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Tag Archives: demographics

  • Daily Digest
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    Daily Digest 8/5 – Record “Red Tide” Killing Wildlife In Florida, The Distribution Of Pain

    by DailyDigest

    Sunday, August 5, 2018, 4:12 PM

    4
    • Why companies flush with tax-cut cash are spending more on share buybacks than wage hikes
    • Coffins destroyed in China in search of solution to burying 9 million bodies a year
    • Trump Welcomes Immigrants, But Only If They Can Be Exploited
    • Senators introduce bill to slap 'crushing' new sanctions on Russia
    • Russian authorities prepare to soften plan to raise retirement age, sources say
    • Job growth has never lasted this long before. Neither has weak wage growth.
    • All Good Gadgets Go to Waste
    • Drug giant Glaxo teams up with DNA testing company 23andMe
    • Stonehenge mystery solved, says breakthrough scientific study
    • Apple is worth $1 trillion. Here's what that much money could actually do.
    • The Distribution of Pain, Redux
    • NOAA plans ‘outside the box’ response to save a starving Puget Sound orca
    • Meteor Explodes with 2.1 Kilotons of Force 25 Miles Above US Air Force Base in Greenland
    • Climate Change and the Next US Revolution
    • Record 'Red Tide' Of Toxic Algae Is Killing Wildlife In Florida
    • Everyday Plastics Found To Emit Greenhouse Gas Pollution As They Degrade

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  • Podcast

    Harry Dent: Stocks Will Fall 70-90% Within 3 Years

    Creating the buying opportunity of a lifetime
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, January 30, 2017, 5:02 PM

    56

    Economist and cycle trend forecaster Harry Dent sees crushing deflation ahead for nearly every financial asset class. We are at the nexus of a concurrent series of downtrends in the four most important predictive trends he tracks.

    Laying out the thesis of his new book The Sale Of A Lifetime, Dent sees punishing losses ahead for investors who do not position themselves for safety beforehand. On the positive side, he predicts those that do will have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to buy assets at incredible bargain prices once the carnage ends (and yes, for those of you wondering, he also addresses his outlook for gold).

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  • Insider
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    Off The Cuff: The Driverless Future

    It's going to have a HUGE impact, especially on jobs
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, October 28, 2016, 1:36 AM

    15

    In this week's Off The Cuff podcast, Chris and Mish Shedlock discuss:

    • Meaningless Metrics
      • Offical data is so 'fuzzy' as to be useless now
    • AT&T/Time Warner merger & Snapchat IPO
      • Signs of excess seen at a bubble top
    • The Driverless Future
      • It's going to have a HUGE impact, especially on jobs
    • The Demographic Time Bomb
      • Pensions will start blowing up left & right

    Click to listen to a sample of this Off the Cuff Podcast or Enroll today to access the full audio and other premium content today.

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  • Blog
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    Which Countries Will Be Tomorrow’s Winners & Losers?

    Resources, capital flows & demographics will be key
    by charleshughsmith

    Saturday, May 14, 2016, 12:23 AM

    11

    The dictum “demographics is destiny” proposes that all the complexities of finance, society and politics are ultimately guided by demographics: the relative size of each generation, birth rates, death rates, etc.

    Where does this lead? If geography and demographics have already defined which nations will be attractive to capital and most likely to accumulate productive capital in their domestic economy, and those nations that will struggle due to high costs and low rates of capital investment, in effect Nature (geography) and Culture (demographics) have already picked tomorrow’s winners and losers.

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  • Insider
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    And The Winner Is…

    Which nations to keep your investments in
    by charleshughsmith

    Saturday, May 14, 2016, 12:20 AM

    19

    Executive Summary

    • The Sole Superpower
    • The Importance of factoring in External Costs
    • The Biggest Loser
    • Which nations to keep your investments in

    If you have not yet read Which Countries Will Be Tomorrow's Winners & Losers?, available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

    In Part 1, we examined the thesis that geography and demographics largely define a nation’s destiny.

    In Part 2 here, we add other potentially game-changing factors that don’t necessarily fit neatly into either category.

    Oh, No: America, The Sole Superpower?

    Many of those who disagree with America’s military-interventionist foreign policy of the past 15 years will naturally be appalled by any analysis that suggests America’s preeminence is only going to become even more dominant as the rest of the world is destabilized by the inter-connected dynamics driving global disorder.

    The good news is Zeihan sees America becoming much less interventionist as it withdraws into greater self-sufficiency—a topic I’ve discussed in previous essays on autarky. (What If Nations Were Less Dependent on One Another? The Case for Autarky (January 2014))

    In Zeihan’s view, America’s preeminence is based on its unparalleled assets of geography and more favorable demographics than its competitors. Zeihan sees the U.S.A’s energy resources, dual-ocean buffers, lack of contiguous-border competitors/enemies, culture of innovation and impressive pool of domestic and foreign capital as an unbeatable combination that no other aspirant to superpower status can match.

