Tag Archives: wealth

  • Insider
    TripAdvisor

    What High Net Worth Investors Are Thinking

    Notes from our latest wealth conference trip
    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, December 9, 2016, 3:37 AM

    16

    Here’s an update from the front lines.  Thanks to your continued support, Adam and I are able to carry the Peak Prosperity message out to an ever-increasing audience of both size and influence.

    One of the recent trends has been to present at wealth conferences, where an assortment of big money managers converge to share ideas, shake hands with old friends and meet new people.

    I’m just leaving the Opal Wealth Conference recently held at Laguna Beach CA. Here's what I learned.

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  • Podcast

    David Stockman: America Now Lives Under A ‘Perverted Regime’

    One foisted on the nation by its bipartisan ruling elites
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, October 2, 2016, 5:19 PM

    87

    David Stockman, former director of the OMB under President Reagan, former US Representative, and veteran financier is an insider's insider. Few people understand the ways in which both Washington DC and Wall Street work and intersect better than he does.

    In his upcoming book, Trumped! A Nation on the Brink of Ruin…And How to Bring it Back, Stockman lays out how we have devolved from a free market economy into a managed one that operates for the benefit of a privileged few. And when trouble arises, these few are bailed out at the expense of the public good.

    Stockman brings us his report of what 30 years of politics, degenerative crony capitalism and “bubble finance” have finally wrought. The upheaval and crossroads represented by Donald Trump’s candidacy spell economic disaster or resurgence, depending on the steps America chooses to take from here.

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  • Blog
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    Hell To Pay

    The final condition for a market crash is falling into place
    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, September 23, 2016, 9:23 PM

    37

    Those familiar with my writing know I put the word “markets” in quotes because we no longer have a financial system where legitimate price discovery is a regular — or even recognizable — feature.

    It's destined to fail. What more can be said about such a flawed system?

    Well, a lot as it turns out. 

    And failure to pay attention at this stage of economic and ecological history will prove to be exceptionally painful.

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  • Blog

    The Importance Of Perseverance

    Without training to overcome adversity, wealth is soon lost
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, September 16, 2016, 1:16 PM

    8

    There are literally thousands and thousands of books that have been written on how to amass wealth. Some excellent, some less so; and too many not worth the paper they're printed on. Each posits its own special strategy, promising a future of riches to the reader. Of course, were there a sure-fire recipe for making millions, it's a safe bet that the last thing the guy who figured it out would do is share it with the world.

    But as mentioned, some of these books have real value. One whose lessons have stuck with me in the decades since I first read it is The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America's Wealthy, first published in 1996 by two PhD researchers, Thomas Stanley and William Danko,

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  • What Should I Do?
    Shutterstock: Madlen

    How Soil Health Impacts All Wealth

    A focus on the importance of healthy soils
    by harnsoper

    Tuesday, November 24, 2015, 2:13 AM

    0

    In today’s complex economy how do we progress financially from where we are today and the life of abundance we seek? This is the first question a financial advisor will ask us. It is seldom an easy question to answer because the quality of our life isn’t measured purely in financial terms. There are multiple factors including our work, our family and, fundamentally, our values. How does our quest for financial wealth balance with the people and planet upon whom we depend? Surprisingly, it all begins with soil.

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  • Podcast

    Charles Eisenstein: What Is Wealth?

    It's about so much more than just money
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, September 28, 2015, 3:54 PM

    16

    Recently, author and "de-growth activist" Charles Eisenstein stopped by the Martenson homestead while traveling on business. Taking advantage of the opportunity, Chris sat him down to record an impromptu discussion on the nature of wealth.

    As should come as little surprise to Peak Prosperity readers, financial wealth ("money") is just one component — and given society's current over-fixation with it, its pursuit oftentimes limits our ability to be truly wealthy.

