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    • Tue, Aug 21, 2018 - 08:15pm

      #4
      cgolias

      cgolias

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      Joined: May 13 2011

      Posts: 35

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      Vaclav Smil

    Hi Adam,

    Hope you’re well. I came across the work of Vaclav Smil recently and thought of the webinar you are planning. Have you or Chris ever contacted him to appear as a guest on a podcast or as part of a webinar? His work on civilizations’ energy use seems to be top-notch, but he is reportedly a bit of a recluse.

    Good luck planning,

    Chris

    https://www.amazon.com/Energy-Civilization-History-MIT-Press-ebook/dp/B072FH69YH

    https://www.businessinsider.com/bill-gates-favorite-books-vaclav-smil-2017-12#global-catastrophes-and-trends-the-next-50-years-2008-6

    • Tue, Oct 21, 2014 - 08:24pm

      #480
      cgolias

      cgolias

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      Mutation rate of Ebola2014 found to be higher than past strains

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-10-21/ebola-2014-mutating-fast-seasonal-flu

    • Tue, Jul 03, 2012 - 02:25am

      #10
      cgolias

      cgolias

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      Heat Tolerant Veggies

    I had great success with okra and squash in a very hot Philadelphia summer a few years back. Some of the other crops–especially the ones with andean or central american origins, like peppers, potatoes and tomatoes, have a harder time with the extreme heat. Ones from the mediterranean, like onions, or Indian subcontinent, like eggplant, or ones from Africa, like okra, melons, millett and sorghum, fare far better. Native americans had success with squash, corn, and various hard beans in the desert southwest, where temps are regularly over 100. Where I am in South America now is one of the hottest regions–and many of the same things are grown and do well (except there is no okra). I hate that I can’t have a garden this year bc of my travels, but at least I am learning some different ways to hedge against the vagaries of climate! Hope this helps.

    Chris

    • Mon, Jun 18, 2012 - 04:26pm

      #5
      cgolias

      cgolias

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      Some Parameters

    I tend to put alot of emphasis on growing things, especially organized in permaculture. With this in mind, I wouldn’t go anywhere colder than USDA zone 4b, or anywhere with super-irregular annual rainfall especially if the average is less than 30 inches. A place colder than 4b or drier than 30 inches per year both seem to be notable drop off points for what can be grown. Make no mistake, there are wonderful workarounds for both lack of moisture and cold, but they require more forethought and work.

    Political climate is something I am less able to weigh in on. . .  I have found Pennsylvania to be pretty good for me, as my personal ideology incorporates some aspects of so-called right and left. There aren’t too many regulations against greywater/natural building/homeschooling either. Not that these things are necessary, but its nice to be free to decide. Other states I have heard good things about in terms of personal agency are West Virginia and Idaho. Laws like these can change at the whim of local or state gov, so I don’t research them much though.

    The careers thing is a HUGE topic. What it comes down to is that anywhere there is a community there is a possibility for productive interfacing among residents. For other careers, a solid university or college in the area or town often helps, especially if the city is smaller. I feel like I can’t give a good answer bc there are some sectors in which only one city is an option (international development), where others can be found anywhere (healthcare).

    In any case, hope this helps.

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