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    • Mon, Jan 11, 2021 - 09:10pm

      #12
      jbuck

      jbuck

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      Reply To: Governor French Laundry Under Fire

    “They will all be really pissed off.”

    Dave – I agree.  But I’m a high school teacher.  I have to take a step back from my students and think about their parents/guardians (see what I did there).  When they figure out the narrative is bunk:

    first, most of them will not think about it that way; they will just know something makes them pissed off.

    second, nobody wants to tell the world they have been had, so they will not cry out in a way that is “heard round the world.”  No, they will shoot the messenger (me, or maybe my principal or a district functionary – if they are well connected, their ire might be directed at someone who actually matters in terms of decision making).

    We have been set against each other as opposing factions in a way that guarantees that we destroy each other and ourselves even as many of us see the real problem/enemy.  Maybe the human race has been through this enough times for me to hope for a different outcome but …

    (I was joking with another teacher that I’m a post-jaded white man. He is too, and an art teacher, so we had a good laugh.)

    Super frustrating to know what to say but have nobody in a position to hear it.  The band just plays on … I want off this ride!!! (a sentiment from a pre-jaded me at an amusement park;-).

    Khotso, pula, nala,

    (peace, rain, prosperity – that’s southern Sotho and I like it so I use it – cultural appropriation, I know)

    jeff

    • Tue, Jul 21, 2020 - 10:41am

      #27
      jbuck

      jbuck

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      lol

    @Chris – I like your 3 point layout of the problem but I had to laugh at “Teachers seem to be most at risk due simply to age…”  Not that this is incorrect in general but in my district, many of our teachers are not a lot older than our students – I sometimes have a hard time distinguishing new teachers from our senior students in the hallway.  But I’m an old(ish) fart.  Just over 10% of our teacher corps (about 5,500) has 15 or more years of experience.  I’m one of them, getting ready to start year 22 and I came to teaching late so I’m older than similarly experienced teachers.  (teacher demographics vary wildly from district to district in the US)

    Any way, as I mentioned above, I’m directly and deeply involved in the back to school conversation both at my school and in the district.  I agree that good data are critical.  I also think that data eventually need to lead to hypotheses and theories with some explanatory power.

    For example, I have been resistant to the idea that “kids don’t transmit the virus to each other or to adults” (that’s what our district told us – without data or any explanation as to why that might be).  This flies in the face of what everybody “knows” about little kids who have on these pages been described as “walking petri dishes” and “little germ factories”.  It’s not what you don’t know that gets you into trouble.  It’s what you know for sure that ain’t so. – Mark Twain

    The article in the OP gave me a missing piece of the puzzle.  I had no idea of the age difference in the prevalence of ACE2 receptors (did I even write that correctly?  Is it ACE2 or ACEII?).  This is information my local and my district could share with our community so they can incorporate it into their understanding of what is going on.  Better informed thinking leads to better discussion, decisions and outcomes for everyone.  And when we have no actual information or ideas to talk about, we often just point fingers at each other.  That’s worse than useless.

    Someone brought up the purpose of public education earlier.  That’s really interesting because if you go back and look at what the people putting together our current system wrote about, you might be quite surprised.  You might also check out authors like John Taylor Gatto and the woman who worked in the DoE who’s name escapes me at the moment (I’ll edit this when I have time to go look it up.  It’s not Diane Ravitch – she did a lot of damage before she figured it out and switched sides).  She describes schools as Skinner Boxes.  Search “dumb down” and you’ll find plenty to think about.

    I feel like I should describe myself as a cryto-educator, at least an under cover thinker.  My motto is “proceed until apprehended” (thank you Florence Nightingale) and my agenda is to teach kids how to access information and to think critically about it.  One might also be surprised to hear this decidedly has me swimming against the tide of “education reform” in this country.  (Ask me about the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation sometime and what they were up to before GAVI.  I had a front row seat.)

    jeff

    • Mon, Jul 20, 2020 - 06:34pm

      #21
      jbuck

      jbuck

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      Reply To: Is there anyone around that wants to help debunk?

    I saw that too over on the Daily Market Update (thanks JAG).  I got so excited, I sent it to my principal and admin team and my union peeps.  (full disclosure, I am a member of my local’s bargaining team and have been deeply involved in the return to school conversation since May – and just so you know, I don’t get paid for what’s now in the hundreds of hours of focused work on that topic – I should also add that my local and my district have a relatively productive working relationship).

