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    • Wed, Mar 27, 2019 - 05:17am

      #4

      LynnFogwell

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      Joined: Apr 15 2013

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      Cheap Y adaptors

    I have had problems in the past with these Y adaptors cracking, from generally being cheap. I have looked for better quality ones but cannot find them. This one will not crack due to ice because there is no water in it. Shut off water, open overflow ball-valve to drain it.

    • Thu, May 17, 2018 - 12:12am

      #22

      LynnFogwell

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      The best book I have found on permaculture

    The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach: Ben Falk: 8601200664270: Amazon.com: Books

    This book was recommended to me by a permaculture expert who I was lucky enough to become acquainted with. The author, Ben Falk, started his homestead around seven years ago, on 10 acres of worn out land on a Vermont hillside. He has turned it into a lush food forest.

    The greatness of this book is in its organization. Mr. Falk begins with general concepts and goals of regenerative farming and permaculture. He then goes into all major topics around permaculture, in the order that you want to address them. For each topic, he gives an overview and refers you to more exhaustive information. He then discusses how he applied these ideas to his farm. He gives valuable insights into what did and didn’t work for him. He is quick to say that a number of things that he read, did not work out for him. He also guesses at reasons why. He is encouraging in experimenting and with gaining confidence with knowing your own land. Every homestead is different.

    The book could be considered a textbook on the subject of permaculture and resiliency, complete with test assessments at the end of the book. The book can also be considered extremely practical because of his application of the concepts to his own farm. There are lots of color pictures and diagrams. After reading it, I find myself referring back to it often. 

    Since reading this book, I have installed a pond and swales (on contour). I have cut down a number of trees (pines) for garden sunlight, and used the wood to build 200 feet of heugelkultur mounds along my driveway. I have one acre in Raleigh, NC and am thrilled to see my budding food forest. Favorite quote in the book:

    The best time to plant a tree is twenty years ago. The second best time is now. (Japanese Proverb)

    I almost never comment, but I thought I could contribute something here.

    I do not think this is not an issue of balancing authoritarian control vs. freedom. It is an issue of who decides. 

    I have read some thought examples here of people owning nuclear submarines or high explosives. The government owns these things and people seem to be ok with it. The government is ultimately a group of people. In fact, we say (in the U.S) that we have a government “of the people, by the people and for the people”. This would imply that any weapon that the government owns, the people should also be able to own.  

    So, what is it about the government owning nuclear submarines that makes it ok? If a group of citizens demonstrated those same safeguards, then would you not be ok with that too? I take the threat of these kinds of weapons seriously. It is true that a strong threat of force is indeed force. Somone owning explosives in the apartment above you would seem to be a sufficient threat to constitute aggressive force. This is because the consequences would be so devastating if something went wrong. Notice that remains true whether or not it is a private person or an agent of the government.

    With freedom comes responsibility and the ownership of very destructive weapons come with a boatload of responsibility. There are, in fact, weapons that I am not comfortable with anyone having – including the government.

    Getting back to the issue of deciding, I am not sure government liscensing is adequate. Driver’s liscenses seem to be a joke to me. Anybody can get one and they are more about being an ID than demonstrating any level of driving profeciency. I also think the government would have a conflicting interest in restricting liscenses.

    Here is a license example I could get behind: While visiting New Zealand, I spoke to a resident there who told me you had to get signatures from your neighbors to be permitted to own a gun. He said your neighbors had to sign that they were comfortable with you owning a weapon. I don’t know the specifics of the NZ law, but I really liked that idea. Your neighbors are the most effected and (like a jury) are in the best position to judge if you are responsible enough to own a weapon. This is a great use of community and demonstrates its importance!

    I would have no idea how to license explosives, but it would revolve around providing plenty of liability insurance, demonstrating responsible storage and training, accounting for security, and – of course those signatures from your neighbors! 🙂

    Thanks to everyone for their posts, I enjoy reading posts from thoughtful people!

     

    • Sat, Jan 11, 2014 - 11:04pm

      #2

      LynnFogwell

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      Joined: Apr 15 2013

      Posts: 11

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      Recommended Book

    I might have something to contribute here. I am from North Carolina and have been living in China for a year and a half. My wife works with a Chinese telecom company where she is (I think) the only westerner in her building. I have a good bit of contact with Chinese people and am learning Manadrin (I just passed my level II HSK test). Learning the language helps you understand the subtlies of their culture.

    I have lived abroad before but this is the only place that gets stranger the longer I live here. The more I learn about the Chinese, the more surprised I become. These folks are very different from me.

    The book I would recommend you read is Poorly Made In China, by Paul Midler. He has lived in China for decades and speaks fluent Chinese. He began working with Western importers when the boom began and he has dozens of stories that are all fascinating. His book is a collection of these stories. The book is convincing because you see common traits and themes across all of these disparate businesses. Instead of just stating that the Chinese don't care about written contracts, you see it repeated through completely different products and situations. 

    Everything in this book rings true in my dealings with the Chinese people. The book is good in not judging, but some of the Chinese assumptions and values shocked me. Mr. Midler was once asked why he wrote this book. He said he had never really thought about it but finally told the reporter that 'it needed to be written'. I will agree. If you have dealings in China, this book needs to be read.

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