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Tag Archives: Jobs

  • Blog
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    The Rise of New Models of Community

    Why they're emerging & what they need to succeed
    by charleshughsmith

    Wednesday, May 7, 2014, 4:14 PM

    2

    In my previous series on the erosion of community, I surveyed a number of conventional explanations for this decades-long trend and discussed 10 other potential factors in the decline of social capital. I concluded that economic need would likely be the driver of a resurgence of community—a need that will only become apparent when the Central State and the debt-based, consumerist-corporate system are no longer able to fulfill their implicit promises of welfare, subsidies, endless credit and secure jobs. In this next installment on community, we look at the possibility that new models are arising beneath the mainstream media’s master narratives that Everything’s fine and The Status Quo is both good and eternal.

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  • Insider
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    How Life Will Change

    Logistics and values in the post-industrial future
    by JHK

    Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 9:16 AM

    48

    Executive Summary

    • In a future defined by diminished economy, due to depleting resources, what can we expect?
    • A return to "old-style" cultural norms looks inevitable for:
      • Spirituality
      • Trust & Reputation
      • Values & Virtues
      • Leadership & Order
      • Education
      • Commerce
      • Jobs & Work

    If you have not yet read Are You Crazy To Continue Believing In Collapse? available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

    The journey to where we’re going, the transition to the next economy and the society that comes with it, is liable to be harsh and disruptive. Network breakdown will be the order of the day. Money and goods will stop moving. People will lose a lot. They’ll lose property, imagined wealth, comfortable routines, faith in institutions and authorities. In some places they may lose personal security or freedom. Depending on how disorderly politics gets, we may lose family, loved ones, and friends. People will be very unsure of who or what they can depend on. We might expect pervasive desperation, anger, and despair.

    One thing I fully expect is…

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  • Blog
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    You’ve Got No Job!

    A glimpse into the future of (un)employment
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, February 7, 2014, 6:45 AM

    60

    Today, the pundits are a-buzz making sense of the latest lackluster jobs report. Expect much hand-wringing over the impact of the 'polar vortex' and that Punxsutawney Phil saw his shadow.

    But most of us care more about the state of one particular job: our own. How relevant is this latest bit of data to that? Not very.

    So, to better understand the trends in the work environment most likely impact our own paychecks, it will help to look at another bellwether similar to our fuzzy groundhog friend: AOL.

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  • Insider
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    A Fed Insider Comes Clean

    And validates our worst suspicions
    by Chris Martenson

    Wednesday, November 13, 2013, 5:02 AM

    11

    After they behaved badly and almost ruined the entire world financial system while pocketing fat fees along the reckless road they laid down, the big banks got 'made whole' by the Federal Reserve.

    While couched at the time in fancy acronyms, a lot of complexity, and some good old motherhood and apple pie (that is, the Fed talked about helping the economy recover and people get their jobs back), the truth of the matter is simply that the Fed cared only about helping the big banks repair their balance sheets.

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  • Blog
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    Why We All Lose If the Fed Wins

    Fighting the wrong battles
    by Chris Martenson

    Monday, August 19, 2013, 11:20 PM

    81

    If we hold the view that humans are behaving unsustainably in terms of any of the 'three Es'  the economy, energy, or the environment  then any rapid resumption of a paradigm of exponential growth in our consumption of natural resources or in our growth of debt over income simply takes us more quickly to the bitter end of this story.

