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Tag Archives: Infrastructure

  • Blog
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    The Demise of the Car

    Doomed by escalating oil and infrastructure costs
    by Gregor Macdonald

    Monday, August 20, 2012, 3:37 PM

    31

    India’s recent series of power blackouts, in which 600 million people lost electricity for several days, reminds us of the torrid pace at which populations in the developing world have moved onto the powergrid. Unfortunately, this great transition has been so rapid that infrastructure has mostly been unable to meet demand. India itself has failed to meets its own power capacity addition targets every year since 1951. This has left roughly one quarter of the country’s population without any (legal) access to electricity. That’s 300 million people out of a population of 1.2 billion. Indeed, it is the daily attempt of the underserved to access power that may have led to India’s recent grid crash.

    But the story of India’s inadequate infrastructure is only one part of the difficult, global transition away from liquid fossil fuels. Over the past decade, the majority of new energy demand has been met not through global oil, but through growth in electrical power.

    Frankly, this should be no surprise. After all, global production of oil started to flatten more than seven years ago, in 2005. And the developing world, which garners headlines for its increased demand for oil, is running mainly on coal-fired electrical power. There is no question that the non-OECD countries are leading the way as liquid-based transport – automobiles and airlines – have entered longterm decline.

    Why, therefore, do policy makers in both the developing and developed world continue to invest in automobile infrastructure?

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  • Blog

    Robert McFarlane: Open Fuel Standards Are Critical To Fighting the Peak Oil Catastrophe

    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, February 25, 2011, 9:47 PM

    0

    “Well, I wish I had a more hopeful answer for you. You’ve nailed it. We really are very likely to face either a disruption violently [by terrorism] or a political decision by OPEC to change the price of oil to $200 to $300 per barrel and literally destroy the global economy.”

    So predicts Robert McFarlane in today’s interview, which focuses on current US energy policy and the risks it faces. Mr. McFarlane’s many decades of public and private service in both the Middle East and global energy markets make him uniquely qualified to opine on the merits (or lack thereof) of the energy strategy that the US is pursuing.

    He sees the US as committed to a foolish “monopoly-fuel” system that leaves it dependent upon and dangerously vulnerable to the actions of external players, including those hostile to US interests. And as the impacts of Peak Oil begin to be felt, he believes it is a near certainty that our country – along with the global economy – will experience great shocks which we have no plans currently in place to address sufficiently. The solution lies in creating a viable market for alternative fuels, which is in our power to do, provided we can muster the politcal and civic will. And do so quickly. 

    Click the play button below to listen to Chris’ interview with Robert C. McFarlane (runtime 34m:39s):

    [swf file=”http://media.chrismartenson.com/audio/robert-mcfarlane-2011-02-25-final.mp3″]

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    In this podcast, Robert and Chris discuss: 

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  • Blog

    Analyzing the Obama Plan

    by Chris Martenson

    Tuesday, January 6, 2009, 3:20 AM

    0

    One of my chief concerns is that our leaders in DC do not really understand the nature of this crisis and are therefore going to either perform ineffective actions or, worse, harmful ones.

    I have been silently crossing my fingers beneath the table, hoping that Obama’s team would figure out that this crisis is unique and will require some non-status-quo solutions.

    Although I titled this "Analyzing the Obama Plan," this is neither a partisan nor political posting, and not even as much a critique of Obama himself as it is an examination of how the DC machinery currently operates.  No one person controls much more than a sliver of the overall process and results that emanate from DC.

    Now that there’s finally some meat on the plan which we can react to, let’s parse the numbers.

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