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    • Sat, Oct 06, 2012 - 04:17pm

      #3

      mooselick7

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      Good thinking…

    Couple of thoughts…

    Two cats side by side but top-and-bottom opposite or opposing slices of bread would be a far more balanced system.  Im thinking this system will fly apart without something to slow it down.  (would be messy, ew.)   So make sure you heat a swimming pool in the artic for the excess load. 

    Im thinking you will need inventions #1 and #5 to keep the cats in good mental shape and invention #2 for remote locations.  http://www.cracked.com/article_15693_the-10-most-ridiculous-inventions-e…

    Thanks for the laugh this a.m….

     

     

     

    • Mon, May 14, 2012 - 10:54pm

      #7

      mooselick7

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      My 20 won’s worth…

    I agree with all of the above with added commentary.  

    Dogs – I too thought the end was nigh and have been surprised at the economies ability to plod along.  And have been adding resilience to our lifestyle for seemingly no reason….

    Ready – I agree with your point of view.  Location, location, location.  Look at things in terms of the essentials:  water, food, shelter, heat, light, security.   

    Looking at my essentials, my property has:

    –  Water:  5 sources – gravity fed irrigation, town fed irrigation system, town municipal water supply, rainwater collection and a major stream within 4 city blocks.  We have gravity filter and ways to carry the water around.  

    –  Food:  1 1/2 acres in very small mountain town.  Zone 3.  Excellent soil.  Added garden space, a greenhouse, chickens, fruit trees and rabbits.   Confident that I could keep my wife and daughter fed in a crisis and really Im only using about 25% of the total ground.   We could plant about 35% more but, 1) I dont have time with a full time job.  2)  My neighbors would complain.  3)  It would lower my property values.  

    During this process, my biggest obstacles have NOT been space but neighbors!  We are surrounded on all sides by neighbors and a town that doesnt want their residents to have anything but dogs, cats and goldfish.  We have had to fight town hall on animal ordinances.  I swear they want to turn a cowboy town into a gated community.  

    I have spent hundred of dollars building up fences etc for an overpopulation of deer fed by the neighbors that tear up everything and antagonize me as a walking illegal protein source.   We could have milk goats on our plot but the neighbors wouldnt accept that.   

    Also, the neighbors plant trees that shade my property.  They plant them for looks not food production.  

    Need to think about food storage, prep and processing.  I am in the process of designing and replacing an old deck that will also serve as a shaded cooking, canning and butcher area complete with a grill, backyard oven/smoker, plenty of counter space and easy hose down cleanup.   I have plans to build a cellar and have learned how to store and pickle vegetables for long term.  

    –  Shelter:  a sturdy, well insulated, stickbuilt home that needs more cosmetic work but the structure will easily outlive me.

    –  Heat: three sources – Locally available stoker coal or wood pellet and two wood/coal stoves.  Have enough firewood from cutting down old trees on the place for a winter but plenty of firewood within 10 miles of house.  Ability to cook with grid electric, propane or wood.  

    –  Light:  grid electricity, propane, very small solar system – enough to charge a laptop, run a small appliance or have some light to work or read by, PTO generator and a couple of white gas lanterns.  All but the solar system was purchased 2nd hand.

    –  Security:  My problems with the neighbors are an advantage in this area.  My surrounding neighbors are mostly retired folks (nosey) who are up at all hours of the night and have a sincere fasination with what goes on around our place.   They watch out for us and I watch out for them.  The town has it’s share of potential victims if the lights go out but is more full of self reliant folk with kind of a self governing ethic.  

    Where Im vulnerable is animal protein and fats.   Altho I live in cattle country,  I would like more land to raise a few livestock for milk and meat.  

    I offer this for you to understand the process thus far.  

    Here are a few considerations:

    –  How is your health?  Are you in shape?  Can you perform manual labor for 8 to 30 hours a week?  My wife can’t but I can. Need to be able to till, rake, seed, water, weed, harvest, prep, preserve, store, cook and eat what you grow.   Im the bread winner so our production is based on what I can do in my spare time.  Also, can you handle being outside all day.  Consider the work clothing, etc to adapt to the sun, wind and exposure to the weather in your area.

    – Look at your new location in terms of production not consumption.   Will the location produce with as little cheap energy as possible? 

    –  Water is key.  Look for water sources – preferrably multiple.  Without water, you will die.  You will be unclean.  You will spend lots of valuable energy to get it, store and conserve.  Without water, there will be no food production.  Use Google Earth to check out land and nearby water sources.  Find land next to water.  If it has a well, find out how you can pump it without power.  There are many sources for this.  I would start searching on the internet for “solar water pumping” , “wind water pumping”, “rainwater collection” and “hand water pumps”.  They arent cheap but you are dead without it.  There are many site specific considerations here.  PM me if you want some advice.  