    So many people (teachers, students, and their parents) are demanding mandatory testing.  Ironically, I’m pretty libertarian (left) minded – I know, right?!  What’s an aspiring Agorist doing in socialist organizations like unions and public schools?  Long story for another place.  Buy me a beer. 😉  I will never support mandatory testing and if the FDA pulls their collective finger out and approves this, it could for sure be a game changer.

    But then, I thought that about HCQ (which I’m disposed to feel OK about since I lived in Africa for 3 years and took actually nasty prophylaxis = Mefloquine).

    jeff

    • Mon, Jul 20, 2020 - 05:11pm

      #18
      jbuck

      jbuck

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      Is there anyone around that wants to help debunk?

    I thought that was an interesting article.  It does not seem like bunk to me so …

    I am a public high school teacher.  First, I can assure you that during remote learning, we were not and will not be just “sitting around and getting paid.”  It was more difficult, frustrating work and, in my experience, much less likely to lead to positive learning outcomes for students (I do know the purpose of the education system).  We will start back remote in August.  I would much rather go back to school … AND I want to be safe.  I want my students to be safe too … AND self-preservation is a thing.

    (Incidentally, 120 is the number they’re talking about for high school in my district.  In my career, I’ve had teaching loads as high as 180 – even higher is not uncommon in urban districts , so that sounds pretty nice to me).

    Second, if you’re going to equate schools with hospitals and police departments, why not equate bars and restaurants too?  By that logic, everyone needs to just deal and we should not have closed anything.  That’s a valid POV but it seems like you could just state that rather than bashing teachers.  In any case, people who work in hospitals know they will be around sick people.  Cops know that they will face dangerous situations.  I have both in my family and I can assure you, they are well aware of what they got into.

    Now, from the article – I finally got what I’ve been looking for – an actual mechanism to explain why younger kids might be a “viral dead end” which conflicts with my experience of them being snotty all fall and winter with colds and flu.  I was interested to read about the relative lack of ACE2 receptors in pre-teens.

    I wonder about other routes of infection?  If the virus gained entry to cells (t-cells? are there other entry points?) but not through ACE2, could that present differently in kids?  Could that be the cause of the mystery illness reported in younger people that “may be linked to Covid-19” (and that I haven’t heard about in a while)?  Maybe that was addressed but it was a long article and I’ll admit I didn’t read all the way to the end.

    It also looks like high schoolers are different.  There are definitely stories about outbreaks at athletics camps, etc. around here but I cannot remember reading about any problems with younger groups of kids (relying on memory here, not research of the headlines).

    just my $0.02

    jeff

    • Wed, Jul 15, 2020 - 09:19pm

      #3
      jbuck

      jbuck

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      Mosquito transmission of Covid

    I’ve been wondering about that myself since Chris reported evidence that the virus inserts itself into hemoglobin (liberating Fe +2 and +3 if I recall maybe explaining or at least contributing to micro-clotting and scarring in the lungs – do I remember that right?).

    I’ve had malaria twice – contracted it in Maputo in ’96.  I remember the fucker that bit me because it was “winter” in the southern hemisphere and there weren’t many mosquitos.  Relapsed a year later at home in USA.  That was my first “it’s just the flu” experience.  Finally found a “travel medicine” specialist who prescribed meds for travelers and told me direct, “Wow, I’ve never seen an actual case of malaria before.”  Confidence swells … long story but he eventually “treated me empirically” because they couldn’t figure out how to get blood at the right time … but anyway, it hasn’t recurred since. (if you need to know, test g6pd then take Fanzidar – NOT medical advice and don’t take that stuff if you don’t have to – always use other treatments your doctor tells you first)  As far as I know, my liver is OK but I don’t do it any favors, if you know what I mean (looking  Mr C2H5OH optometrist, I feel ya).

    I understand the difference between a parasite and a virus, but it still makes me wonder.

    • Mon, May 14, 2018 - 08:24pm

      #4
      jbuck

      jbuck

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      I got one!

    I have the sense that most people who hang around here have at least recognized the limits of the reductionist paradigm.  A great introduction to the replacement paradigm is  Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella Meadows (one of the Limits to Growth authors)

    Along similar lines, I found The Web of Life by Fritjof Capra a very accessible introduction for anyone transitioning from a reductionist world view to a systemic one.  He’s one of the Bioneers folks now.  I hear is newer book, The Systems View of Life is good but I have not read it myself.

    And since foodies and permies made the list, I was surprised not to see any titles by Joel Salatin, especially since he’s been a guest.  I haven’t read all of his books so you can pick one.

    There, after lurking here for so many years I finally pulled the trigger on a comment!  Just before you’re coming to my home town of Denver … and I won’t be here that day 🙁  

    jeff

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