Investing in precious metals 101

Tag Archives: money supply

  • Daily Digest
    Image by frankieleon, Flickr Creative Commons

    Daily Digest 11/21 – Bitcoin-Rigging Criminal Probe Launched, Who’s Going to Pay for LA’s Pension Plans?

    by saxplayer00o1

    Wednesday, November 21, 2018, 3:04 PM

    1
    • Parks chief warns of 'massive cuts, huge layoffs' as soon as 2020 (Chicago)
    • No more excuses. Fix Pa. pension funds | Editorial
    • Who’s Going to Pay for LA’s Unsustainable Pension Plans?
    • ECB Official Warns QE Exit Could Spell Trouble for Italy's Debt
    • U.S. recession chances edge up, risk Fed delivers fewer hikes: Reuters poll
    • BOJ's Kuroda rules out early end of negative rate policy (Japan)
    • Unthinkable?
    • Bitcoin-Rigging Criminal Probe Focused on Tie to Tether
    • NY BitLicense Approval, Blockchain for Energy Commodities, CFTC Enforcement, Advertising Use Cases and More

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  • Blog
    © Georgios Kollidas | Dreamstime.com

    Say Goodbye to the Purchasing Power of the Dollar

    Mr. Bernanke goes to Crazytown
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, March 25, 2013, 3:29 AM

    108

    On a long solo car trip this past weekend, I downloaded several podcasts to listen to as the miles passed. One was a classic: The Invention of Money, originally released by NPR's Planet Money team back in January of 2011. I highly recommend listening (or re-listening) to it in full.

    The podcast is a great reminder of how any currency in a monetary system is a fabricated construct. A simpler way to explain this is to say it has value simply because we believe it does.

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  • Blog
    © Foxindustry | Dreamstime.com

    The Tangled Relationship Between Wealth & Money

    And why we're focusing on the wrong economic 'fixes'
    by John Michael Greer

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013, 1:43 PM

    22

    One of the most dangerous mistakes possible to make in trying to understand the shape of the economic future is to think of the fundamental concepts of economics as simple and uncontroversial.  They aren’t. 

    In economics, as in all other fields, the fundamentals are where disguised ideologies and unexamined presuppositions are most likely to hide out, precisely because nobody questions them.

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  • Podcast

    Paul Brodsky: Central Banks are Nearing the ‘Inflate or Die’ Stage

    So hold tightly to your gold
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, July 6, 2012, 10:46 PM

    26

    "It's impossible to have a political solution to a balance sheet problem" says Paul Brodsky, bond market expert and co-founder of QB Asset Management.

    The world has simply gotten itself into too much debt. There are creditors that expect to be paid, and debtors that are having an increasingly difficult time making their coupon payments. No amount of political or policy intervention is going to change that reality. (Unless a global "debt jubilee" transpires, which Paul thinks is unlikely).

    Looking at the global monetary base, Paul sees it dwarfed by the staggering amount of debts that need to be repaid or serviced. The reckless use of leverage has resulted in a chasm between total credit and the money that can service it.

    So how will this debt overhang be resolved?

    Central bank money printing — and lots of it — thinks Paul.

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  • Blog

    Straight Talk with Mike Shedlock (aka “Mish”)

    by Adam Taggart

    Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 4:16 AM

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    Today marks the launch of our new and (hopefully) regularly recurring “Straight Talk” series, featuring thinking from notable minds the ChrisMartenson.com audience has indicated it wants to learn more about. Readers submit the questions they want addressed and our guests take their best crack at answering. Our hopes are high you’ll enjoy the expert insights and alternative perspectives this new series brings. 

    Our inaugural Straight Talk contributor is Mike Shedlock, author of Mish’s Global Economic Trend Analysis, one of the most visited and respected economic blogs on the Web. Mish is an outspoken deflationist and outlines his rationale for being so in his answers to our questions. He is also a registered investment advisor representative for SitkaPacific Capital Management. 


    1. You’ve gone from mainframe computer programming analyst (in 2005) to being one of the most widely-read econobloggers in the world today. To what extent do you attribute your competitive advantage to holding a non-traditional background vs. the more ‘classically’ trained analysts and commentators?

    Mish: It certainly helps not having a background in economics as taught by academia today. Nearly everyone in academia is a Keynesian or Monetarist.

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  • Blog

    Martenson Report – Inflation vs. Deflation – What Comes Next?

    by Chris Martenson

    Sunday, June 14, 2009, 8:24 PM

    0

    There’s a new Martenson Report ready for enrolled members.

    Link to:  Inflation vs. Deflation – What Comes Next?

    Here’s a snippet:

    One of the key questions of our day, especially for those who have wealth to protect, is, “What’s going to happen to the dollar?”  More specifically, do we foresee an increase in the value of money going forward (deflation), or a decrease in the value of money (inflation)? Should we reserve a small amount of concern for the possibility of hyperinflation, which means the rapid and often total destruction of a currency?

    There happens to be a lot of discussion around this topic these days. Unfortunately, much of it is confusing and contradictory, because far too much misinformation is included in the mix. So let’s begin by getting ourselves on firm footing before we look at the data.

    (…)

    Inflation correlates poorly with growth in the monetary base, making that statistic relatively useless as a predictor of inflation. However, inflation correlates extremely well with growth in government spending, meaning that we’d do well to track that statistic closely.

    The current economic crisis is being fought tooth and nail by a determined Federal Reserve (in the role of the "enabler") and an equally-determined US government (in the role of the heavy-lifter, assuming all the lion’s share of the long-term debt and risk). Together, these institutions have virtually consigned future generations to the enormous challenge of wrestling with bloated budgets in desperate need of trimming, further compounded by coinciding with periods of high inflation.

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