Tag Archives: Great Recession

  • Insider
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    Off The Cuff: A World Of Rising Interest Rates

    Means a future of falling prices -- in nearly everything
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, December 29, 2017, 8:55 PM

    3

    In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Charles Hugh Smith discuss:

    • The Crashing Treasury Curve
      • Interest rates are on the move
    • Get Ready For Interest Rates To Start Rising
      • The end of a 30-year downtrend
    • When Rates Rise, Prices Will Fall
      • Bonds, stocks, housing — nearly everything
    • What's Next For Bitcoin?
      • We're witnessing a historical moment

    Charles and Chris discuss the implications to anticipate should interest rates indeed start rising. The quick summary? It will change everything…

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  • Blog
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    Why The Markets Are Overdue For A Gigantic Bust

    It's just not possible to print our way to prosperity
    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, June 9, 2017, 11:38 PM

    13

    As much as I try, I simply cannot jump on the bandwagon that says that printing up money out of thin air has any long-term utility for an economy.

    It's just too clear to me that doing so presents plenty of dangers, due what we might call 'economic gravity': What goes up, must also come down.

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  • Blog
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    Where There’s Smoke…

    ...There’s central bank manipulation
    by Chris Martenson

    Saturday, April 22, 2017, 12:26 AM

    1

    Many questions surround the elevated financial asset prices we are faced with today.

    I'm talking not just about the sky-high prices of stocks and bonds, but also of the trillions of dollars’ worth of derivatives that are linked to them.  All are intricately linked together. For instance, stocks are elevated, in part, because bond yields are so low. 

    These questions are important to consider because — if central banks have been too involved and gotten themselves mixed up in trying to ‘wag the dog’ by using elevated financial asset prices as a means to drive economic expansion — then the risk is a big implosion in financial asset prices if their efforts fail.

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  • Blog
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    The Dead Weight of Sluggish Global Growth

    Weighing heavier each year
    by Gregor Macdonald

    Tuesday, July 9, 2013, 5:04 PM

    1

    Global Slowdown

    The U.S. economy weakened appreciably in the first quarter of 2013. But what if this weakness persists into the second quarter just completed, and worsens still in the second half of this year? Q1 GDP, as reported on June 26th, was revised lower to just 1.8%. And various indications suggest that Q2 could come in slightly lower still, at 1.6%. Might the U.S. economy be guiding to a long-term GDP of 1.5%? That’s the rate identified by such observers as Jeremy Grantham the rate at which we combine aging demographics, lower fertility rates, high resource costs, and the burdensome legacy of debt. Well, after a four-year reflationary rally in just about everything, and now with an interest-rate shock, the second half of 2013 appears to have more downside rather than upside risk. Have global stock markets started to discount this possibility?

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  • Blog
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    Marking the 4-Year Reflationary Rally: How Much Better Off Are We Really?

    Growing amounts of data show a failure to thrive
    by Gregor Macdonald

    Monday, May 6, 2013, 3:31 PM

    0

    The U.S. stock market rally has recently passed its fourth anniversary after the terrifying lows of March 9, 2009.

    During that time, massive and unconventional reflationary policy from the Federal Reserve has managed to lift the S&P 500 by nearly 70%. But perhaps even more improbably, it has finally (?) built a floor under U.S. residential real estate prices.

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