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Tag Archives: slow money

  • Podcast

    Marco Vangelisti: Investing Outside Of Wall Street

    Putting your money to work locally & sustainably
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, November 14, 2016, 6:29 PM

    5

    Marco Vangelisti worked in high finance for 25 years before self-ejecting from that industry and dedicating his focus to providing capital to local and sustainable ventures. He is a founding member of Slow Money, as well as a founding member of the National Coalition for Community Capital.

    His entire portfolio now is invested at the local level or in sustainability-oriented vehicles where he has visibility into its direct impact. This kind of investing is a lot more complicated than simply buying shares off of ETRADE with a few mouse clicks, but is worth the effort. By deploying our capital locally into ventures that we value, we use our savings to help create the kind of future we want to live into.

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  • Podcast

    Woody Tasch: Slow Money

    Putting capital to work for local food resilience
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, September 21, 2014, 7:31 PM

    11

    The Slow Money movement focuses on deploying capital, locally, to strengthen small food enterprises. Its goal is to improve the quality, dependability and sustainability of our food source, while financially nurturing communities and delivering an attractive return on investment to native investors.

    Woody Tasch is the founder and chairman of Slow Money – in this week's podcast, he and Chris discuss the templates his organization is piloting across over 350 ventures in local food production, processing, distribution and marketing.

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  • Blog

    Reminder: Chris in California October 12-17

    by Adam Taggart

    Thursday, October 6, 2011, 3:35 PM

    0

    We’re re-posting this as a reminder that Chris’ trip to northern California is just one week away. If you live west of the Rockies and want to meet Chris in person, now’s your chance.

    Attention West Coasters: Chris will be in California October 12-17, appearing at several public venues.

    For the chance to meet the man in person, get out your calendars – his itinerary is below.

    His appearances will address recent developments across the Three E’s and use the Crash Course framework to explain which future scenarios are most probable. Chris will present his recommendations for weathering a future defined by “less”: focusing on developing resiliency at the individual and local levels in enterprise, energy and agriculture. Three questions emerge and will be explored: what should we start doing, what should we continue doing and what should we stop doing?

    Here are the venues where you can catch Chris during his West Coast tour:

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  • Blog

    Slow Money: Raising Investment Capital For Local Enterprise

    by woodytasch

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011, 6:07 PM

    0

    I sometimes wonder whether the “numb” in numbers was just waiting for the 21st Century. As in what my friend Lee said to me over breakfast the other day, after a cursory discussion about the week’s stock market turbulence: “I try to keep up, but it’s pretty mind-numbing.”

    Within a few minutes of that remark, the following sentence came from the radio: “Investors are struggling to make sense of this week’s volatility.”

    Wild gyrations in the Dow. Joblessness claims. The national debt. The price of gold. The price of oil. Retail sales. The body count from Afghanistan. Yen to the dollar. The number of cities each day in August that had their hottest day on record. $24 billion (McDonalds’ 2010 revenue). 1,100 (McDonalds locations in China). One every 18 hours (number of Yum! Brands restaurants–KFC, Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, A&W–opening in China). One-fifth (per capita water consumption in China compared to that in the U.S.). 19,000 (average earthworm population per acre in Boone County, Iowa). 1.9 million (average earthworm population per acre on Thompson Farm, an organic farm in Boone County, Iowa). 5.79 billion (record number of NYSE shares traded on August 16, 2011). Three trillion (annual Ogallala Aquifer overdraft, in gallons). 2.7 (average annual rate of depletion of the Ogallala Aquifer, in feet per year). 200 (average thickness of the Ogallala Aquifer, in feet). Number of years until the Ogallala Aquifer is completely depleted (do the math).

    So, how’s that morning coffee going down?

    These are certainly mind-numbing numbers. They are the numbers that shout the Big Story of the 21st Century: mankind heading towards a global population of 10 billion, and the global economy growing from $60 trillion per year to who-knows-what, and everywhere we look, stresses and strains on political, economic, cultural, and ecological systems.

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  • Blog

    Chris in California October 12-17

    by Adam Taggart

    Thursday, September 15, 2011, 5:26 PM

    0

    Attention West Coasters: Chris will be in California October 12-17, appearing at several public venues.

    For the chance to meet the man in person, get out your calendars – his itinerary is below.

    His appearances will address recent developments across the Three E’s and use the Crash Course framework to explain which future scenarios are most probable. Chris will present his recommendations for weathering a future defined by “less”: focusing on developing resiliency at the individual and local levels in enterprise, energy and agriculture. Three questions emerge and will be explored: what should we start doing, what should we continue doing and what should we stop doing?

    Here are the venues where you can catch Chris during his West Coast tour:

    Read More »

  • Blog

    Bad News and Good News About My Appearance at Slow Money…

    by Chris Martenson

    Thursday, June 10, 2010, 11:45 AM

    0

    I’m writing you from Ålesund, Norway with the urgent update that I will unfortunately not be attending the Slow Money conference and will miss out on the 20-minute panel discussion spot for which I was scheduled on Thursday, June 10. 

    Rest assured this has absolutely nothing to do with the Slow Money organization or the conference, which I still give my very highest recommendation to attend.  I find myself in Norway at the Innotown 2010 conference, filling in for Richard Heinberg, who could not attend at the last minute. Richard had a keynote speaking spot which would have left a large gap in the programming, and my presence ensures that Post Carbon Institute (my speaker’s bureau and another extremely worthy organization) can fulfill their obligations to Innotown and have a place here at this prestigious conference.

    While I’m sorry to miss Slow Money for my own purposes, I feel particularly obliged to anyone who planned to attend the conference in part or in whole to participate in my session with Woody Tasch and Robert Zevin.  To make up for it, I want to personally guarantee that I will hold a special, private session via conference call for anyone who can indicate proof of registration to Slow Money and would like to participate.

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  • Blog

    Investing in the Future with SlowMoney

    by Chris Martenson

    Monday, May 24, 2010, 7:16 PM

    0

    I have been slow to throw my hat into the ring with organizations dedicated to bringing intelligent responses to our predicament. The reason is that I have a list of requirements that have to be met:

    • The proposed actions have to address the real challenges that we face.
    • The organization has to be strictly non-partisan and neutral or silent on a wide range of belief-centered positions.

    I know that doesn’t seem like a very long list of requirements, but it turns out that it eliminates an enormous number of organizations and individuals from consideration as affiliate partners.

    On the first requirement, there are a lot of efforts out there that are either in denial about the actual predicament in which we find ourselves or are approaching solutions in a socially-cautious, status-quo fashion.  Their incremental efforts run a very high risk of being in the category of ‘too little, too late,‘ and are therefore largely ineffective, even if energetic and well-meaning.  Even if I am glad they exist and wish them well, I simply have a hard time getting excited by efforts that, in my opinion, are badly overmatched by the pace and scope of the changes that are coming.

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