interest rates



Steen Jakobsen: Now Is The Time To Be In Capital-Preservation Mode

Saxo Bank's CIO predicts a 15%+ market correction soon
Monday, March 19, 2018, 1:12 PM

Steen Jakobsen, Chief Investment Officer and Chief Economist of Saxo Bank, is sounding a clear warning of an arriving market correction.

Over-inflated asset prices, over-crowded trades, anemic market liquidity, and a continued decline in the credit impulse set the table for a banquet of consequences, in Steen's view.

Confident a market correction of at least 15% lies ahead, Jakobsen urges investors to exit leveraged positions and build cash. As for a longer view, he predicts commodities will be one of the best asset classes to own over the next five to ten years. » Read more


Off The Cuff: The Bond Market Will Have A Rude Awakening Soon

Higher interest rates will unleash a world of trouble
Thursday, February 22, 2018, 8:54 PM

In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Wolf Richter discuss:

  • The Coming Rude Awakening For Bonds
    • Spiking yields are about to crash prices
  • Multi-TrillIon Dollar Deficits
    • The US is spending much more than it admits to
  • Kryptonite For The Housing Market
    • Higher interest rates & unfavorable tax code changes
  • Pension Woes
    • Most pension plans will soon be in a world of pain

Chris and Wolf marvel at the bond market's apparent indifference so far to rising rates. Rising rates, of course, mathematically mean bond prices should lower -- but that hasn't happened much yet. With the 10-year Treasury nearly at 3% now, that resistance can't last for long. Especially if the Fed proceeds with its declared program of quantitative tightening this year.

Wolf explains the ticking time bond in the bond market thusly...

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Danielle DiMartino Booth: Don't Count On The Powell Fed To Rescue The Markets

The new Fed Chair may break from his predecessors
Sunday, February 11, 2018, 4:29 PM

The recent gut-wrenching drop in asset prices began on the first day of the job for new Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell.

How is Mr. Powell likely to react to a suddenly sick-looking market? Will he step in forcefully to reassure investors that there's a "Powell put" in place as a backstop?

To address these questions, former analyst at the Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, Danielle DiMartino Booth, returns to the podcast this week. In her opinion, having studied Powell's previous statements, she thinks those expecting him to continue the market support his predecessors provided will likely be quite disappointed.

Powell appears to be no large fan of continued quantitative easing, and has long been on the record as concerned about the eventual pain its unwind will cause. He very well may resist riding to the market's rescue at this time, allowing natural market forces to finally have their way: » Read more



Red Screen At Morning, Investor Take Warning

It's time for safety. And it's beginning to pay better, too
Friday, February 9, 2018, 9:12 PM

Growing up as I did in coastal New England, this old rhyme was drilled into us as children:

Red sky at night, sailor's delight;

Red sky at morning, sailor take warning.

I'm reminded of this rhyme because the markets are giving us a clear "red sky" warning right now. One that comes after (too) many years of uninterrupted fair winds and smooth sailing.



Is This It?

Has the next Great Financial Crisis just started?
Friday, February 2, 2018, 9:58 PM

Executive Summary

  • The significance of the recent spike in interest rates
  • Is the US dollar weakness a sign of other countries walking away from the US?
  • Are rising oil prices serving to pop the market bubble (as predicted)? Where are they headed from here?
  • Is this it? Is the top in? And if so, what should concerned investors do right now?

If you have not yet read Part 1: The Central Bank’s Reign of Error, available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

Is this it then?  Is the top in?  The last few days have been extremely turbulent in the markets with the Dow Jones declining nearly 1,000 points in just this week.

Given the smoke swirling around the global rise in interest rates, I’m certain there’s something afoot.  The real question is whether or not the central banks are going to step in here to rescue everything again.

Alas, I don’t have access to that information but a betting person would say “yes.”  Everything they’ve done over the past 10 years has communicated quite clearly that the central banks are terrified of the Franken-Markets they’ve created.  Specifically, they are terrified of them going down and revealing the extent of the fraud.

