financial assets

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How To Defend Against An Unfair Re-Set Of The System

Hint: think like the 1%
Friday, September 29, 2017, 7:03 PM

Executive Summary

  • The source of leverage being used to manipulate us
  • The powers that be have a much weaker hand than we realize
  • The increase use of force to control the system will ultimately undermine it
  • What options are available to those who want to free themselves from this supression?

If you have not yet read Part 1: Upon The Next Crisis, The Rules Will Suddenly Change available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

In Part 1 we surveyed the dynamics driving ever-expanding state control, the state’s priorities in crisis management (secure the state’s authority and the wealth/power of elites) and the authorities’ current preference for indirect control of the market.

Leverage and the Market as a Signifier

Markets are no longer markets—they are simulacra of markets, displaying the superficial appearance but not the dynamics and uncertainties of real markets, which have an unnerving tendency to veer away from the state-approved scripts of permanent, stable expansion.

Why have central banks and states (which includes blocs of nations such as the Eurozone with a centralized governing elite) chosen to cloak their control of markets?

The answer is has two parts:  1) central banks/states must leverage their intervention due to the monumental scale of global markets; owning assets worth hundreds of trillions of dollars is at best awkward in the current arrangement and at worst politically impossible.  

While financial leverage is a relatively straightforward tool, 2) the real leverage is exerting psychological control over the market by transforming market price action into a signifier (i.e. signaling mechanism) that persuades participants to... » Read more

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Our nation has a historic, never-before-seen level of debt and a historic failure to save. Along with debt and savings, one also has to consider assets. After all, does it really matter if you have no savings and a million dollars of debt, if you have assets worth 10 million?

An asset is an item of ownership that is convertible into cash. Assets comprise the total resources of a person or business, including such things as cash, notes, accounts receivable, securities, inventories, goodwill, fixtures, machinery, and/or real estate.

Debts are fixed, while assets are variable. When you take on a debt, there it placidly sits, growing larger until you make payments on it. Assets, on the other hand, are variable, sometimes gaining and sometimes losing value.