Tag Archives: Gardening

  • Daily Prep
    www.motherearthnews.com

    International Homesteading Education Month, September 2012

    Start a local event to share knowledge and learn from others
    by Jason Wiskerchen

    Friday, June 29, 2012, 3:52 PM

    1

    A coordinated effort through Mother Earth News and Grit to connect people in the month of September to share knowledge and get communities to build more resiliency through homesteading efforts and practices. Register an event.  Register as a speaker.

    http://www.motherearthnews.com/homestead-education/homesteading-education-month.aspx

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  • Blog

    Making Potting Mix

    by Jason Wiskerchen

    Monday, April 16, 2012, 5:17 PM

    0

    With spring upon us and the warming of the earth, many readers are getting the urge and itch to get outside and start planting a garden. Whether your garden is large enough to feed a community or just big enough to supplement your everyday fresh greens addiction, at some point you will need a supply of potting soil. From container herb gardens to the square-foot garden method, potting soil will need to be on hand. High-quality potting soil is an essential component to a successful garden season because it provides the foundational medium in which your plants will start and continue to grow in. In this article I discuss the process and recipe that I have used for many years for making great potting soil.  I hope to provide you with ideas on how to make the best mix for your garden and ways to save money in the future. 

    The Recipe

    The following is an excellent general seed starting mix and transplant mix.  For plants that might require a lighter mix, use a 2-1-1 ratio of the following ingredients.

    Mix the following ingredients together in a sealable bag or container to maintain moisture if potting mix is to be stored for any length of time.

    • 3 parts Peat Moss
    • 1 part Compost (can be a combo of compost and worm castings if you have a worm bin available)
    • 1 part Perlite

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  • Blog

    Extending the Harvest in Your Home Garden

    by Tom Page

    Tuesday, January 25, 2011, 11:05 PM

    0

    One way to improve resiliency as well as quality of life is to grow your own vegetables locally. However, gardeners in northern climates are especially challenged by limited growing seasons. In this brief article I will show examples of how to easily extend and preserve the harvest and have fun doing it.

    Why Extend Your Harvest?

    Presently we can drive to the supermarket to get nearly anything we want even in winter. The fresh fruits and vegetables we see have often been grown thousands of miles away in a tropical climate and flown in using a lot of energy may not be so cheap or plentiful in the future. As well as potentially reducing dependence on energy, extending the harvest of your own foods has advantages including:

    • Less work and simpler than preserving by canning or freezing
    • Fresher, higher quality than canned
    • Less expensive than supermarket
    • Increased resiliency with the option to of a local food source
    • Controlling your own food sources is more pleasurable and rewarding

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  • What Should I Do?
    Cold Frame in the snow - Woodman

    Extending the Harvest in Your Home Garden

    Grow year-round with these simple methods
    by Tom Page

    Tuesday, January 25, 2011, 11:05 PM

    9

    One way to improve resiliency as well as quality of life is to grow your own vegetables locally. However, gardeners in northern climates are especially challenged by limited growing seasons. In this brief article I will show examples of how to easily extend and preserve the harvest and have fun doing it.

    Why Extend Your Harvest?

    Presently we can drive to the supermarket to get nearly anything we want even in winter. The fresh fruits and vegetables we see have often been grown thousands of miles away in a tropical climate and flown in using a lot of energy may not be so cheap or plentiful in the future. As well as potentially reducing dependence on energy, extending the harvest of your own foods has advantages including:

    • Less work and simpler than preserving by canning or freezing
    • Fresher, higher quality than canned
    • Less expensive than supermarket
    • Increased resiliency with the option to of a local food source
    • Controlling your own food sources is more pleasurable and rewarding

     

    Read More »

  • Blog

    The Essential Gardening and Food Resilience Library

    by Old Hippie

    Monday, November 22, 2010, 4:17 AM

    0

    Under the general topic of growing some (or all) of our own food, we have broken the larger topic down into several knowledge areas.  We think you should understand why growing your own food is a good choice to make, and so “Understand It” is our first general topic.  Following that, “Grow It,” “Save It,” and “Use It” will help you think about the critical topics of how to get food into the ground, how to get it out, how to keep it from spoiling, and what to do with it once you’ve got it on the shelf, in the freezer, or in the root cellar.  Introductory notes in each section will help you choose which books, publications or websites to read first.  We’ve included links in the text, so you can click for more information as you read. Some of the material that follows is fairly basic; other material is more advanced.

    Don’t let something supposedly “advanced” keep you away.  Everyone has to start at the beginning.  We all did.  Whether you choose to grow food against possible shortages, or as an economic decision or as part of changing your lifestyle in healthy and rewarding ways, we hope you find this annotated bibliography of the books that have helped us will help you as well.  We’ve included full citations for each book, to help you locate them.

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  • Blog

    Daily Digest – June 15

    by Davos

    Monday, June 15, 2009, 3:58 PM

    0
    • Historic Bond Market CRASH Underway…
    • FSN Part 3A and 3 B June 13, 2009 Real, WinAmp, Windows, Mp3
    • * * * * ABBY NORMAL (Repost)
    • Inside Look – Investor Psychology (Video)
    • How to fix Financial Television
    • Hotel RevPAR off 22.9 Percent
    • Fed: Household Net Worth Off $14 Trillion
    • Retail Sales in May: Off 10.8% from May 2008
    • Roubini’s RGE Monitor: Threat of ‘Asia-Style Crisis’ in Eastern Europe
    • Update: What is a Depression?
    • U.S. Treasury Receipts: Off 18% (fiscal) YTD
    • New Tomato Plants In Old Milk Jugs: Planting Tomatoes Upside Down (Video)
    • Solar Towers Could Power the Future: Solar Updraft Power Plants
    • UPDATE: Bernanke is worried! HR 1207 to Audit the Federal Reserve is Gaining Momentum FAST!

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  • Blog

    Martenson Report Ready – Food Outlook 2009

    by Chris Martenson

    Monday, May 25, 2009, 3:20 PM

    0

    Hello and Happy Memorial Day!

    There’s a new Martenson Report ready for enrolled members.  It can be accessed by clicking the title below, or going to the Martenson Report page.  As always, it has already been sent as a newsletter so you should also find it in your inbox.

    Here’s a snippet:

    Food Outlook 2009 – Understanding the Risks

    Executive Summary

    • Global grain stocks at lowest levels in over four decades
    • Shockingly low fertilizer sales suggest possibility of a disappointing yield
    • Food supply and demand are tightly balanced
    • Food distribution networks are cost-efficient but not terribly robust
    • Ways you can increase your food security

    Introduction

    Food is something that many of us take for granted, but it is important to recognize that this luxury is a recent development in human history. It is time to give more thought to this critical staple in our lives.

    In March of 2008, food commodity prices hit an all-time high. This coincided with a world-wide food crisis, food riots, and even a few instances of national rice hoarding. Many believe that this was triggered by economic conditions (e.g. a flood of cheap money), not a fundamental or structural shortfall in food production. But I hold the view that both were at fault.

    Food demand has grown steadily over the years, as has food supply. However, in recent years the excess margin of supply over demand has tightened and even gone negative several times. Reserve stocks are incredibly tight, resting at levels not seen since the early 1970’s. 

    It is easily conceivable that food deliveries could be disrupted within any country, leading to rapid onset of local food shortages. This report will apprise you of several of the challenges that currently exist regarding world food supplies and the possibility that these challenges could lead to a structural shortfall in global food supplies in 2009 or 2010. It also contains specific actions that could greatly enhance your own food security.

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