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    • Fri, Oct 19, 2018 - 02:07am   (Reply to #3047)

      #3048

      Aaron M

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      Suggestions

    Hi DumDum2, 

    I think you’ll enjoy the M&P. I’ve tried several times to convince myself that I should go back to the Glock becuase it’s just… everywhere… but I don’t enjoy shooting it as much, and it doesn’t carry as nicely. 

    As to holsters, OWB is a bit out of my main channel, but what are you looking for? Retention? No retention? Duty type holster? Concnealed carry? 

    For my money, I’ve had good experiences with Raven Concealment, Safariland, and Dale Fricke’s holsters. That said, I’ve been carrying “vasectomy carry” for about 9 years now, so most of my recomendations would be for AIWB arrangements. 

    That’s a rabbit hole, but I certainly understand someone not being comfortable with that method of carry. 

    Also, a final bit of advice: If you don’t already have one, get a good carry belt. A good belt (and conversely, a bad one) will make a major difference in the comfort of your carry arrangement. You’ll need to match your holster to the belt width, with the most common being 1.5″ for non-duty carry.

    Cheers!
    Aaron

    • Sat, Oct 06, 2018 - 05:04pm

      #30

      Aaron M

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      Training

    Great job taking that “first step”!

    Front Sight was the first professional, non-military shooting curriculum I ever attended, which woke me up to the need to do more skill building under guidance.

    As you all move forward, learning to use the basics built there will serve you well, but there’s quite a bit of hyperbole tied up in FS’s presentations. 

    Their promise of being better than 95% of people who carry a gun for a living, for example. This promise lacks context, and isn’t relevant. It gives you some items from the “do” list, but none of the perspectives from the “don’t” list.

    Marksmanship is probably 10% of the bigger picture, with the vast majority being intellectual (awareness, tactics, interpersonal communication skills – roughly 50%), with another 25% being bodily kinesthetic (physical fitness, physiological familiarity with the weapon). The remaining 15% is mental calm and nerve, which has to be reinforced through more advanced training, such as force on force or martial arts. Violence is the ultimate competitive sport, and as such, mindset and strength of will is important. This can’t be learned on the range.

    Further, courses like this simply cannot introduce concepts to the students that force them into realistic decision trees. For example, what happens if shooting starts while you’re holding a child? What if you’re injured? What happens if you challenge a perp and they comply? Can you work your handgun while operating a disparate task with your support side hand?

    How we understand violence is important, too. What’s applicable for a Navy SEAL probably isn’t relevant to an armed citizen, and often as not, their experiences with violence will be totally different.

    The ultimate message here is that guns are about life and death. Similar to medicine, if you take up the art, you may quit, but you’ll never finish. 

    This curriculum is the “pre-reqs”. You have some habits now that if maintained will help facilitate greater skill building. The next step is learning to use them in context. I’m always available if anyone would like to discuss this more in depth.

    I fully expect no one wants to hear this right now, but I promise… you’ll circle back to it if you stick with self defense training. 

    Cheers,

    Aaron

    [email protected]

     

    • Sun, Sep 16, 2018 - 02:40am

      #3046

      Aaron M

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      Joined: Oct 22 2008

      Posts: 790

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      Preferences

    To Begin: Thank you, Chris! I’m glad you enjoy it. Hopefully, it’s a small return on the effort you’ve put in here. I’ve certainly learned a lot from you. 

    On guns more generally,

    Over the last few years I’ve been testing a few different platforms, and should probably confess, I’ve been carrying a Smith and Wesson M&P for the last 6 years. I have the utmost confidence in the Glock and it’s still my ‘general’ recommendation, but these days there are quite a few good quality, striker-fired handguns out there. The H&K VP9, the M&P lineup, Sig, and a few others are making pistols to the same standard as Glock. Admittedly without the lengthy pedigree, but they’re good choices. 

    As to rifles, I’ve established a healthy respect for the “bad guy’s” gun: The AK platform. The rifle’s versatility, simplicity, reliability, and mix of firepower and barrier penetration is probably far closer in line with what most people need than they would like to believe. I’ve consistently been able to hit man sized targets out to 300 yards and had boringly consistent results in the 100-200 range. Especially for the Urban Environment, it’s not quite the underdog it once was.

    My EDC has changed a bit as well. There’s been a huge push among those who train seriously to start carrying some medical gear and I’m one of them. A couple methods of bleeding control are every bit as important as a pistol, and more likely to be used. Some of the other stuff is a bit more esoteric, but If you’re interested in reading, I’ve really refined the “lines of equipment” I used to talk about here, as well as the template for Understanding Emergencies

    The framework for these things, I think, would really appeal to the thoughtful PeakProsperity crowd. Essentially, we’ve defined three types of emergencies:

    1. Immediate, short duration, high intensity Emergency. Direct threat to life and limb.
    2. Moderate duration, moderate intensity Emergency which generally interrupts access to critical resources, and increases the likelihood of being caught in a Type I, and;
    3. A protracted, low intensity emergency that fundementally changes life for an indefinite period of time. 

    We integrate our equipment in such a way that the Type I is met with our “EDC” – the things we have on us and can access immediately.

    The Type II is met with an approach of “Sustainment“; we’ve made the case that the idea of ‘bugging out’ is kinda silly. What we want is equipment that sustains our ability to perform deliberate actions. That means equipment to stave off the threat in the “rule of 3’s” (Air, Shelter, Water, Food, Security) without panic. My personal choice is still a backpack, because you can wear it down the street, or out camping. Most of the training you could ever need could be had doing things that are actually pretty fun, like camping and hiking (which also have fitness benefits).

    The Type III requires community, family, resourcefulness, and stopgap measures. Essentially, it’s where diverse and elaborate skill sets become mandatory. 