    –  Food production needs water, soil, light and security first then space.   Also consider your tastes – can you handle a diet that is based on the season and varieties you can grow in your region.   Recently, I toured S. Korea with a group of 30.  Out of the 30, 3 were native Koreans.  Part of the deal was to eat only Korean food out of respect for the culture.  There were fresh, local vegies, rice, fish, meat, fruits, seaweed, mushrooms and even silkworms on the menu.  Out of the Anglos, one other besides myself enjoyed the food. The others did nothing but complain and were appalled that I loved it – despite being Type 2 diabetic, my sugars were normal, ate like a pig 3x a day, had incredible vigor, sat on a bus most of the time and lost 8 lbs – how does that work?

    You can grow A LOT in a small space.   Learn about the covents, laws or ordinances for your potential location for keeping animals or landscaping.  Dont assume that you can start planting or raising animals because peak oil is just around the corner – neighbors will likely NOT hold the same opinion.  I agree with the opinion that it takes about 10 years to develop a garden that can feed you with little effort.  

    Read “How to Grow more Vegetables”  and “The Resilient Gardener”.

    http://www.amazon.com/Grow-More-Vegetables-Eighth-Edition/dp/160774189X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337031684&sr=1-1

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Resilient-Gardener-Production-Self-Reliance/dp/160358031X

    If in Zone 4 or less, read:   

    http://www.amazon.com/Four-Season-Harvest-Organic-Vegetables-Garden/dp/1890132276/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337031771&sr=1-4

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Winter-Harvest-Handbook-Greenhouses/dp/1603580816/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_b

    Soil building is fairly cheap but hard work.  It takes a lot of cheap nitrogen rich organic matter, a lot of shoveling and a lot of digging.   A place where you can keep animals will help greatly.  Chickens, goats, cows, sheep and pigs can be used to clear and enrich soil if managed correctly. Find others in your region who are living off the land.  

    Read everything by Joel Salatin.  Research about permaculture techniques.  Read about biodynamics – this is my favorite: http://www.amazon.com/Biodynamic-Farm-Growing-Wholesome-Food/dp/0911311459/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337031939&sr=1-3 

    Read The Good life:  http://www.amazon.com/The-Good-Life-Nearings-Self-Sufficient/dp/0805209700/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337032047&sr=1-1

    Read or listen to the book Farm City for inspiration.  http://www.amazon.com/Farm-City-Education-Urban-Farmer/dp/0143117289/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1337031880&sr=1-1

    As far as shelter, it depends on what you are willing to sacrafice.   I can live in a teepee.  Wifey cant.   I would put priority on land, light, soil and water and less priority on a McMansion.   With food production, you will be spending more time outside and less time in the house.   Smaller means less expense for everything from heat to solar electricity.  

    Consider the tiny house movement.  Quality of space over quantity…. 

    As fuel prices go higher, RVs are getting cheaper:  http://www.amazon.com/Dirt-Cheap-Survival-Retreat-Mans-Solution/dp/1581607474

    Or with the global shutdown of imported goods, shipping containers are becoming more and more available:  http://gracie-senseandsimplicity.blogspot.com/2011/05/shipping-container-homes-6-inspiring.html

    Heat:  Look for multiple sources of locally available heat.  Wood is obvious but you are going to need all the storage and equipment to take care of it.   Splitting wood is hard work.   Propane can be stored almost indefinitely.  Consider superinsulation, rammed earth or earth shelter homes with solar heating.   A small woodstove can heat an underground house with very little wood.

    Light:  Learn about solar photovoltaics.   A $250 system can give you enough light to work or read by at least 4 hours in the evening and charge up radios or laptops.  Look for kerosene lanterns, camping lantern at garage sales.   Safely store the fuel for them.   

    Security:  Keep in mind that you can go without all of the above for days to weeks; but, you cant go without security for a second.   

    Being remote is a dual edge sword.  Too remote and no one would be there to protect you.  But, it also means there is no one will be there to protect someone threatening you either.  Also under this heading is medical attention.  If you are out splitting wood, the ax slips and hacks into your leg, how far are you from the ER?  How will you get there?

    Read Ferfal’s blog and book:  http://www.themodernsurvivalist.com/  as well as Dmytri Orlov’s blog and book:  http://cluborlov.blogspot.com/.   These guys have seen collapse first hand and talk about the practicalities of security.  Location is key here.  Cheap land prices can mean a destitute and desperate surrounding population.  Cheap land also means low taxes which means less money for law enforcement.   Remote land mean a long response time if you are threatened.