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  • Insider
    petrmalinak/Shutterstock

    Why China Is Extremely Vulnerable Now

    The majority of household wealth is at risk of vaporizing
    by charleshughsmith

    Friday, August 7, 2015, 4:36 PM

    8

    Executive Summary

    • Too much of China's wealth is tied up in housing
    • The Obvious Risk: Declines in demand will crush prices
    • The Less Obvious Risk: housing in China is very illiquid
    • China's extraordinary vulnerability

    If you have not yet read Part 1: Is China’s “Black Box” Economy About to Come Apart? available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

    In Part 1, we looked at the factors that render China’s economy a black box: the inputs and outputs are visible, but the internal workings are often opaque. Though there is an abundance of data on China’s housing market, it too is opaque in critical ways.

    Let’s dig into what makes China’s housing bubble so risky.

    Chinese Household Wealth Is Mostly In Housing

    The percentage of household assets in real estate varies from source to source, but however it’s sliced, China’s household wealth is extraordinarily concentrated in housing.

    This means any reduction in housing values will have an outsized impact on household wealth and the perception of wealth, i.e. the wealth effect: people who own assets that are rising feel wealthier and tend to spend more freely as a result. Those with assets that are declining in value tend to feel poorer, even if their day-to-day life in unaffected by the drop in wealth. This is the negative wealth effect.

     

    While middle-class households’ wealth is in their primary residence, upper-middle class households tend to put the family wealth in additional homes as investment properties. Anecdotally, it is not uncommon for middle-aged people with secure employment to own three flats: one for their residence and two as nest eggs. The practice of buying third homes was subject to restrictions a few years ago, but the resulting drop in housing demand scared authorities into…

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  • Blog
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    The Self-Employed Middle Class Hardly Exists Anymore

    Why owning your own income is more important than ever now
    by charleshughsmith

    Saturday, May 16, 2015, 8:57 AM

    11

    Of course, the easiest path to financial independence is being born into a wealthy, well-connected family.

    But since few of us win that born-rich lottery, this article addresses the important question: How do “the rest of us” carve out financial independence?

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  • Insider
    Kevin Grant/Shutterstock

    The Fed Is Destroying the World One Saver At A Time

    Bernanke's new blog offers bloviating proof of that
    by Chris Martenson

    Tuesday, April 7, 2015, 4:25 AM

    27

    I must confess to a deep-seated anger at just how insultingly stupid the world has become. As a sufferer of crisis fatigue I can be caught exclaiming You have got to be kidding me!!? several times per day, or perhaps shouting How dumb do they think we are?

    Three choice outbursts came last week as I read Bernanke’s new blog and came across statements like this one:

     

     

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  • Insider
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    The Consequences Playbook

    What will happen as central banks lose control
    by Chris Martenson

    Thursday, January 22, 2015, 3:45 AM

    15

    Executive Summary

    • Desperate central banks are dangerous central banks
    • Why wealth disparity will get worse
    • The list of what comes next as central banks lose control
    • What you should do in advance

    If you have not yet read When This Ends, Everybody Gets Hurt available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

    What’s really happened since 2008 is that central banks decided that a little more printing with the possibility of future pain was preferable to immediate pain.  Behavioral economics tells us that this is exactly the decision we should always expect from humans. History says as much, too.

    It’s just how people are wired. We’ll almost always take immediate gratification over deferred, and similarly choose to defer consequences into the future, especially if there’s even a ridiculously slight chance they won’t materialize.

    So instead of noting back in 2008 that it was unwise to have been borrowing at twice the rate of our income growth for the past several decades — which would have required a lot of very painful belt-tightening — the decision was made to ‘repair the credit markets’ which is code speak for: ‘keep doing the same thing that got us in trouble in the first place.’

    Also known as the ‘kick the can down the road’ strategy, the hoped-for saving grace was always a rapid resumption of organic economic growth. That’s how the central bankers rationalized their actions. They said that saving the banks and markets today was imperative, and that eventually growth would return, justifying all of the new debt layered on to paper-over the current problems.

    Of course, they never explained what would happen if that growth did not return. And that’s because the whole plan falls apart without really robust growth to pay for it all.

    And by ‘fall apart’ I mean utter wreckage of the bond and equity markets, along with massive institutional and sovereign defaults. That was always the risk, and now we’re at the point where…

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