    In his analysis, the intrinsic weaknesses of other nations and alliances such as the Eurozone have been papered over by the flood of capital that has saturated the global economy for the past 20 years.  The source of this ocean of capital is….

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  • Podcast

    Neil Howe: What To Expect From The Fourth Turning We’re Now In

    More centralized control, crisis & conflict
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, March 15, 2015, 4:58 PM

    48

    Fourth turnings are characterized by a growing demand for social order, yet supply of it remains weak. The emergence of the surveillance state, a perpetual war machine, increased intervention in the markets by the central planners, greater government control of critical systems like health care and the Internet — all of these are classic signs that we are well into a fourth turning now.

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  • Blog
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    Future Shock – Crash Course Chapter 25

    The unsustainable often ends abruptly
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, December 27, 2014, 3:24 AM

    23

    Chapter 25 of the Crash Course is now publicly available and ready for watching below.

    Here at the penultimate chapter of The Crash Course, everything we've learned comes together into a single narrow range of time we'll call the twenty-teens. 

    What this chapter offers is a comprehensive view of how all of our problems are actually interrelated and need to be viewed as such, or solutions will continue to elude us.

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  • Blog
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    Demographics – Crash Course Chapter 15

    Age distribution is too lopsided to support entitlements
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, September 26, 2014, 10:21 PM

    12

    Our national demographic architecture no longer can afford the entitlement system we have. And that's even assuming entitlements were currently sufficiently funded. But as the last chapter showed, the existing programs are underfunded to the tune of $100-200 Trillion. 

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  • Blog
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    Ready Or Not…

    The unsustainable status quo is ending
    by Chris Martenson

    Thursday, September 25, 2014, 8:00 PM

    45

    If risk has been taken from where it belongs and instead shuffled onto central bank balance sheets, or allowed to be hidden by new and accommodating accounting tricks, has it really disappeared? In my world, risk is like energy: it can neither be created nor destroyed, only transformed or transferred. 

    If reality no longer has a place at the table — such as when policy makers act as if the all-too-temporary shale oil bonanza is now a new permanent constant — then the discussions happening around that table are only accidentally useful, if ever, and always delusional.

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  • Insider

    We’re All Turning Japanese

    Japan is the proxy for our future
    by Gregor Macdonald

    Tuesday, September 10, 2013, 5:40 PM

    28

    Executive Summary

    • As goes Japan's efforts to rescue it's economy, so will go the U.S. and E.U.
    • Japan's options:
      • Outsource its manufacturing base
      • Replace as much human labor with automation as it can
      • Rush to trade its depreciating currency for hard assets around the world
    • What Japan is telling us about the Keynesian endpoint

    If you have not yet read Part I: Abenomics' Dismal Anniversary, available free to all readers, please click here to read it first.

    Japan Is Reflecting the Future of Western Economies

    While many observers continue to follow Europe as the proxy for post-growth dynamics in the OECD, it's actually Japan that merits the closest analysis.

    Much farther along in its post-growth phase, bloated with government debt and having tried a number of big-bang initiatives over the decades, Japan not the U.S. or Europe is leading the way. The country has never really recovered from the gigantic property and stock bubble over twenty years ago.

    As proof, just consider the biggest trading story of the past 12 months. Was it the Federal Reserve's intention to taper? How about the chaos in emerging market currencies in countries like India and Indonesia? Or perhaps the continued economic depression in peripheral Europe, as countries like Spain, Portugal, and Greece re-run the 1930s, with mass unemployment and people burning wood from forests to say warm? No, not even such dramatic suffering in Europe was enough to move markets or the EUR currency much this past year.

    Instead, it was Abenomics and the front-running (and then chasing) of wildly huge moves in both the Nikkei and JPY that helped drive liquidity and speculative juices across all markets. It is not a coincidence that the peak of this frenzy in May heralded the peak in many markets.

    But Japan has more than a financial problem. Despite the hand-wringing about Japan's debt, the world has ignored for some time now Japan's debt-to-GDP, GDP on an absolute basis, and Japan's low cost of capital. Japan borrows. Japan prints. Japan devalues. But the world doesn't care.

    An issue the world may finally begin to care about, however, is that Japan has failed to launch itself out of deflation and is making very little progress in its struggle now. Indeed, Japan has a demographics problem and a resources problem that far outweigh its financial problems. To this point, instead of launching into recovery, Japan is running with the resources Red Queen, as every step of its currency devaluation is met with rising costs to import the raw materials Japan uses to make its goods…

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