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    • Thu, May 28, 2020 - 12:48am

      #7
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Reply To: Why this doc thinks the Lancet report is fake

    Hi agitating prop,

    Good question. What is missing in this possibility is infectivity. If it was covid, many more elderly would have died due to the same symptoms as they are dying of now. So it is highly unlikely that it was covid.

    take care.

    • Thu, May 28, 2020 - 12:37am

      #8
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Calling All PP Parents — Your Input Needed!

    Hi Adam,

    I assume that this is for Americans right? Although I do not like generalizations wrt people, I noticed, and experienced, huge cultural differences. The society we live in dictates, to a certain extend, our belief system, the advices we get and give. These “soft boundaries” set by our countries society , are not about right or wrong, or about being good parents or bad parents.

    I’m Dutch, and my son is 21. From his birth till his 4th year we lived in Asia. In the expat community, Dutch raising habit were pretty soon subject of reoccurring discussions: compared to other babies and toddlers, Dutch babies/toddlers were usually easy to handle, and parents comparatively stress free. The trick? Regularity. A strict sleeping schedule  so that we, the parents had time for ourselves, and the baby was typically well rested (better rested than other babies for sure). What I also noticed is that we allowed our child to be bored. We only had a few planned activities in the week compared to parents from other countries. In our discussions with our foreign friends it became quickly clear that this had to do with the belief that “brains” need to be stimulated to ensure the child best changes in the educational system, while we, believed that a child has to develop its own interests and discover its own abilities and creativity. The best way for this is to let them be bored: amazing things (can) happen with a child when he/she is bored, especially if you let them. Of course there were many foreigners who had the same ideas, but typically it is easier to implement this ideas in a likeminded environment. And it is true: we think that a breakfast consulisting of bread with hagelslag (Dutch chocolate sprinkles riddled with sugar), is a good breakfast when done in moderation, it makes the child happy, and it is lekker.

    Back in the Netherlands we never had these kind of discussions, although there was a huge variety here of course, there were more similarities. My wife and I value freedom, independence, creativity and happiness, like most parents I believe. When my son was 7 we allowed him to cycle on his own to school, like most childeren, without helmet of course, only foreigners wear hel ets when cycling over here. We had the agreement, still have, that he would always let us know what he was up to before going on the play date the childeren arranged by themselves.

    Our son is now 20, a well behaved, happy youngster. Funny thing: we find it well behaved if he disagrees with something or someones and speaks his mind and is willing to discuss this.

    He is not troublefree, he struggled with his ambitions and dreams and the perceived unfairness in our society and education system. He rebelled and dropped out of school. As a parent I of course wanted him to have his degree, but in all honesty, he was, and is right. Now he is working and decided he wants to go back to school. What he got from that is that he is now aware of his personal values and emotional needs, and that these might conflict with the rules and regulations of our institutions. This is all what I hoped for, all the rest will follow.

    As for resilience, he takes authorities with a huge grain of salt “you always have to use your common sense” he told my wife wrt the conflicting corona distancing rules. I’m slowly introducing him to anti-fragility. We opened a crypto account after we had a discussion about the money he wasted on needles stuff. It is not about crypto, but about accepting limited losses while opening the possibility to big gains, that is, having a rational approach to risks in life, and to formulate a balanced, “implement and forget” strategy. The amount of money involved? 50 euro, and a monthly 5 euro.

    What I learned from being a parent is that many of my primary responses  were, and to a lesser extend are, driven by fear. Fear of him needing to struggle later in life, fear of him hurting himself. He once told me that he understood, but that it was his life and his right to experience all that. I cannot agree more, but I find being a parent difficult because it is one big excercise of “letting loose”, but luckily my son raised me to become a better parent.

    A proud parent.

    • Wed, May 27, 2020 - 07:55am

      #4
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Posts: 171

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      Why this doc thinks the Lancet report is fake

    Very good point! If the decision is binary, part of a selection or not, using 23 factors would lead to more than 8 million possible partitions (2^23). When you only have 90 thousand samples, you run into problems really really fast. Typically machine learning algorithms are used for this type of analysis. I do not know what kind of method they used, nor am I interested. This fact in itself is sufficient to reject this research.

    • Mon, May 25, 2020 - 01:02pm

      #5
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      NPR Equates Hydroxychloroquine with Drinking Bleach

    Hi Bobinyelm,

    As there are no facts, only assertions, and political framing (Trump=bleach=stupid), this should just be considered as a contribution to the increase of entropy of the universe, like emptying a balloon, boiling some water or burning some coal.

    It’s so laughable that it almost makes me cry. As of now I will ignore all this kind of nonsense.

    Thanks for sharing btw!

    • Sat, May 23, 2020 - 05:52am

      #4
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Reply To: HCQ breakthrough: ICMR finds it’s effective in prevention of Covid 19

    Wow, “Do not bother. you are probably a waste of space anyway” , quite an agressive statement: me don’t like.

