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    • Wed, Feb 11, 2009 - 07:58pm

      #12

      Downrange

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      Re: Join the Virginia Battalion of the Martenson Brigade

    Great thread!

     

    Near Blacksburg – GO HOKIES!

     

    DR

    • Wed, Feb 11, 2009 - 04:42pm

      #7

      Downrange

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      Re: Tales from the Crypt – personal anecdotes on the …

    Excellent comments here, thanks for sharing! I meant to reply earlier. I agree the Baby Boomers are a unique problem within a crisis. I mean, it is compounding the situation, as there are no “takers” for the assets they will need to unload as they retire and sail off into the sunset.
    More and more, I’m hearing people say that they have delayed their retirement plans, put it off, and I can only say that they may have to keep delaying them. If this continues down the present path, and there is no reason for it not to, traditional stock market-based investment plans are going to be worth about a quarter of their 2007 values. This represents the largest single loss of “wealth” ever experienced by any generation.

    In many ways, the older generation (my parents, for example) are perhaps the most blessed in all this. They are getting the benefit of top medical care, even in their last year of life, essentially provided “cost no object.” This clearly cannot continue. As resources recede away, assets devalue, inflation of currencies begins, corners will be cut. Entitlement programs are an obvious target.

    I hope that others will post some anecdotal experiences – that’s what the thread is for. Thanks guys.

    • Wed, Feb 11, 2009 - 04:25pm

      #32

      Downrange

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      Re: Statism Is Dead!!

    If we’re throwing book titles around, let me mention Ayn Rand’s "Atlas Shrugged."

    Many people miss the point of Rand’s writings, using the awful examples of "rand fan" Alan Greenspan, and others, to tarnish her pure and shining model.  Big capitalism (statist capitalism) is no better than big socialism; both sacrifice the individual to the state/megopoly. 

    Some mistake the "left-right" political model for a linear device.  It’s actually circular, and both polar extremes curve around and meet below in the middle.  A better paradigm is "individualist vs. collectivist."

    Fun to see cats and dogs in bed together over something like this!

    • Wed, Feb 11, 2009 - 03:44am

      #4

      Downrange

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      Re: Capitalism’s Self-inflicted Apocalypse

    Uh, I read Patrick "five-by."  What’s the problem?

    • Tue, Feb 10, 2009 - 07:59pm

      #12

      Downrange

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      Re: Statism Is Dead!!

    Very thought-provoking video.  Note the differences between how this country began (its Constitution that reserved most rights for the people and their states) and how it is ending.  It would seem human nature and venality dooms even the best ventures along the line of central government.

    • Tue, Feb 10, 2009 - 03:41pm

      #49

      Downrange

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      Re: The Definitive Firearms Thread

    OK, how ’bout this?

     

    Put them to work.  Think 1930s chain-gangs.  Prison farms.  License plates.

    In short, no more coddling criminals, turning our prisons into Crime U., complete with TV in the dorms and top notch athletic facilities…

    • Tue, Feb 10, 2009 - 01:37pm

      #52

      Downrange

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      Re: Can Permaculture and community really save us ?

    Interesting thread, thanks for posting it!

    I have just a couple of things to contribute here.  First, I think it is an error to believe a large number of people will voluntarily remove themselves from the planetary population.  Anyone who’s watched a friend or loved one slowly die from a degenerative disease or condition will recognize that the will to live is a strong one, and most people "die hard."  I think when survival becomes a daily competition over ever scarcer resources, a more likely scenario is that the have-nots will try to "suicide" the haves.

    Second, don’t underestimate the power of the state security politboro that’s been put into place, especially here in the U.S. since 2001.  As someone who works on the periphery of the DHS, I can say that their planning has been quite thorough-going, and that most of the scenarios people here can envision for how all this goes down have been played out, and contingency plans are already ready.  I don’t mean this in a "tin-foil" way; I simply mean that the following can reasonably be expected to result from the kinds of major breakdowns that would accompany a full SHTF scenario:

    – Essentially martial law, especially in cities, with movement tightly controlled, checkpoints, new forms of I.D. that are very hard to fake, limits on distances travelled, gasoline rationing, and attempted seizure of or at least strong restriction on the bearing of private arms (see New Orleans, Katrina).

