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    • Tue, Oct 12, 2021 - 12:32am

      #7
      cellima

      cellima

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      FRONTSIGHT FIREARMS TRAINING NOVEMBER 2021

    I just received the email today too, I am very confused about what the course costs, it appears to be… nothing?

    I’m also wondering what I should expect to pay for ammo. Right now we only own a .22 and a shotgun. I have a ton of .22 ammo, I’m not sure I can do the class with a .22 though. lol. We’ve been wanting to buy a 9 mm anyway so this might be the extra motivation we needed, but my husband and I would both be doing it if we were going to go, and I’m not sure if we can afford to buy two 9 mm’s and all the ammo we’d need for both of us.

    I guess I’m trying to figure out if this is still in the real of possibility cost wise for us, lol. We’re both pretty young still, just exiting our 20’s, and while these are things I would like to invest in, I’m not sure if it is going to be foolish given our finances.

    • Wed, Sep 15, 2021 - 06:35pm

      #2
      cellima

      cellima

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      Reply To: Prosper Meet Up

    I’m not in Chicago, but since we’re talking meet ups I thought I’d add I’d be interested in meeting people too. We are in Northern CA (Nevada County) right now, transitioning to Idaho (Adam’s County) this fall. I’d especially love to make more Idaho connections as we’re going to be new.

     

     

     

     

    • Thu, Jul 29, 2021 - 04:28pm

      #18
      cellima

      cellima

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      MSM accidentally told the truth

    My mom noticed this one, she thought it was particularly damning when they mentioned that vaccinated people had the same viral load as unvaccinated, that information was removed later and she noticed and was very upset. I think it might be her waking up moment.

    • Wed, Jun 09, 2021 - 01:41am

      #17
      cellima

      cellima

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      Homeschooling – experiences and advice please

    Haha, so since that last post turned into more of an inspirational speech, I’ll offer more specific advice here. There are so many different ways to homeschool and so many different curriculum and philosophies. In my opinion, the best one is the one that works best for your family, your child, and your lifestyle. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different things and especially don’t be afraid to abandon a curriculum if you don’t like it or you just feel it isn’t really working for you. Remember to give value to time spent in play, outside, or creative endeavors, it’s not all about book work. Don’t feel like because traditional school lasts for seven hours you need to have your child engaged in seven hours of learning. First, most of that time is spent on procedures, very little is actually time your child is learning something. Second, almost everything we do can be turned into an engaging lesson, and free time spent in pursuit of interests is time well spent (unless it’s T.V or video games).  Most homeschoolers spent very little times on actually bookwork, even the organized ones rarely do more then an hour or two a day in the primary grades.

    Don’t neglect extra curricular activities. These are also great opportunities for more social interaction.

    Play off your strengths and interests, and your child’s strengths and interests.

    If you live in an area that has public homestudy charter school you may want to look into the programs they offer. These can be great for many families, but they vary so much by what they offer from state to state and school to school. Currently my kids are enrolled in a public homestudy charter school. We have a supervising teacher (who happens to still be my mom, … go figure) who is there to support families with ideas and resources, as well as oversee that the kids are actually doing something. This charter offers a huge yearly budget per child that can be spent on curriculum, tutors, lessons, art supplies, etc. In return we agree to go through with the state testing and provide samples to our Supervising teacher. For some families that is more oversight then they want and they would prefer to go it alone,  honestly I think ours is a little too traditional for me, and if my mother wasn’t our supervising teacher I might pull my kids out and homeschool independently, but the budget is very nice.

    Most homeschoolers do end up with gaps in their knowledge, they tend to be extremely good and several things, and not very good at one or two things, as opposed to most public school children, who, by comparison, tent to be well rounded and mediocre at everything (lol, okay, I am being a little to harsh here, but you get the idea. I don’t necessarily see this as a bad thing. Science was definitely neglected when I was growing up. I remember having very little science education, especially in the upper grades. but my reading comprehension is excellent, and apparently I can read and understand a scientific study significantly better then the majority of the world (as I have discovered this last year!). My husband, on the other hand, also had no formal science training, but was very interested in the sciences while a teenager and now has a much better understanding of them then most of his peers (and definitely better than me!) Give your child access to people who have different strengths then you.

    Definitely connect with other local homeschooling families, don’t be afraid to try out their suggestions, but also don’t feel like you have to do things their way, find your way!

    • Wed, Jun 09, 2021 - 01:03am

      #16
      cellima

      cellima

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      Homeschooling – experiences and advice please

    Hello Pappy! I was homeschooled growing up, am now a teacher, and am currently homeschooling my two children. Here are my experiences:

    My mother was a single parent, and finished her teaching credential when I was little. My whole life I went to whatever school she was teaching in, however, she had little interest in the public school system, so that meant I went to private schools (where my mom was the main teacher), or went to charter schools (where my mom was my supervising teacher) or was homeschooled and went to classes that my mother taught for other homeschoolers.

     

    I have never been to a traditional public school and I never had any desire to. I have had no regrets about not having a traditional school experience.

    For me, homeschooling allowed me to play, be a child, and be creative, homeschooling allowed me pursue what ever passions I had, learn new skills, travel, hold a job, and go to college early.

    When I was in High School for example, I would tell people that I was homeschooled, but I was never at home. I was going to a Homestudy charter school at the time (that my mother taught at). I started taking classes at the community college when I was 14, and finished most of my G.E. requirements this way, earning both college and high school credit for the classes I took. I also did a veterinary assistant occupational program and held and internship at a local vet clinic. I was also heavily involved in community theater, and was always auditioning and performing in plays. I took fencing classes and singing lessons, and I would take classes offered at my school two days a week. I was seriously never home by my Junior year, which ended up being my senior year because I had finished everything a year early. I was accepted straight into a University where I also graduated a year early, because I had already finished almost all my general education requirements.