    • Fri, May 22, 2020 - 07:42am

      #223
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Hydroxychloroquine vs The Globalist Deep State

    Interesting study. The issue that I have with this: was the treating assignment random? Or, to put it differently: why did some people receive the treatment, and/or hospitalization? For example, in the Netherlands you get hospitalized if they expect that you are at a very high risk. Is that the same in all countries included in this research? And, could it be that in the very high risk cases, people would be given the medical treatment? Clearly not everone received the treatment.

    I’m interested in an additional time partitioning. For example, divide the groups in three timeframes. I expect that the timeframe behaves as an instrumental variable: early during the pandemic, there was panic, focus was on the most severe, later during the pandemic, knowledge grew, which might have impacted the treatment assignment. If there are significant differences per timeframe, it could be hypothized that the treatment assignment was not random, therefor introducing a bias in the endresult

    So, the mortality imo is inconclusive, a randomized test is needed. I do suspect that the increased risk wrt heart issues is real, but I wonder if the risk increase is dose dose dependent.

     

    • Tue, May 19, 2020 - 12:31am

      #2
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Good News: Moderna Announces Positive Phase 1 results its mRNA Vaccine

    Doom and Gloom,

    Hi tatagiri. I think you are mistaken on this. There is hardly any doom and gloom. What you will find is a mix of true concern, healthy scepticism, criticism, discussions, and compassion.

    Thanks for the link!

    • Mon, May 18, 2020 - 01:46am

      #4
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Reply To: Dr. Judy Mikovits & Mike Adams on Fauci fraud, NIH corruption and more

    Hi Keenan,

    Yes and no. Nuttiness is a kind of a “spectral” affliction. Imo one should avoid the extremes: zero-nutty people have the ability to bore someone to death, while totally nutty people need our compassion.

    Dr. Judy was a truly gifted scientist, truly gifted. Her nuttiness came into being, created or induced, later in life. I find it actually very tragic. What I noticed about non-extreme, higly intelligent people who got nutty later in life, is a mix of keen observations that lead to a deranged perception of reality. Nuttiness can be a powerful coping strategy to  make sense of a suddenly change in (perceived) reality from friendly to hostile.

    This is of course my personal observation and interpretation; I tend to listen to the non-extreme, nuts and do my due diligence. Partly out of consideration, partly out of curiosity.

    Of course, one is totally free to decide what information sources to allow in ones personal life. So yes, she is nutty, and no, there might be some aspects in her ramblings which are  not.

    I teresting is to cross-reference her story regarding Dr. Fauci wrt a patent:

    patents of Dr. Fauci:

    https://worldwide.espacenet.com/patent/search?called_by=epo.org&q=%22Fauci%20anthony%22

    patents Dr. Mikovits:

    https://worldwide.espacenet.com/patent/search?q=Judy%20Mikovits

    Take care!

     

    • Fri, May 15, 2020 - 08:41am

      #11
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      NIH HCQ/AZI Study: 6 months to study a 7-day treatment

    This post is only for careful, longtime, independent thinking pipinauts. It comes with many disclaimers, it contains some potential dangerous information for people without any self control:

    check out: “cinchona bark”.

    1. Check out side effects and interactions on for example webmd.com. There are interactions and contra indications.
    2. In high dose it may even be deadly (like anything else)
    3. Safe dose: maximal 1 gram per day, i.e., two to three cups of tea.
    4. half-life~ 11 to 18 hours

    considering all this, i think it cannot be used as a prophylactic.

    Ok, what is this about? It is a natural source for quinin. Relatively cheap. For example, I ordered 70 gram, should be enough for 140 daily doses because I will stay well within  the maximum dose per day: 0.5 grams to make tea.  I’ll test it carefully starting with half a cup, combined with zinc. If this does not make things worse, i will increase to 1 cup the next day.

    It is still prescribed against malaria, ususlly in combination with artemisinin.

    It is unknown how it works, but as chloroquine and HCQ are synthetic versions of it, it is assumed that the working principle is similar to chloroquine; it could be as strong a zinc ionophore (so much for science).

    Why am I going to try this? My GP does not want to prescribe HCQ because TPTB “say no”, and because I do not have the luxury to wait till dr Fauci and his gang can rake in their millions for what most probably will be the least tested vaccin ever forced upon us. I’m my own guinea 🐖: the supplement protocol mentioned here definitely helps, but I cannot shed this virus, the symptoms are still very mild, and I dare not to think about how it would have expired without these supplements. Btw, I do not have any comorbidities, just drew the short straw I guess.

    Yes, we are really on our own.

    I did not add any links as it is important for people to do their own research. Use your brains, inform yourself, and weigh the risks and benefits.
    Take care!

    • Thu, May 14, 2020 - 03:03am

      #7
      DaveDD

      DaveDD

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      Reply To: There are 3 viruses

    Hi Selfreplicatingbambi,

    Are you refering to this article? https://www.cambridge.org/engage/coe/article-details/5ead2b518d7bf7001951c5a5

    If so, it is still preprint. If not, where did you get your assertions from?

    Take care!

Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 61 total)