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Tag Archives: Jobs

  • Blog
    Green New Deal

    Deconstructing The Green New Deal

    Despite serious flaws, it sparks a needed conversation
    by Chris Martenson

    Tuesday, March 12, 2019, 7:28 AM

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    The Green New Deal (GND) is important as a starting point to have a long, long overdue conversation about energy. Specifically: How are we going to eventually transition away from fossil fuels?

    As such, the proposal — while (very) far from perfect — should not be ignored and deserves our attention. 

    It's also important because it represents the sorts of zig-zags our social and political paths are inceasingly likely to take in the coming future as we're forced to face our looming economic, ecological and energy-related predicaments.

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  • Blog

    Dude, Where's My Cash?

    The growing desperation for income
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, February 17, 2019, 12:45 PM

    38

    A few months back, we issued a report, The Primacy Of Income, declaring the end of the era of capital gains.

    It's conclusion? Wealth accumulation over the next decade will be predominantly driven by income.

    Since issuing that report, developments have only served to underscore that prediction.

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  • Blog
    Edler von Rabenstein/Shutterstock

    The Fuzzy Numbers Behind Initial Job Claims

    Goverment statistics delude us once again
    by Chris Martenson

    Thursday, September 29, 2016, 3:45 PM

    6

    “Fuzzy Numbers” is one of the most popular video chapters within The Crash Course. It explains many of the ways that government statisticians routinely distort economic truth, making things seem rosier than they are.

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  • Blog
    Tatiana Shepeleva/Shutterstock

    Automating Ourselves To Unemployment

    How shortsighted policies are creating a long-term crisis
    by Adam Taggart

    Thursday, April 28, 2016, 1:39 AM

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    In this current era of central planning, malincentives abound. We raced to frack as fast we could for the quick money, while leaving behind a wake of environmental destruction and creating a supply glut that has killed the economics of shale oil. Our stock exchanges sell unfairly-fast price feeds for great sums to elite Wall Street high-frequency-trading firms, and as a result have destroyed investor trust in our financial markets.  The Federal Reserve keeps interest rates historically low to encourage banks to lend money out, yet instead the banks simply lever up to buy Treasurys thereby pocketing vast amounts of riskless free profit. The list goes on and on.

    One particular malincentive has been catching my attention recently, one that feels especially pernicious because it does not seem easily reversible, if at all. For US employers both large and small, it's becoming increasingly less appealing to employ human labor. 

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  • Podcast

    Ed Butowsky: Calculating The True Cost of Living Increase

    Why it's much higher than we're told/sold
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, March 20, 2016, 5:06 PM

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    Over the past decade, we've been told that inflation has been tame — actually below the target the Federal Reserve would like to see. But if that's true, then why does the average household find it harder and harder to get by?

    The ugly reality is that the true annual cost of living is far outpacing the government's reported inflation rate. By nearly 10x in many parts of the country.

    This week, we welcome Ed Butowsky, developer of the Chapwood Index, to the program. His index is a 'real world' measure of how prices are increasing much faster than the wages of the 99% can afford.

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  • Blog
    Eric Von Seggern/Shutterstock

    Mass Layoffs To Return With A Vengeance

    How safe is your job?
    by Adam Taggart

    Wednesday, February 3, 2016, 8:58 PM

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    Remember the mass layoffs of 2008-2009? The US economy shed millions of jobs quickly and relentlessly, as companies died and the rest fought for survival.

    Then the Fed and the US government flooded the banks and the corporate sector with bailouts and handouts. With that crap-ton of liquidity sloshing around, as well as taking on massive amounts of new cheap debt, companies were able to finance their working capital needs, hire workers back, and even buy-back their shares en mass to make themselves look deceptively profitable. The nightmare of 2008 soon became a golden era of recovery.

    Well, 2016 is showing us that that era is over. And as stock prices cease to rise, and in fact fall within many industries, layoffs are beginning to make a return as companies jettison costs in attempt to reduce losses.

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  • Podcast

    Charles Hugh Smith: Fixing The Way We Work

    Closing the wealth gap with meaningful work
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, November 15, 2015, 6:34 PM

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    Charles Hugh Smith returns to the podcast this week to discuss the theme of his new book A Radically Beneficial World: Automation, Technology and Creating Jobs for All.

    Automation and artificial intelligence are changing the landscape of work. Tens of millions of jobs are on track to be eliminated over the next decade or so by these advancing technological innovations in the US alone.

    The way in which our current economy is constructed, the fruits of those cost savings are likely to go into a very small number of private pockets, while the millions of displaced workers will find themselves with no income and no work to do. It's a huge looming problem that is not being address in national dialog right now.

    But there's opportunity to course-correct here. To use our new technologies to increase total productivity in a way that empowers rather than diminishes the individual worker.

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  • Blog
    E_K/Shutterstock

    2014 Year in Review

    The year we piled up risks like a global game of Tetris
    by David Collum

    Friday, December 19, 2014, 4:27 PM

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    I have not seen a year in which so many risks—some truly existential—piled up so quickly. Each risk has its own, often unknown, probability of morphing into a destructive force. Groping for a metaphor—I love metaphors and similes—I feel like we’re in the final throes of a geopolitical Game of Tetris as financial and political authorities race to place the pieces correctly. But the acceleration is palpable. The proximate trigger for pain and ultimately a collapse can be small, as anyone who’s ever stepped barefoot on a Lego knows.

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  • Insider
    Ciprian Stremtan/Shutterstock

    The Trouble with Numbers

    Our 'good' data worsens the closer we look
    by Chris Martenson

    Tuesday, June 10, 2014, 4:06 PM

    4

    According to the ever-strident popular press, the world is in recovery. The stock market says so, the bond market says so, and the politicians and monetary bureaucrats all say so.

    The only trouble is the central banks continue to flood the world with liquidity, something they shouldn't need to be doing if a true recovery were really upon us.

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  • Podcast

    Steen Jakobsen: Expect A 30% Stock Market Correction in 2014

    Presaging economic lows in Q1/Q2 2015
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, June 1, 2014, 9:25 PM

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    This week, Chris talks with Steen Jakobsen, Chief Investment Officer of Saxo Bank. We wanted to see through the eyes of a professional economist, which Steen kindly allowed us to do.

    Steen agrees that central banks have largely failed in their misguided attempts to boost growth via trickle-down programs. Pretty much all the benefits of the recent years of money printing have gone to the upper echelons, with the true engines of growth and jobs — small to medium sized enterprises (SMEs) — getting very little.

    As a result, financial asset prices have been driven up too high, which Steen anticipates will correct at some point in 2014; likely by 30% or so.

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