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  • Daily Digest
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    Daily Digest 7/10 – IMF Cuts Growth Forecast For World Economies, Canadians Struggle With Saving

    by saxplayer00o1

    Wednesday, July 10, 2013, 2:21 PM

    5
    • Illinois lawmakers seek more information in hunt for fix to $97 billion pension crisis
    • IMF cuts growth forecast for U.S., world economies
    • Nurses' strike hits Portugal hospitals
    • Seniors find it harder to get home-delivered meals (Florida)
    • Chicago gun violence: 74 people shot, 12 killed over July 4 weekend
    • Job cuts: Mining companies to trim operations by 3,500 (Ghana)
    • Financial Crisis Just a Symptom of Detroit’s Woes
    • Furloughs Have Begun for Nearly 50,000 Full-Time Guardsmen Nationwide, Including Guam
    • Mining services industry forced to adapt to end of coal boom in Queensland's Bowen Basin
    • USDA: One In Six Americans Use Food Stamps
    • Puerto Rico sees surge in homeless population
    • Tuition at 14 Pennsylvania universities to rise 3 percent
    • Eurozone jobless rate worse than OECD average
    • Canadians struggle with retirement saving
    • Italy's rating lowered one notch to BBB: S&P
    • Gold borrowing cost hits post-Lehman high
    • Study: State's pension debt spiked since February (California)

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  • Blog
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    The Dead Weight of Sluggish Global Growth

    Weighing heavier each year
    by Gregor Macdonald

    Tuesday, July 9, 2013, 5:04 PM

    1

    Global Slowdown

    The U.S. economy weakened appreciably in the first quarter of 2013. But what if this weakness persists into the second quarter just completed, and worsens still in the second half of this year? Q1 GDP, as reported on June 26th, was revised lower to just 1.8%. And various indications suggest that Q2 could come in slightly lower still, at 1.6%. Might the U.S. economy be guiding to a long-term GDP of 1.5%? That’s the rate identified by such observers as Jeremy Grantham the rate at which we combine aging demographics, lower fertility rates, high resource costs, and the burdensome legacy of debt. Well, after a four-year reflationary rally in just about everything, and now with an interest-rate shock, the second half of 2013 appears to have more downside rather than upside risk. Have global stock markets started to discount this possibility?

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  • Blog
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    Marking the 4-Year Reflationary Rally: How Much Better Off Are We Really?

    Growing amounts of data show a failure to thrive
    by Gregor Macdonald

    Monday, May 6, 2013, 3:31 PM

    0

    The U.S. stock market rally has recently passed its fourth anniversary after the terrifying lows of March 9, 2009.

    During that time, massive and unconventional reflationary policy from the Federal Reserve has managed to lift the S&P 500 by nearly 70%. But perhaps even more improbably, it has finally (?) built a floor under U.S. residential real estate prices.

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  • Blog
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    Let’s Stop Fooling Ourselves: Americans Can’t Afford the Future

    Unemployment, taxes & unfunded retirements are squeezing us
    by Adam Taggart

    Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 3:24 PM

    61

    The truth is: The three adult generations in the U.S. are suffering, and their burdens are likely to increase with time. Each is experiencing a squeeze that is making it harder to create value, save capital, and pursue happiness than at any point since WWII. At that point, we were a creditor nation with an economy exploding into dominance on the world stage. Now, however, the U.S. is the largest debtor nation and our economic hegemony is increasingly at seige across a number of fronts.

    A continuation of the status quo is a decision to sleepwalk face-first into the constraints hurtling towards us.

    Instead, shouldn't we stop fooling ourselves and ask: What should we be doing differently?

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  • Blog

    Time to Choose

    A fundamentals-driven breakout seems imminent. But which dir
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, February 8, 2013, 11:44 AM

    52

    Whether you're aware of it or not, a great battle is being waged around us.

    It is a war of two opposing narratives: the future of our economy and our standard of living.

    The dominant story, championed by flotillas of press releases and parading talking heads, tells an inspiring tale of recovery and return to growth. 

    The other side, less visible but with a full armament of high-caliber data, tells a very different story. One of growing instability, downside risk, and inequality.

    As different as they are in substance, they both share one fundamental prediction and this is why you should care: This battle is about to break. And when it does, one side will turn out to be much more 'right' than the other. The time for action has arrived. To position yourself in the direction of the break you think is most likely to happen.

    It's time to choose a side.

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