Tag Archives: Medicine

  • Podcast

    Dave Janda: Bad Medicine

    A doctor's reasons for quitting the profession
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, May 15, 2016, 6:57 PM

    46

    In our ongoing discussion of how our Health Care system (or more aptly-named "Sick Care" system) has been hijacked by those who profit most from it, we interview Dr. Dave Janda this week, who recently and very publicly announced he was walking away from his clinical practice in protest of how poorly the quality-to-cost ratio has dropped in his profession.

    Dr. Janda's perspective is informed not just from his years as a practicing surgeon and researcher, but also through his involvement with health initiatives for the Reagan and Bush I administrations, as well as the National Institute of Health. His overall conclusion is that the health system now exists to serves its corporate and administrative owners, to the detriment of patients and practitioners.

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  • Daily Prep

    6 Medicinal Herbs to Grow at Home

    Medicine in the garden
    by Jason Wiskerchen

    Thursday, January 28, 2016, 5:23 PM

    0

    http://www.motherearthliving.com/gardening/medicinal-herbs-ze0z1303zgar.aspx?newsletter=1&utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=01.28.16%20MEL&utm_term=MEL%20eNews

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  • Daily Digest
    Image by wharman, Flickr Creative Commons

    Daily Digest 5/30 – Wine Country Faces Fiscal Crisis, Drought Emaciates Cattle In NM

    by DailyDigest

    Thursday, May 30, 2013, 2:49 PM

    8
    • Back to Basics – Gold, Silver, and the Economy
    • "Major Shocks Will Become The Norm From Now On"
    • US targets digital currency in huge fraud probe
    • OECD: Europe's Recession Threatens Entire Global Economy
    • ‘A disaster in slow motion’: Wine country latest California region to face fiscal crisis
    • How Islamist militancy threatens Africa
    • China's dead pig scandal ushers in hard times for fishermen and hog farmers
    • Portland, Maine Doctor Forgoes Insurance To Provide Affordable Care To Community
    • GMO lose Europe – victory for environmental organisations
    • Weather disasters increasing, insurance industry warns
    • GM salmon can breed with wild fish and pass on genes
    • Oops: Europe’s green mandates have resulted in more imported coal and wood consumption
    • Harper government nixed reviews for some oil sands projects following warnings of water disruption
    • Corn Growers Turn to Pesticides After Genetically Modified Seeds Fail
    • In China, 'cancer villages' a reality of life
    • Officials: NM ranch had 1,000 emaciated cattle

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  • Daily Digest
    Image by Fotos Gov/Ba, Flickr Creative Commons

    Daily Digest 4/12 – Ten Diminishing Energy Trends, America’s Health (Dis)advantage

    by DailyDigest

    Friday, April 12, 2013, 3:16 PM

    6
    • A Tipping Point In The Financial System – Part 2
    • British shops ration baby milk as Chinese demand surges
    • Obama’s Budget Is a Ridiculous Charade: Doug Casey
    • Jobs report, David Stockman, U.S. economy, gold
    • No Direction Home
    • America's Health (Dis)advantage
    • Carmen Reinhart: "No Doubt. Our Pensions Are Screwed."
    • Australia’s Woodside shelves US$45B Browse LNG project
    • For the Price of the Iraq War, The U.S. Could Have a 100% Renewable Power System
    • 10 Diminishing Trends in the World of Energy

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  • Daily Digest
    Image by sacks08, Flickr Creative Commons

    Daily Digest 4/10 – Americans Skipping Meds To Save Money, Italians’ Spending Power Crumbles

    by saxplayer00o1

    Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 3:14 PM

    1
    • Blue Angels Grounded by Budget Cuts for Rest of 2013
    • Cyprus Faces Risk of Payments Freeeze, Budget Shortfall Looms
    • Arizona gold bill moving forward
    • Five million households in debt to energy firms
    • Fitch Cuts China Yuan Debt Rating on Local Government Borrowing
    • French economy stalls as budget deficit grows
    • Stately Detroit Homes Rot As Appraisals Stall Sales
    • US homeless numbers expected to rise as spending cuts deepen
    • Italians' spending power crumbles in recession
    • Bass Says Japan Bondholders’ Reaction to Stimulus Telling
    • Interest on government student loans set to double this summer
    • Americans Skipping Prescription Meds To Save Money

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  • Blog

    The Keys to Transitioning Healthcare: Empowerment, Education, & Prevention

    by suziegruber

    Wednesday, December 1, 2010, 5:53 AM

    0

    A few months ago, I developed red spots on my face and neck that were kind of itchy.  After another day or so, the spots had progressed down my torso and onto my thighs, so I decided to go to a doctor.  Although I have health insurance, at the time I did not have a primary care physician, so seeing a doctor quickly proved to be difficult.  Most everyone I called told me to go the emergency room, a ridiculously expensive suggestion, given that my situation was certainly not a life-threatening emergency.  I finally got an appointment with a nurse practitioner at a local clinic.  She hurriedly looked at the red spots, pronounced that I had hives, and immediately decided to give me a steroid injection and to prescribe a week-long dose of Prednisone.  There was no discussion of reasoning for her prescription, likely symptom progression, or treatment options.

    I know that steroids significantly impact my body through increased anxiety, difficulty sleeping, and suppressed immune response, and I was about to leave on a month long trip, so I really didn’t want any of these side effects.  I slowed her down long enough to get her to tell me what I could expect if I didn’t take the shot or the Prednisone.  She told me the hives would likely progress through the rest of my body, enter my lungs and then cause difficulty breathing, and that I definitely needed both the injection and the Prednisone.  By this point, I internally questioned her judgment due to her extreme prognosis and lack of willingness to engage with me, so I accepted the shot and decided to mull over whether or not to fill the Prednisone prescription.  That afternoon I spoke with a friend of mine who is an MD (I should have called him first), and he said that I likely would not need the Prednisone and that I should see how it goes for a couple of days.  I did not need the Prednisone and the hives disappeared in a week or so.

    So why am I sharing this story? In my opinion, health care remains one of the thorniest problems that we face, because even with relatively abundant cheap oil, our current system serves us poorly.

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  • Blog

    What Should I Do? The Basics of Resilience (Part 5 – Health and First Aid)

    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, August 13, 2010, 2:05 PM

    0

    Note:  This article is part of a series on personal preparation to help you answer the question, “What should I do?”  Our goal is to provide a safe, rational, relatively comfortable experience for those who are just coming to the realization that it would be prudent to take precautionary steps against an uncertain future.  Those who have already taken these basic steps (and more) are invited to help us improve what is offered here by contributing comments, as this content is meant to be dynamic and improve over time.

    The Future of Your Health

    Like our “just in time” food system, our modern medical infrastructure is highly complex; it functions well only under controlled circumstances and with abundantly available specific resources.  As with food, the ease with which we’ve accessed medical services over recent decades has invited us to reduce our health self-sufficiency.  We’ve become so sheltered from the health risks our forefathers faced that we’re especially vulnerable if we’re ever forced to live without easy access to professional care.

    Taking on a bit more responsibility and a few more preventive steps in one’s personal health is crucial; a must-do in the process of becoming resilient.  Some of the steps recommended for beginners are universal; others depend on your personal needs.  But in all cases, a good dose of foresight and practicality is in order to build some security into the future of your health.  You should plan ahead for the things you know you’ll need: are there medications you take regularly?  Do you wear contact lenses or glasses?  What supplements, hygiene products, or nutritional supplies would you be hard-pressed to live without?

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