    A good guard dog can help but that is easily mitigated.   You may be better off with a nervous pomeranian to warn you and be a smaller target.   Think about what measures and skill you will take if your property or health is threatened – then equip and train yourself accordingly.  Not the other way around…

    Do your research.  Save your money and keep your eyes open for deals on all of the above.  Property values are dropping.  Build your resilience.  Build your skills.  Build your strength and stamina.  Plan for hell, enjoy the moment and take advantage of the cheap energy while it is available.

    Hope this helps…

     

     

     

     

    • Tue, Sep 06, 2011 - 08:53pm

      #14

      mooselick7

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      ao wrote:mooselick7

    [quote=ao]

    [quote=mooselick7]

    Bare in mind, that biodynamics is all about getting your head out of the internet, the computer and the entire un-natural world.  And, getting it into the natural, ethreal and yes, spiritual world.  So, the great biodynamics people have minimal internet contact to maximize their time in nature. 

    [/quote]

    Thanks for the tips Mooselick.  I look forward to investigating it.

    Your statement above has a lot of truth to it.  I feel for folks who live in urban areas and have minimal to no contact with nature.  There’s a peace and calm that one obtains by slipping away from man’s peripatetic pace to the soothing rhythms of nature that is difficult to achieve in any other way.  

    [/quote]

    That’s a big 10-4, Rubber Duck…

     

    • Mon, Sep 05, 2011 - 11:11pm

      #12

      mooselick7

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      This year was my first in

    This year was my first in biodynamic gardening and, bear in mind, this is from an enginerd, I am very impressed with the results!  The vegies had a lot less bugs, grew with more vigor, more foliage and taste better.    I think the entire property benefitted from the preps.

    Bare in mind, that biodynamics is all about getting your head out of the internet, the computer and the entire un-natural world.  And, getting it into the natural, ethreal and yes, spiritual world.  So, the great biodynamics people have minimal internet contact to maximize their time in nature. 

    I would start with Hugh Lovel’s book, Biodynamic Farm. http://www.amazon.com/Biodynamic-Farm-Growing-Wholesome-Food/dp/0911311459/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1315263405&sr=1-1

    Then get a Biodynamic calendar to plant by moon.  This is the best one. I found the planting by the moon to be liberating on many levels.  http://www.amazon.com/American-Biodynamic-Sowing-Planting-Calendar/dp/0863157564/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1315263334&sr=8-1

    Next, I would order up some preps from Josephine Porter.  Also she can provide some online counselling.  http://www.jpibiodynamics.org/

    Next, watch How to Save the World for inspiration.  http://www.amazon.com/How-Save-World-Barbara-Sumner-Burstyn/dp/B000MTOWXA

    After that I would just do it.  Dont worry about not getting it just right.  It is really simple.  I did more thinking and worrying about it that just doing it.  Then work toward developing your own preps….

        Double, double toil and trouble;
        Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
        Fillet of a fenny snake,
        In the caldron boil and bake;
        Eye of newt, and toe of frog,
        Wool of bat, and tongue of dog,
        Adder’s fork, and blind-worm’s sting,
        Lizard’s leg, and owlet’s wing,—
        For a charm of powerful trouble,
        Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
        Double, double toil and trouble;
        Fire burn, and caldron bubble.
        Scale of dragon; tooth of wolf;
        Witches’ mummy; maw and gulf
        Of the ravin’d salt-sea shark;
        Root of hemlock digg’d i the dark;
        Liver of blaspheming Jew;
        Gall of goat, and slips of yew
        Sliver’d in the moon’s eclipse;
        Nose of Turk, and Tartar’s lips;
        Finger of birth-strangled babe
        Ditch-deliver’d by a drab,—
        Make the gruel thick and slab:
        Add thereto a tiger’s chaudron,
        For the ingrediants of our caldron.

     

     

     

     

     

    • Mon, Sep 05, 2011 - 08:10pm

      #10

      mooselick7

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      Ponder this…

    Here are 6 points to ponder…

    First, consider where you call home.  If you have lived in a particular area for any length of time, then you have established relationships, roots and connections.  You know the lay of the land.  You know the advantages and disadvantages of that community.  That is capital that you CAN NOT buy or develop quickly!

    If you are in an urban environment, then it is prudent to get away from it.  But, just like I would’nt be safe or comfortable in the streets of a major metro city, you shouldnt assume that you will be safe or comfortable in rural Wyoming.  Even in the least populated per land area state in the lower 48, there are still security dangers both natural and man-made. 

