Tag Archives: portfolio

  • Insider

    Resuming The Crash Position

    Actions to take before the market breaks
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, September 27, 2019, 2:30 PM

    12

    Executive Summary

    • My recent portfolio changes & the rationale behind each
    • 6 strategies for positioning your portfolio for the next market downturn
    • Deciding which strategies are most appropriate for you

    If you have not yet read Part 1: Realistically, What’s Left To Power Asset Prices Higher?, available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

    This is an update to the premium report Assume The Crash Position issued in March of this year. It details the changes I’m now making in my portfolio, which  build off of the logic used in the two earlier short positions I notified Peak Prosperity insiders about.

    The first was back in fall of 2018, which yielded a 50%+ return when the market fell between October and September.

    The second yielded similar 50%+ gains when stocks fell in May of this year.

    But before continuing further, let me make a few things absolutely clear. This is NOT personal financial advice. This material is for educational purposes only, and as an aid for you to discuss these options more intelligently with your professional financial adviser(s) before taking any action.

    (If you do not have a financial advisor or do not feel comfortable with your current adviser’s expertise with the investment vehicles discussed in this Part 2, then consider scheduling a free portfolio review/consultation with our endorsed advisor)

    Suffice it to say, everything discussed in this report should be reviewed with your financial adviser before taking any action. Am I being excessively repetitive here in order to drive this point home? Good…

    Ok, with that said, here are the specific new positions I have taken in my portfolio… (Enroll now to continue reading)

     

    Enroll Now
    Or Sign In with your enrolled account.

    Read More »

  • Blog
    livelifehappy.com

    Better A Year Early Than A Day Too Late

    Preparation only has value if it's done in advance
    by Adam Taggart

    Tuesday, August 22, 2017, 5:42 AM

    7

    When it comes, change happens swiftly. And life after — for better or worse — is forever different.

    I've witnessed this time and time again since co-founding Peak Prosperity. And pretty much every time, I notice that the vast majority of people — including many of the the watchful and preparation-minded folks who read this site — are caught by surprise.

    Read More »

  • Podcast

    New Harbor: A Time For Staying Out Of Harms Way

    Preserving your financial capital
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, January 24, 2016, 5:16 PM

    9

    Given the brutal start to the markets in the first three weeks of 2016, we thought it a good time to check in with the team at New Harbor Financial. We have had them on our podcast periodically over the past years as the market churned to ever new highs, and have always appreciated their skepticism of these liquidity-driven ""markets"" as well as their unwavering commitment to risk management should the party in stocks end suddenly.

    So, how is their risk-managed approach faring now that the S&P 500 has suddenly dropped 8% since Christmas? Quite well. Their general portfolio is flat for the year so far — evidence that caution, prudence and hedging can indeed preserve capital during market downdrafts.

    We've invited the New Harbor team back on this week to hear their latest assessment on the markets, as well as how they're approaching their portfolio positioning moving forward.

    Read More »

  • Podcast

    Ask the Adviser: Creating a Sustainable Portfolio

    Invest before you speculate
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, October 20, 2012, 3:55 AM

    2

    In this latest installment of Ask the Advisor, Chris and Bob Fitzwilson focus on how to approach creating an investment portfolio with the tenets of the Crash Course in mind.

    Bob explains how he believes a prudent process starts with securing the essentials for resiliency; in other words, investing in the resources that will sustain yourself and your family regardless of how the financial markets perform. These are things like your local food supply, your homestead, your health, etc. Only after you've created a plan for procuring those should you then focus on what do with any funds left over.

    Then the focus should be on your desired lifestyle. Ask yourself: How much do I need to meet my base-case needs and wishes for my family?

    Read More »

  • Blog

    Starting Your Investment Plan

    by Travlin

    Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 12:02 AM

    0

    This post has been elevated from the enrolled forums section. It is the introductory piece of a series on ‘How to construct an Investment Portfolio’ authored by user Travlin (enrolled members can access the entire series here).

    Investment planning should be kept as simple as possible while still meeting your needs. As a self-directed investor, it is important to me to evaluate the situation, define what I want to accomplish, and decide how to get there. I find that putting this in writing helps me organize and clarify my thoughts into a useful assessment. This does not have to follow a rigid format as long as it is coherent. From this I can begin to structure the portfolio I need, but that is a separate topic.

    Below is my latest assessment. It has three parts

    1. Situation Analysis
    2. Investment Needs
    3. Investment Strategy

    This is offered as a model to show you one way it can be done. There are many others. Feel free to use this model as is, or revise it to suit your views and circumstances. 

    Read More »

  • Blog

    Straight Talk with Tyler Durden: The U.S. Is Free-Falling Into Bankruptcy

    by Adam Taggart

    Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 2:46 PM

    0

    “Straight Talk” features thinking from notable minds that the ChrisMartenson.com audience has indicated it wants to learn more about.  Readers submit the questions they want addressed and our guests take their best crack at answering. The comments and opinions expressed by our guests are their own.

    This week’s Straight Talk contributor is Tyler Durden, founder and chief demagogue of the popular econoblog Zero Hedge. Zero Hedge’s mission is to bring back a more critical, rigorous, and informed style of commentary and synthesis for the professional investing public. The blog has experienced explosive growth in it’s two-year existence, due in part to its prolific coverage of financial events as well as its unapologetic (some say controversial) editorial approach, which is often highly critical of today’s economic and political leaders.


     

    1. What led you to start Zero Hedge? Was there a particular story or moment? For many of our readers, you have become the CNN of the Great Collapse (this is seen as a positive thing). Is this what you set out to be?

    Zero Hedge was started two years ago in the aftermath of the Great Financial Crash, as coined by Bill Buckler, when we realized there is a substantial vacuum in information distribution, and to a lesser extent, processing. The financial media world was (and to a great extent still is) dominated by journalists who were learning finance on the job and thus were incapable of putting the dots together on most stories under investigation.

    Read More »

  • Blog

    Guest Post: Investing In One Lesson

    by machinehead

    Friday, September 17, 2010, 1:20 AM

    0
    by machinehead

    Many of you will recognize today’s author from his insightful comments that appear frequently across ChrisMartenson.com.

    It sucks to try earning income from investments these days. Until about ten years ago, most folks assumed they could make an easy 5 percent from safe, risk-free vehicles such as T-bills or CDs. With $500,000 saved, you could generate $25,000 in annual income. Them days are gone! Today, thanks to the Federal Reserve’s Japanese-style ZIRP (Zero Interest Rate Policy) regime, one-year T-bills yield only 0.25%, while one-year CDs average 1.25% — a mere $6,250 annually on a $500,000 account.

    Read More »