Investing in precious metals 101

Tag Archives: resource depletion

  • Insider

    Off The Cuff: The Earth’s Lament

    We pollute & deplete, but for no real gain
    by Adam Taggart

    Thursday, June 6, 2019, 8:12 AM

    10

    In this week’s Off The Cuff podcast, Chris discusses:

    • We’re Polluting & Depleting, For No Real Gain
    • Why Shale Oil Reflects Our Wrongheadedness
    • Time Is Fast Running Out Before The Real Consequences Arrive
    • But There Are Many Ways To Do Things Better

    This week Chris looks at the big picture: the planet’s resources and humanity’s mad dash to consume them. We are depleting millions-year-old treasures — which will never renew in our species’ future — while leaving poison and pollution behind in the effort.

    Even if we only prioritize the well-being of those currently alive (screw those pesky future generations!), time is running out on us. Our current trajectory is having increasing negative repercussions, which will only intensify over the coming decades.

    The silver lining to this is that we *can* be doing things better. We already have plenty of models for living regernatively. We just need to embrace them. But will we?

    Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio as well as all of PeakProsperity.com’s other premium content.

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  • Daily Digest
    Image by Tapping The World, Flickr Creative Commons

    Daily Digest 5/30 – New Global Financial Crisis Looming, Italy’s Debt Bubble Pop Heard Around The World

    by saxplayer00o1

    Wednesday, May 30, 2018, 2:49 PM

    3
    • Study: Some public pensions funds could run dry in downturn
    • Report: Pennsylvanians carrying $33.2 billion in credit card debt
    • Venezuela warns businesses not to halt payments amid currency overhaul
    • Soros warns new global financial crisis looming
    • Why are nearly 1 in 4 Millennials still living with mom? Lack of affordable housing
    • Italy’s debt bubble pop heard around the world
    • Copper supply shock hits India as Vedanta group's Tuticorin plant ordered to close
    • Lawmakers approve $366 million sales tax bill (Louisiana)
    • Billionaire George Soros outlines his plan to save Europe
    • Knives are too sharp and filing them down is solution to soaring violent crime, judge says
    • Hepatitis A is usually not a problem to recover from. But in Michigan, 27 people died since this outbreak began.
    • With urgency, VA deploys new capabilities to fix services almost every day
    • NASA virtual exoplanet tours bureau lets anyone ‘vacation’ in space
    • Oil Is Still Going To $80
    • Scientists Are Hinting at The Existence of a Strange New Type of Particle
    • Garbage Island: An Ocean Full Of Plastic

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  • Blog
    change.org

    Running Out Of Room

    No energy = no goods and services = no economy
    by Chris Martenson

    Thursday, November 2, 2017, 12:02 AM

    69

    The idea of an 'industrial economy' is an extremely recent human invention. And we’ve staked quite a lot on its continuation.

    But it faces a massive predicament: It’s running out of resources.

    When talking about the “economy”, we're really referring to the flow of goods and services — which are themselves entirely dependent on energy. No energy = no goods and services = no economy. It’s really that simple.

    So to track where we are in this story, put on your ‘energy goggles’. If you do, you can discover quite a lot.

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  • Podcast

    Tim Jackson: The High Price Of Growth

    A finite planet cannot sustain infinite economic growth
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, October 16, 2017, 7:31 PM

    23

    Modern society is addicted to and engineered for perpetual economic growth.

    Now, a fourth-grader can tell you that nothing can grow forever, especially if you have finite resources. But that simple realization is eluding today's central planners, despite multiplying evidence that growth is becoming harder and harder to come by.

    This week's podcast guest is Professor Tim Jackson, sustainability advisor for the UK government, professor of sustainable development at the University of Surrey and Director of CUSP. Tim is also a full member of the Club of Rome.

    He explains why the exponential growth rates of today's economies, and their associated rates of resource extraction/consumption, will not be able to continue for much longer — and why a pursuit of "prosperity" (defined much more broadly than simple consumerism) is a much healthier goal for humanity.

     

     

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  • Podcast

    Ugo Bardi: The Banquet of Consequences

    Why we've earned the coming future of resource scarcity
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, April 5, 2014, 6:15 PM

    23

    Everybody, soon or late, sits down to a banquet of consequences.

    ~ Robert Louis Stevenson

    "Growth is the problem; not the solution" says Ugo Bardi, Professor of Physical Chemistry at Italy's University of Florence and author of the recent book Extracted: How the Quest for Mineral Wealth is Plundering the Planet.

    In this week's podcast, Professor Bardi and Chris discuss resource depletion and its growing impact on geopolitical events and the world economy.

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  • Blog
    © Andrey Armyagov | Dreamstime.com

    America the Vulnerable

    History warns we're sleepwalking towards collapse
    by JHK

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013, 12:13 AM

    14

    For most people, the collapse of civilizations is a subject much more appetizingly viewed in the rearview mirror than straight ahead down whatever path or roadway we are on.

    Jared Diamond wrote about the collapse of earlier civilizations to great acclaim and brisk sales, in a nimbus of unimpeachable respectability. The stories he told about bygone cultures gone to seed were, above all, dramatic. No reviewers or other intellectual auditors dissed him for suggesting that empires inevitably run aground on the shoals of resource depletion, population overshoot, changes in the weather, and the diminishing returns of complexity.

    Yet these are exactly the same problems that industrial-technocratic societies face today, and those of us who venture to discuss them are consigned to a tin-foil-hat brigade, along with the UFO abductees and Bigfoot trackers. This is unfortunate, but completely predictable, since the sunk costs in all the stuff of daily life (freeways, malls, tract houses) are so grotesquely huge that letting go of them is strictly unthinkable. We’re stuck with a very elaborate setup that has no future, but we refuse to consider the consequences…

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