    Anyway, this is long and link filled, but it should catch up anyone who’s interested in some of the conclusions I’ve learned in the last few years. 

    I’m always happy to come back and talk with you all here! PeakProsperity is a uniquely great spot of the internet.

    Cheers,
    Aaron

    • Fri, Sep 14, 2018 - 02:25am

      #3041

      Aaron M

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      Joined: Oct 22 2008

      Posts: 790

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      Thank you!

    DumDum2,

    Thank you for chiming in! I’m indeed still here, and very much appreciate the feedback. I figured this thread was pretty well put to bed so I haven’t updated it, but I’m glad to see it’s still having a positive effect all these years later.

    If you’re interested, most of my efforts on this topic can be found at:

    http://www.integratedskillsgroup.com

    Our work is heavily influenced by Chris and the 3E’s, but the ephasis is more about becoming as well rounded and skilled as is possible. 

    If there is renewed interest here, I’m happy to work with the Peak Prosperity crew to cross pollinate a bit!

    Thank you again,

    Aaron

    • Wed, Aug 15, 2018 - 01:06pm

      #17

      Aaron M

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      “Don’t complain, it doesn’t

    “Don’t complain, it doesn’t do any good and nobody likes it.”

    Somewhat self-explanatory, but once you put complaint aside, you can apply your wit to solutions. I learned this from a friend and mentor when I was in my early 20’s and it changed the way I think.

    “Timing, Tact, and Dosage.”

    In dealing with people, you have to be certain they’re of a mind and disposition to hear the message, deliver it in such a way that it’ll be gracefully received, and without laying it on too think (or thin). A guidance counselor gave me this advice before kicking me out of school, and it stuck with me from that point on.

    “Fail fast.”

    We all fail. Most of life is bumping into the walls a bit trying to figure out which way to go. The more quickly you can assess the points of failure, the faster you can find solutions and develop knowledge that’s based on experience. Don’t dwell on failures, find them quick, and learn from them without losing extra time.

    These are some of my favorites. Great idea for a thread, Adam.

    Cheers,

    Aaron

    • Thu, Jul 09, 2015 - 08:59pm

      #43

      Aaron M

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      No disagreement

    T2H,

    I don't disagree. It will likely take faaaar longer to occur than we think, so I plan on living within this rotten framework as long as is necessary. But generally I don't see any reason to think this experiment will last more than a few more lifetimes.

    Aaron

    • Thu, Jul 09, 2015 - 07:07pm

      #41

      Aaron M

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      So…

    So should we all max out our credit cards and just refuse to pay because it's likely the system will crash? 

    Is it reasonable to believe that those in power will be willing to sacrifice the "debt" owed to them? 

    I don't think it's at all reasonable to assume that this is unprecedented. While I acknowledge it was different, the Soviet Union collapsed as well. They had far flung impacts, but the nations that suffered the worst were their puppet governments. The U.S. Still has infrastructure and plenty of interests who will want to see it rebound quickly. I just don't buy the "free for all" worst case predictions.

    Aaron

    • Thu, Jul 09, 2015 - 04:39pm

      #39

      Aaron M

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      Ranger1 wrote:Are you

    [quote=Ranger1]

    Are you insane?  NOBODY is going to pay you when things go south.  Banks won't be able to collect on mortgages.  Business will be out of business.  THERE IS NO WAY that businesses of any kind will be able to collect on debt and THEY will be the first to know that fact.  They will close their doors and move far far away and you will never hear from them again. 

     

    [/quote]

    With all due respect, what your saying has never happened. There's no reason (at all) to believe that debts and debtors will just disappear. I don't disagree with your priorities, because they address emergencies pretty laterally, but you're approaching this as if you know what's going to happen. You don't. None of us do.

    Cheers,
    Aaron

    • Sun, Apr 19, 2015 - 10:26pm

      #4

      Aaron M

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      Thumbs up

    Chris, 

    As you know, you're preaching to the choir, here. I read this piece, which I needed to include in a project for school, and just shook my head in disbelief. The language here is 'fuzzy', to say the least, and I imagine this is how society keeps convincing itself that its addiction is totally justifiable and not really hurting anything.

    It's maddening, as I'm sure you know, to present this material to people who think that "peakers" are zealots who detach from society with a religious conformity to the notion that society cannot be sustained. 
    Yes, that's what they actually said, in this particular class. *sigh*

    Aaron

    • Mon, Mar 23, 2015 - 10:26pm

      #13

      Aaron M

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      JGritter

    Hi John, 

    As to the Islamic State, I don't believe they will turn North America into an Islamic state. The historical context I was referring to was the initial spread of Islam, which took a region that was complicated, multicultural and diverse in it's belief systems, and through overwhelming force, spread like wildfire. A big part of that success was "Convert or Die". 

    The most important takeaway was the "Convert or Die" mentality. It is, unsurprisingly, effective. It could be any ethos that adopts this MO, if things get bad enough, and I could see a violent Christian revival in certain regions. In general, religion makes me very cautious.

    So as to where we disagree, I think that the main fulcrum is getting to that Apex, and your choices once that happens. If an organized, systematic apex predator created system of destruction and pillaging without being routed by a good defense, chances are, there are still things you could do to avoid being caught up with those dangerous people. 

    The other disagreement was Urban vs Rural. I may have misread your intentions in the initial post, but it sounded like you thought you'd have no choice but to fall in with whatever evil sort of character came to power (or at least toe the line) and that rural survival would be bleak. 

    While both are certainly possible, it'd be difficult to substantiate those being your only options (if that's what you meant) so really, I mean to say "stay positive". Forces of Good are at work as well, and will continue to be, even if they're reduced by circumstance. 

    Cheers, and sorry if I misunderstood you,
    Aaron

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 675 total)