    Second, if you insist on moving, consult a hardiness zone map.  http://www.hardiness-zone-map.com/  The lower the number the more difficult your gardening life will be.   I live in Zone 3.  On an acre and half, I have an unheated 22×48 ft greenhouse full of cool season/warm season vegetables, rabbits, chickens, 14 apple trees, chokecherries,  cherries, pears, currants, rasberries and aspargras.  All this is done biodynamically.  Im confident that I can grow our own food for a family of 3.  However, it takes a lot of work.  It is pretty much a full time job for one person.

    Third, narrow down your location choices in the hardiness zone that you are comfortable in to properties with 1) good water 2) good sun and 3) Good soil.  You can build up soil.  You can work around indirect sunlight.  You CAN NOT build or work around lack of good water.   Use http://www.landandfarm.com or http://www.tulia.com to look at properties.

    Fourth, talk to gardening clubs, county extension agents, master gardeners, local organic and biodynamic growers in the area you are considering.  Ask about early/late frosts, hail, wind, too much rain, too little rain, what crops do best, what crops fail…

    Fifth, consider total nutrition.  If you think you are going to live on a vegan diet in this part of the country, you are dreaming.  Study the website: http://www.wapf.org.   There is NO way without a host of degenerative diseases that I could work the garden without grass fed animal protein and fats.

    Sixth, it takes a good solid 10 years of gardening and husbandry experience of a particular soil and climate to raise food intensively in a small space in amounts generous enough to sustain one person or a family.   My mother-in-law has been raising her own food on a suburban city lot all her life.  It can be done.  But she has 70 years of experience doing it.  Now at 78 years, she cant do it anymore.

     

     

     

     

     

    • Sun, Aug 21, 2011 - 04:22pm

      #16

      mooselick7

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      Sad

    I’m a member of Collapsenet, have read all of Ruppert’s books and watched his videos.

    Before this video, I had sent a few messages asking him to drop the see-I-told-you-so’s out of his comments. This video was his answer to those requests.

    In the comments section of the video, you will see many members (including my myself) letting him know our feelings on this. A few have dropped their subscriptions. I suspect that he will read those comments and cool it. I would not enjoy being on the receiving end of those comments. It would be a humbling experience – even for Mike.

    One thing I have learned in getting to know some of the publicly known peak oil folks both online and personally, is that they are all human. They are far from perfect.

    Mike is far from perfect but he provides analysis from a perspective that I have not found elsewhere. Not only does he provide insight on trends in economic, environmental and energy. He provides insight on geopolitical trends, shadow government tactics, shadow economic forces and covert operations. (You know, conspiracy fact we cant discuss here.)

    At the end of the day, we will continue on being human.

    • Thu, Jun 23, 2011 - 03:59am

      #6

      mooselick7

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      SteveW wrote:mooselick7

    [quote=SteveW]

    [quote=mooselick7]

     Altho I believe the shutdown will place more power in the big players who manipulate the PM prices, eventually, the demand for physical will prevail when the illusion of fiat falls [/quote]

    Not sure whether this is true. Since the OTC is a black box any visible trades on COMEX can be offset OTC, or COMEX manipulation could exist merely for OTC profits.

    [/quote]

    The “black box” is where TPTB (big players) manipulate price and fleece the sheeple.  

    Physical is manipulated with paper.  Paper ie OTC, ETF, ECT and fiat.  is a promise of physical.  If that promise can not be fulfilled then those who have physical will have real value and those that have paper will have nothing. 

    Then the illusion of that promise will fail and that which you hold in your hand will pay for other goods and services of real value.   We will see the REAL value of physical metal versus fiat.

    • Mon, Jun 20, 2011 - 05:58pm

      #4

      mooselick7

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      There are a few other

    There are a few other discussions about this…

    here is one from Turd’s site:  (I know the name doesnt lend much credibility)

    http://www.tfmetalsreport.com/blog/turd-confused/591

    Im feeling better now because it relates more to paper than physical.  Altho I believe the shutdown will place more power in the big players who manipulate the PM prices, eventually, the demand for physical will prevail when the illusion of fiat falls 

    Problem is that govtments tend to steal (confiscation), plunder (tax) and destroy (war) when nobody wants to play their games anymore.

    • Mon, Jun 06, 2011 - 11:04pm

      #29

      mooselick7

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       Now here’s another way to

     Now here’s another way to look at it.

      If SHTF then TPTB are going to want the sheeple sedated. 

    So what better way than to nationalize the subsidized corn to ethanol industry into a giant bootlegging machine.   All those little bottles of grog are going to be worthless with booze on tap in every home. 

    Watching the world go to hell would be like drinking and chasing women… the view gets more beautiful by the shot…

     

    • Mon, Jun 06, 2011 - 07:26pm

      #26

      mooselick7

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      You guyz are driving me to

     

     

     

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