Tag Archives: collateral

  • Blog
    © Sai Yeung Chan | Dreamstime.com

    Get Ready for Rising Commodity Prices

    Driven by hot money seeking a low-risk haven
    by charleshughsmith

    Wednesday, July 17, 2013, 1:27 AM

    13

    The human mind seeks a narrative explanation of events, a story that makes sense of the swirl of life’s interactions.

    The simpler the story, the easier it is to understand. Thus the simple stories are the most attractive to us.

    But conspiracies and power groups do not always provide comprehensive explanations for what we observe.

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  • Blog
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    Say Goodbye to the Purchasing Power of the Dollar

    Mr. Bernanke goes to Crazytown
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, March 25, 2013, 3:29 AM

    108

    On a long solo car trip this past weekend, I downloaded several podcasts to listen to as the miles passed. One was a classic: The Invention of Money, originally released by NPR's Planet Money team back in January of 2011. I highly recommend listening (or re-listening) to it in full.

    The podcast is a great reminder of how any currency in a monetary system is a fabricated construct. A simpler way to explain this is to say it has value simply because we believe it does.

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  • Blog
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    The Unsafe Foundation of Our Housing ‘Recovery’

    Overdependence on subsidies, debt, and unfounded optimism
    by charleshughsmith

    Monday, February 25, 2013, 9:55 PM

    6

    What could go wrong with the housing 'recovery' in 2013?

    To answer this question, we need to understand that housing is the key component in household wealth. And, that Central Planning policies are aimed at creating a resurgent “wealth effect,” as follows: When people perceive their wealth as rising, they tend to borrow and spend more freely. This is a major goal of U.S. Central Planning.

    Another key goal of Central Planning is to strengthen the balance sheets of banks and households. And the broadest way to accomplish this is to boost the value of housing. This then adds collateral to banks holding mortgages and increases the equity of homeowners.

    Some analysts have noted that housing construction and renovation has declined to a modest percentage of the gross domestic product (GDP). This perspective understates the importance of the family house as the largest asset for most households and housing’s critical role as collateral in the banking system.

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  • Blog

    Straight Talk with Tyler Durden: The U.S. Is Free-Falling Into Bankruptcy

    by Adam Taggart

    Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 2:46 PM

    0

    “Straight Talk” features thinking from notable minds that the ChrisMartenson.com audience has indicated it wants to learn more about.  Readers submit the questions they want addressed and our guests take their best crack at answering. The comments and opinions expressed by our guests are their own.

    This week’s Straight Talk contributor is Tyler Durden, founder and chief demagogue of the popular econoblog Zero Hedge. Zero Hedge’s mission is to bring back a more critical, rigorous, and informed style of commentary and synthesis for the professional investing public. The blog has experienced explosive growth in it’s two-year existence, due in part to its prolific coverage of financial events as well as its unapologetic (some say controversial) editorial approach, which is often highly critical of today’s economic and political leaders.


     

    1. What led you to start Zero Hedge? Was there a particular story or moment? For many of our readers, you have become the CNN of the Great Collapse (this is seen as a positive thing). Is this what you set out to be?

    Zero Hedge was started two years ago in the aftermath of the Great Financial Crash, as coined by Bill Buckler, when we realized there is a substantial vacuum in information distribution, and to a lesser extent, processing. The financial media world was (and to a great extent still is) dominated by journalists who were learning finance on the job and thus were incapable of putting the dots together on most stories under investigation.

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