However, we have to remain alert to the idea that the markets are indeed larger than the central banks, at least when they begin to move in earnest, and that the central banks have not been able to alter the laws of reality.  Resources matter.  Debt levels matter.  Leverage matters.  Well, eventually they do, and maybe that time has come?

If so, we all need to be ready for a very rocky ride ahead because... » Read more



It's Looking A Lot Like 2008 Now...

Did today's market plunge mark the start of the next crash?
Friday, February 2, 2018, 9:57 PM

Economic and market conditions are eerily like they were in late 2007/early 2008.

Remember back then? Everything was going great. Home prices were soaring. Jobs were plentiful.

The great cultural marketing machine was busy proclaiming that a new era of permanent prosperity had dawned, thanks to the steady leadership of Alan Greenspan and later Ben Bernanke. And only a small cadre of cranks, like me, was singing a different tune; warning instead that a painful reckoning in our financial system was approaching fast.

It's fitting that I'm writing this on Groundhog Day, as to these veteran eyes, it sure has been looking a lot like late 2007/early 2008 lately... » Read more


The Inescapable Reason Why the Financial System Will Fail

Credit cannot expand faster than fundamentals forever
Friday, December 29, 2017, 8:13 PM

Central banks are now trapped.

If they raise rates to provide low-risk, high-yield returns to institutional owners, they will stifle the “recovery” and the asset bubbles that are dependent on unlimited liquidity and super-low interest rates. But if they keep yields low, the only way institutional investors can earn the gains they need to survive is to pile into risk assets and hope the current bubbles will loft higher.

This conundrum has pushed the central banks into yet another policy extreme: to mask the rising systemic risk created by asset bubbles, central banks have taken to suppressing measures of volatility—measures than in previous eras would reflect the rising risks of extreme asset bubbles deflating.

Creativa Images/Shutterstock

Off The Cuff: A World Of Rising Interest Rates

Means a future of falling prices -- in nearly everything
Friday, December 29, 2017, 4:55 PM

In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Charles Hugh Smith discuss:

  • The Crashing Treasury Curve
    • Interest rates are on the move
  • Get Ready For Interest Rates To Start Rising
    • The end of a 30-year downtrend
  • When Rates Rise, Prices Will Fall
    • Bonds, stocks, housing --- nearly everything
  • What's Next For Bitcoin?
    • We're witnessing a historical moment

Charles and Chris discuss the implications to anticipate should interest rates indeed start rising. The quick summary? It will change everything...

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Off The Cuff: Are We About To See Taper Tantrum 2.0?

The Fed wants to tighten. Will markets stand for it?
Thursday, December 14, 2017, 1:16 AM

In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Axel Merk discuss:

  • Taper Tantrum 2.0?
    • The Fed wants to tighten. But can it?
  • Bad Balance Sheets
    • Can central banks simply hold their bad assets forever?
  • The Flattening Yield Curve
    • A classic signal of approaching recession
  • Bitcoin
    • Trying to make sense of the recent run-up

Recorded before today's FMOC announcement, Chris and Axel discuss the next moves of the central banks, who's intervention and collusion have driven markets more than any other factor over the past decade. Most people don't realize that monthly liquidity injections are currentlyat their highest ever since QE began.

Now that the Fed is talking seriously about tightening -- can it? Or will the markets revert to throwing a tantrum as the global liquidity spigots begin to reduce their flow?

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Doug Noland: There Will Be No Way Out When This Market Bubble Bursts

Financial assets will become toxic to hold
Monday, December 11, 2017, 3:07 PM

This week Doug Noland joins the podcast to discuss what he refers to as the "granddaddy of all bubbles".

He certainly shares our views that prices in nearly every financial asset class have become remarkably distorted due to central bank intervention, first with Greenspan's actions to backstop the markets in the late-1980's, and more recently (and more egregiously) with the combined central banking cartel's massive and sustained liquidity injections in the years following the Great Financial Crisis.

All of which has blown the biggest inter-connected set of asset price bubbles the world has ever seen. Noland foresees tremendous losses as inevitable, as the central banks lose control of the monstrosity they have created: » Read more