’s, there were a proliferation of books about the collapse (that never happened).  Now, the internet makes it easier to get caught up in the hysteria.  And, the web makes it easier for folks to prosper by promoting that hysteria. 

    Eventually those who get sucked into this fantasy fall into two categories – they either come to their senses and get on with life, or they double down and become fanatics that miss life altogether. 

    You are on the right track, nedyne.  Keep a skeptical attitude about all this stuff.  There is a happy medium.

     

     

     

    • Sun, Jun 10, 2012 - 02:51am

      #67
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      Go for it, Jag

    Looking back, I wish my kids had been home schooled.  Don’t get me wrong, the kids turned out fine, but they could have done better if they hadn’t been brainwashed by the politically correct cirriculum.  They were each loaded down with a lot of B.S. that my wife and I didn’t catch until much too late to do anything about.  The kids are now in their 30’s and 40’s and have seen the light.  But they’ve lost 20 years getting there.

     

    • Sun, Jun 10, 2012 - 02:37am

      #12
      osb272646

      osb272646

      Status Bronze Member (Offline)

      Joined: Mar 14 2010

      Posts: 42

      count placeholder0

      Simple

    Actually, this is quite simple.  Many people have lost their jobs and they’re not going to get them back.  So, gas consumption has declined because they don’t have to get in their car and drive to work.  Whether it’s a Hummer or a Prius.

    Look at Buckminster Fuller predictions.  He said this would happen.

     

     

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 35 total)