    – State control of the means of agricultural production to some extent, including enforcing productivity/land acre requirements (that, if you, the owner, cannot fulfill them, the new "owner" will), forced repopulation of rural areas with "worker bees/volunteers" to replace the oil-based machinery, limits on consumption.

    – Forced redistribution of wealth – your 201K (used to be 401K, remember?) is not yours to do with as you wish, anymore.  Assets and holdings that are concentrated in the hands of upper middle class members may not be as secure as they imagined.  I expect the truly rich will prosper, as a centralized state security-based hierarchy is certainly not immune to being "bought off."

    I mention these things not because I’m sure they will all come, but just because I recognize the potential for them all.  Whenever you have a central government that has strayed as far as the U.S. has from its constitutional principles, all of which were placed there exactly to prevent the type of centrally-managed cleptocracy to evolve that has, in fact, evolved, you must be aware of the possibilities that are likely to occur.  And, as the U.S. has effectively "led" the world since WWII, I suspect we’ll see more of the same trends in other "developed" nations.

     

    • Sun, Feb 08, 2009 - 03:22pm

      #11

      Downrange

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      Re: Lessons Learned from a Power Outage

    Great story and thread!  Thanks for sharing.

    I bought a 5KW generator years ago, but still haven’t wired up a connection to the well pump here – something I need to do.  I also picked up a Honda 2KW inverter style generator, that is great for running computer and TV/Stereo and use very little fuel.  I think judicious use of gasoline powered generators could make things easier – run the biggie an hour or two a day for the water pump and heater (everyone gets showers then) and run the freezer once or twice a day to keep everything nice and frozen in there.  Run the little one as needed to fulfill communications and entertainment needs.  It’s not too hard to store even a month’s supply of gas for a year or so with Stabil, at those consumption rates.  I presently store around 60 gallons, Stabilized, and recycle with new fuel at the end of each summer.  Do exercise safe storage principles for gasoline (grounded metal tanks, no plastic containers, sparkless pumps, etc.).

    • Sun, Feb 08, 2009 - 03:05pm

      #4

      Downrange

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      Re: Climate Change, the Three E’s, and War

    Certainly can’t speak for Chris, but it might have something to do with the fact that the role of human CO2 release in the scheme of the planetary warming cycle has not been definitively established.  As such, AGW (anthropogenic global warming) is more of a religion, complete with articles of "faith," and, in my view, a basic Calvinist sense of self-denial, that doesn’t belong in a serious view of our predicament and what we might realistically do about it.  As another poster pointed out, the problem of excess carbon release is likely to be a short-lived one anyway, as we’ve high-graded out most of the carbon-based fuel supply anyway…

    In fact, if AGW had some basis in fact, it could prove to be delaying the arrival of the next ice age, which would be a true global catastrophy for the billions not living in equatorial zones.  So it could be a good thing, if it were real, kind of ironic, eh?

     

    • Thu, Feb 05, 2009 - 01:54pm

      #19

      Downrange

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      Re: Alternative Energy sources or technology: why are these …

    Great thread!  That shows what can be kicked off when someone asks a "right question."

    Just another data point:  if you’ve never explored the written works of Bucky Fuller, they may add value.  Bucky invented the geodesic dome, among many other things, but perhaps was best known to a generation of ex-hippie "seekers" as a techno-utopian who put an enormous amount of disparate pieces into a meaningful picture of the reality we face.  I don’t worship the man as perfect, and have problems with some of the conclusions he reached, but wholeheartedly recommend you read him and absorb what you can of his message.  A good place to start is "The Critical Path," for an analysis of where we are (were – written in eighties, iirc) and where we may be heading, and "Grunch of Giants," for a perspective on the "political" (read: power) angle on all this.

    No spoilers, and I don’t have time this morning to try to summarize, but he essentially said the problem is solvable with a design revolution that is THOROUGH-GOING and includes a shift in the entire culture away from the historic model of competition over scarce resources to one of cooperation over management of those remaining to us, enhanced and augmented through the application of "mind," for lack of a better word.  Best read it yourselves.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 31 total)