Investing in precious metals 101

Tag Archives: transportation

  • Podcast

    Alice Friedemann: When The Trucks Stop Running

    The modern trucking fleet is living on borrowed time
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, August 21, 2016, 3:59 PM

    99

    Alice Friedemann is a transportation expert sounding the alarm on the unsustainable nature of our modern trucking system, which is critical for delivering goods where they need to be, when they need to be, in our just-in-time economy.

    The world's trucking fleet is remarkably dependent on petroleum and, for a number of reasons she outlines in this interview, is not feasibly able to shift over to electricity or other alternative fuels.

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  • What Should I Do?

    In Praise of Motorbikes

    Transportation alternatives for declining energy
    by Steady Footsteps

    Sunday, December 7, 2014, 8:52 PM

    8

    Vietnam was and is a nation that travels predominantly on two wheels. Uncle Ho's supply chain, consisting of tough human beings propelling supply-laden bicycles, proved equal to the challenge of defeating the US, whose petroleum-powered network of supply lines spanned the globe. Even today, while cars and trucks clog the avenues of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, much of the rest of Vietnam sits astride two wheels.

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  • Blog
    © Andrey Armyagov | Dreamstime.com

    America the Vulnerable

    History warns we're sleepwalking towards collapse
    by JHK

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 12:13 AM

    14

    For most people, the collapse of civilizations is a subject much more appetizingly viewed in the rearview mirror than straight ahead down whatever path or roadway we are on.

    Jared Diamond wrote about the collapse of earlier civilizations to great acclaim and brisk sales, in a nimbus of unimpeachable respectability. The stories he told about bygone cultures gone to seed were, above all, dramatic. No reviewers or other intellectual auditors dissed him for suggesting that empires inevitably run aground on the shoals of resource depletion, population overshoot, changes in the weather, and the diminishing returns of complexity.

    Yet these are exactly the same problems that industrial-technocratic societies face today, and those of us who venture to discuss them are consigned to a tin-foil-hat brigade, along with the UFO abductees and Bigfoot trackers. This is unfortunate, but completely predictable, since the sunk costs in all the stuff of daily life (freeways, malls, tract houses) are so grotesquely huge that letting go of them is strictly unthinkable. We’re stuck with a very elaborate setup that has no future, but we refuse to consider the consequences…

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  • Blog

    A Quiet Revolution in Bicycles: Recapturing a Role as Utilitarian People-Movers (Part II)

    by Cycle9

    Tuesday, December 7, 2010, 5:08 AM

    1

    This post initially appeared on CM.com in June 2009. Given its continued relevance, we’re republishing it as part of our ‘What Should I Do?‘ series.

    So you’re inspired to try more biking… 

    Now what?

    If you haven’t yet read Part I of this article, please do.  After learning about Peak Oil a few years back, I decided to get a cargo bicycle setup with an electric assist as an alternative to using a car for around-town trips. I had been a cycling enthusiast for about 20 years at that point, and I had prior experience tinkering with electric bicycles. During my college years, I worked in a bike shop and commuted daily by bike. In 1994, I ordered and installed my first electric add-on kit, consisting of a very basic setup – a friction roller against the tire, activated by a two-speed toggle switch on the handlebar. I also happen to have a degree in Physics, which helped a lot with debugging early electric bike equipment that was not quite ready for prime time.

    Nevertheless, when I decided to take on this project in 2007, I quickly found out that it wasn’t a simple undertaking, despite my fairly broad experience. The local bike shops were not enthused by this project. They wouldn’t touch electric assist, and ordering an Xtracycle kit to convert my bike to a cargo hauler was something they were decidedly lukewarm about. Given that attitude, I decided to just order the parts through the Internet and do it myself. 

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  • Blog

    A Quiet Revolution in Bicycles: Recapturing a Role as Utilitarian People-Movers (Part I)

    by Cycle9

    Saturday, December 4, 2010, 4:06 PM

    0

    This post initially appeared on CM.com in June 2009. Given its continued relevance, we’re republishing it as part of our ‘What Should I Do?‘ series.

    Introduction

    Bicycles were invented over 200 years ago and were used for many years as significant and efficient means of human transport. But over the past 40 years, bicycles lost their status in the US as human transportation vehicles, due to inexpensive oil and far-flung suburban development. Since both of those factors favored automobile usage, the bicycle industry responded by refocusing their marketing strategy to promote bikes as recreational objects, only to be carted out on weekends and vacation time. 

    For many years this has been the status quo, with the typical bikes available in many bike shops catering to the weekend warrior, not the utilitarian cyclist. But in response to concerns over oil dependency and the environment, a quiet revolution started brewing in the mid-1990s that produced new bicycle designs and features, reinventing the bicycle as a significant mode of transportation. These new developments include cargo-carrying capacity for passengers and their stuff, plus compact, quiet, efficient, electric-assist motors that can extend the biker’s traveling range and encourage biking more often.

    This article is intended to provide a broad overview of the recent developments that make the bicycle a practical utilitarian vehicle for daily transportation. In Part 1, I introduce the concepts of cargo bicycles and electrical bicycles and address the question, “Why do these developments help make a bicycle a great personal transportation option for those concerned about Peak Energy?” Then, in the upcoming Part 2, I will get into the nitty-gritty details of the products and designs available, addressing the questions, “What are the features, how much do they cost, and where can I buy one?”

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  • Blog

    A Quiet Revolution in Bicycles: Recapturing a Role as Utilitarian People-Movers (Part I)

    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, June 12, 2009, 12:08 PM

    0

    One of my greatest joys in this line of work is getting to meet people who are actively engaged in creating the change they wish to see.  This blog post is a guest contribution by Morgan Giddings and is the first of a two-part series that will address the ins, outs, hows, and whys of using bicycles for transportation. 

    Morgan is not only knowledgeable but experienced in actually using a bicycle as a primary means of transportation.  Her full-time job and young children are part of that equation.  As a father, I am quite impressed with all that this implies, and as someone who also actively translates what needs doing into real action, I am pleased to be on the same team with Morgan.

    Please join me in welcoming her  important contribution to our awareness of what is possible, as she shares her knowledge about  the practical insertion of a bicycle into one’s daily routine.

    Please note:  I have started "The Definitive Bicycle Thread" in the Forums for ongoing discussion on this topic.  Comments related to this blog post should be posted there. 

    Best,
    Chris Martenson 


    Introduction

    Bicycles were invented over 200 years ago and were used for many years as significant and efficient means of human transport. But over the past 40 years, bicycles lost their status in the US as human transportation vehicles, due to inexpensive oil and far-flung suburban development. Since both of those factors favored automobile usage, the bicycle industry responded by refocusing their marketing strategy to promote bikes as recreational objects, only to be carted out on weekends and vacation time. 

    Read More »