    I got married when I was eighteen, and my husband, whom I had been doing heater with for years, and was also homeschooled, could not have had a ore different experience. He started highschool at the public school, and was bullied terribly, so his mother pulled him out and decided to homeschool him. She did everything independently, and by the second year she had pretty much given up and let him do whatever he wanted.

    Which, for him, just meant music, theater, reading, and blowing stuff up sort of science experiments.

    He didn’t have a high school diploma, and was to honest to lie and tell people he did, or even say that he was homeschooled but graduated. This was a serious impairment during our first few years as a couple, as he was pretty much unhirable. I had finished my master’s degree in education by the time I was twenty, we had a one year old baby, and he was still struggling to find a job. I made him start taking community college classes, and eventually I found a charter school that help former drop outs finish their diplomas. He went through the program when he was 25 and finished it in a couple months. It didn’t really teach him anything new, but it did wonders for his self esteem.

    I like to tell people my story because one of the greatest concerns about newly homeschooling parents is: what will their future be like? How will they obtain social interaction? How will they go to college? etc. I like to tell my husbands story as a cautionary tale.

    Schooling a child required parental involvement.

    When going through my teacher education program I was always struck by one of the biggest indicators of a students success had nothing to do with socioeconomic status, but was rather the level of involvement the parent took in the child’s education. This is true regardless of the education level of the parent.

    If you are going to homeschool your child, and you throw a text book in front of them and say “do this” and walk out of the room, your child probably isn’t going to be that successful. By the same virtue, if you sent you kid to public school, and never talk to them about school, or help them with their homework and projects, and never read to them at night, and expect the teacher to be completely and totally in charge of educating your child, your child probably isn’t going to be very successful.

    It is my philosophy that many children do so poorly in the public school system because we, as a society, have decided that education is the teachers business, it is not! It is always your responsibility to be actively engaged in your child’s education, and homeschooling allows so many  to just take that to the next level.

    I think that has been one of the many blessings about this whole pandemic, is the number of families it has brought together, and the the number of people who have realized that, yes, they can school their own children!

    There is no “right” way to homeschool, and there are very few wrong ones. Parents have been passing on the skills they need in live since the dawn of time, and in the current age of information, there is access to an abundance of knowledge for anyone who cares to access it. Therefore the key is caring. You are taking the first step be caring enough about you child’s future and the desire to involve yourself in their education. If you follow that with action…

    You will both do wonderfully.

    • Wed, Jun 03, 2020 - 04:21pm

      #26
      cellima

      cellima

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      Calling All PP Parents — Your Input Needed!

    I have a five and an eight year old. I am definitely a more relaxed parent and give the kids a lot of freedom, to a point. We live in a rural area and they have been  allowed to run around and play outside without supervision since the age of four or so. They know their limits for the most part, and don’t push themselves to do something that is beyond their  capabilities.

    They are allowed to roam the property and ride their bikes down the street without asking. If they want to go further (five minute hike to the creek, for example) they need to ask and I usually like them to bring the dog with them, especially if it is near dawn or dusk (bears).

    Most of our friends have similar approaches to parenting, although I am often the loosest as far as what supervision I require of them. They haven’t done many sleepovers and things yet but I would absolutely require meeting and spending time with both parents before letting them go alone to someone else’s house. Again, I am more fearful or other people then the possibility that they will come to some harm of their own devices.

    I would be more concerned about my laid back approach if we lived in a city or had nosy neighbors scrutinizing them. I have more fear for “well meaning” strangers then I do of them actually getting themselves in trouble.

    We don’t have TV, but watch movies more often then I’d like. Video games are a big no (they didn’t really even know what those were until this last year) and I have no intention of ever getting either of them a cell phone. The are just starting to use the computer to look things up, write stories, and draw pictures. I think they use technology too much and see a clear decline in their behavior and creativity when I am lenient with the movies.

    Really the only part my husband and I clash is in regards to cleanliness. I am a slob and see no issues with the kids getting dirty, he’s a virgo who was raised by an OCD neat freak,  messes are hard on him. It’s funny, because he definitely agree’s with the concept that getting down and dirty is one of the best ways to build up a young immune system, but in practice he has a hard time with it.

    My husband also has a hard time not correcting them when he sees them doing something wrong or inefficiently, whereas I prefer to just let them figure it out themselves trough experimentation (unless they ask, in which case I’d be happy to offer advice.)

     

    Hope that helps!

    • Tue, May 19, 2020 - 08:18pm

      #6
      cellima

      cellima

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      Good News: Moderna Announces Positive Phase 1 results its mRNA Vaccine

    I find it very curious that the trial indicates that all females of childbearing age must practice abstinence (or an acceptable birth control method) for the duration of the study and are also screened for pregnancy before each injection. Is that normal in a Phase 1 clinical trial?

    It seems like it would definitely be a good idea to monitor pregnant woman more closely,  but this is a vaccine that would, presumable, be given during pregnancy later, correct? Seems like it would be good to start collecting that data now… although it would have been better to do it with animal trials… I don’t really understand how any of this is ethical without them… but it takes time to determine whether something in safe for use during pregnancy and has any effects on the fetus.

Viewing 7 posts - 11 through 17 (of 17 total)