Tag Archives: CPI

  • Blog
    Dreamstime

    Mad As Hell

    Why the public is so pissed off
    by Chris Martenson

    Saturday, January 14, 2017, 3:50 AM

    63

    A critical movement is arising at this time in history.

    Each of us can assume a role to play in its formation and development, and therefore its eventual success or failure. It's my personal belief that we are past the time where we can avoid major disruption, so each of us must be personally prepared as best we can for upheaval, while also working towards building a new and better narrative to live by.

    Do you have the courage to participate?

    Read More »

  • Podcast

    Bill Fleckenstein: Hold Tight To Your Gold

    Why it's going to go "one hell of a lot" higher
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, April 21, 2013, 4:35 PM

    6

     

    The bond market is an accident waiting to happen.
     

    When the bond market finally does crack, it is going to be one epic nightmare that is going to make 2008 and 2009 seem like a picnic. It will be a different kind of a crisis; but it will be an enormous crisis. These people that are bullish about stocks and bonds and the bond market, they do not understand anything.

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  • Blog
    © Skypixel | Dreamstime.com

    Let’s Stop Fooling Ourselves: Americans Can’t Afford the Future

    Unemployment, taxes & unfunded retirements are squeezing us
    by Adam Taggart

    Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 3:24 PM

    61

    The truth is: The three adult generations in the U.S. are suffering, and their burdens are likely to increase with time. Each is experiencing a squeeze that is making it harder to create value, save capital, and pursue happiness than at any point since WWII. At that point, we were a creditor nation with an economy exploding into dominance on the world stage. Now, however, the U.S. is the largest debtor nation and our economic hegemony is increasingly at seige across a number of fronts.

    A continuation of the status quo is a decision to sleepwalk face-first into the constraints hurtling towards us.

    Instead, shouldn't we stop fooling ourselves and ask: What should we be doing differently?

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  • Blog
    © Oleg Gekman | Dreamstime.com

    What Data Can We Trust?

    How can we make decisions in a world of flawed information?
    by charleshughsmith

    Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 5:33 AM

    4

    Modern investing offers the promise that investors who "do their homework" and use data more intelligently than the herd can gain a valuable edge. But what if the underlying data available to the investing public is fundamentally flawed? 

    The federal government agencies that issue headline data and the mainstream media that reprints the data without skeptical analysis would have us believe that these indicators — the unemployment rate and the consumer price index (CPI), for example — accurately reflect economic realities.

    The other indicator that is implicitly or explicitly assumed to reflect the economy’s health is, of course, the stock market, generally represented by the S&P 500 index.

    That the government indicators and the stock market are both suspect is now a given.

     

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  • Blog

    Obama’s Budget is a Fantastic Comedy

    by Chris Martenson

    Tuesday, February 15, 2011, 3:34 AM

    0

    Fantasy or comedy?  I couldn’t decide which way to label the Obama budget, so I went with both.

    The bottom line is that the Obama administration has brought forth the most unbelievable revenue increase that I have ever seen proposed in a budget, a whopping 65% increase in revenues in just four years, which will – miracle of miracles – drop the deficit as a percent of GDP from nearly 11% to just 3.2% over those same four years.

    The only problem with this scenario is that it stands virtually no chance of actually happening. Revenue will be far lower than projected and the deficit correspondingly higher.

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  • Blog

    Inflation Is So Much Worse Than We’re Told

    by Chris Martenson

    Tuesday, January 25, 2011, 3:00 PM

    0

    Inflation is actually much higher than what the BLS claims it is; something that purchasers of college tuition, pharmaceuticals, or health insurance know all too well.

    To give the BLS some credit, they must try and estimate a single rate of inflation that applies to everyone equally.  But that is a completely impossible task. An octogenarian living in Seattle on a meager pension and taking lots of prescription medications will have a totally different inflation experience than an 18 year old living in their parent’s basement eating Ramen noodles. 

    But even after spotting the BLS some slack, there are some enormous and glaring errors in their methods that render the official inflation measure hopelessly – and dangerously – inaccurate. 

    In this article, I am going to reveal how US inflation numbers are badly understated, how this practice short-changes institutions and fixed-income individuals alike, and why this means fiscal and inflationary train-wrecks are the most probable outcome for the US — and, by extension, the globe.

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  • Blog

    Don’t Be Fooled: Inflation Has The Upper Hand

    by Chris Martenson

    Wednesday, December 8, 2010, 10:23 PM

    0

    Here at Martenson Central, we are endlessly keeping a close eye out for the emergence of deflation, defined here as the purchasing power of the dollar going up. 

    Technically, inflation and deflation are terms that indicate a particular combination of money surplus or deficit (respectively), demand for money (of which velocity is but one measure), and demand for various goods and services (which themselves may be in abundance or short supply).

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  • Blog

    Straight Talk with Mike Shedlock (aka “Mish”)

    by Adam Taggart

    Wednesday, October 27, 2010, 4:16 AM

    0

    Today marks the launch of our new and (hopefully) regularly recurring “Straight Talk” series, featuring thinking from notable minds the ChrisMartenson.com audience has indicated it wants to learn more about. Readers submit the questions they want addressed and our guests take their best crack at answering. Our hopes are high you’ll enjoy the expert insights and alternative perspectives this new series brings. 

    Our inaugural Straight Talk contributor is Mike Shedlock, author of Mish’s Global Economic Trend Analysis, one of the most visited and respected economic blogs on the Web. Mish is an outspoken deflationist and outlines his rationale for being so in his answers to our questions. He is also a registered investment advisor representative for SitkaPacific Capital Management. 


    1. You’ve gone from mainframe computer programming analyst (in 2005) to being one of the most widely-read econobloggers in the world today. To what extent do you attribute your competitive advantage to holding a non-traditional background vs. the more ‘classically’ trained analysts and commentators?

    Mish: It certainly helps not having a background in economics as taught by academia today. Nearly everyone in academia is a Keynesian or Monetarist.

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  • Blog

    Martenson Report – Inflation vs. Deflation – What Comes Next?

    by Chris Martenson

    Sunday, June 14, 2009, 8:24 PM

    0

    There’s a new Martenson Report ready for enrolled members.

    Link to:  Inflation vs. Deflation – What Comes Next?

    Here’s a snippet:

    One of the key questions of our day, especially for those who have wealth to protect, is, “What’s going to happen to the dollar?”  More specifically, do we foresee an increase in the value of money going forward (deflation), or a decrease in the value of money (inflation)? Should we reserve a small amount of concern for the possibility of hyperinflation, which means the rapid and often total destruction of a currency?

    There happens to be a lot of discussion around this topic these days. Unfortunately, much of it is confusing and contradictory, because far too much misinformation is included in the mix. So let’s begin by getting ourselves on firm footing before we look at the data.

    (…)

    Inflation correlates poorly with growth in the monetary base, making that statistic relatively useless as a predictor of inflation. However, inflation correlates extremely well with growth in government spending, meaning that we’d do well to track that statistic closely.

    The current economic crisis is being fought tooth and nail by a determined Federal Reserve (in the role of the "enabler") and an equally-determined US government (in the role of the heavy-lifter, assuming all the lion’s share of the long-term debt and risk). Together, these institutions have virtually consigned future generations to the enormous challenge of wrestling with bloated budgets in desperate need of trimming, further compounded by coinciding with periods of high inflation.

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  • Blog

    Daily Digest – Apr 17

    by Davos

    Friday, April 17, 2009, 2:52 PM

    0
    • Treasury Department Issues Emergency Recall Of All US Dollars (Video, Humor, H/T JKibbe)
    • Behind the Curtain 4/9/09
    • CPI Down; Solely Due to Transportation
    • February Monthly TIC Flows Negative Again…
    • Bank Stress Tests, Explained (Video)
    • Is Recovery Just Around the Corner?
    • RPT-FEATURE-Politicians also to blame for crisis, say bankers
    • General Growth Files Biggest U.S. Property Bankruptcy
    • Stage 3 Tsunami Building up Again. SB 1137 Delay and Toxic Mortgages
    • A Good — er, Bad — Connection
    • Tarp-o-Meter, Keeping track of who’s paying back
    • The End of Final-Salary Pensions?
    • Central Banker Fun & Games…
    • Swiss citizens think a large Swiss bank will fail
    • Read More »