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Tag Archives: Carbon Dioxide

  • Podcast

    Connor Stedman: Carbon Farming

    Sequestering atmospheric carbon through natural means
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, October 9, 2017, 9:10 PM

    15

    Climate change remains a hotly debated topic. But a scientific fact not up for dispute is the pronounced spike in the concentration of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere over the past two centuries.

    There's a building urgency to find solutions that can manage/reverse that spike — a process known as carbon sequestration. But how to do that on a planetary scale? It's a massive predicament. And most of the 'solutions' being proposed are technologically unproven, prohibitively costly and/or completely impractical.

    Enter carbon farming. It uses nature-based farming practices to park gigatons of carbon in the soil, rebuild soil health and complexity, and revitalize the nutrient density of the foods that we eat.

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  • Podcast

    Mark Cochrane: Climate Change, Revisited

    The latest on what science has to say
    by Adam Taggart

    Sunday, November 27, 2016, 9:27 PM

    97

    Mark Cochrane, Professor and Senior Research Scientist at the Geospatial Science Center of Excellence at South Dakota State University, returns to the podcast after a year and a half to update us on what the latest science has to tell us on the (often controversial) topic of climate change.

    Mark has been researching the climate for over 20 years, and among his many other accomplishments, moderates what we believe to be the most level-headed, open-minded and data-centric discussion forum on climate change available on the Internet today.

    In this week's podcast, Mark updates us on the latest empirical data, separates out what science can and cannot prove today regarding climate change, and provides clarity into closely-related but less well-understood issues, such as ocean acidification.

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  • Blog

    The Environment: Increasing Waste – Crash Course Chapter 24

    We are killing the ecosystems we depend on
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, December 5, 2014, 11:54 PM

    12

    Following up on the previous chapter focusing on human-caused resource depletion, the other disheartening part of the story of the environment concerns the things we humans put back into it, and the impact they have on the ecosystems that support all of life — ours included.

    Like the economy, ecosystems are complex systems.  That means that they owe their complexity and order to energy flows and, most importantly, they are inherently unpredictable.  How they will respond to the change by a thousand rapid insults is unknown and literally unknowable.

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  • Blog

    Copenhagen & Economic Growth – You Can’t Have Both

    by Chris Martenson

    Thursday, December 24, 2009, 7:31 PM

    0

    Note:  This is most of a recent Martenson Report that I am making public after numerous requests to do so.  Normally I reserve such reports for at least several months before general release. I’ve only left off my conclusions about what this all implies about the future. One member from Germany (thank you Michael!) has translated this piece into German and that appears as a downloadable attachment at the bottom of the article.


    Preamble: I normally avoid writing on Global Warming/Climate Change as a topic for discussion because it tends to be a heated topic for many people on both sides, which can work against collaborative solutions. This article is not about global warming and/or the science behind it, and it is not my intention to discuss those ideas here.



    I want to point out that a massive discrepancy exists between the official pronouncements emerging from Copenhagen on carbon emissions and recent government actions to spur economic growth.

    Before and during Copenhagen (and after, too, we can be sure), politicians and central bankers across the globe have worked tirelessly to return the global economy to a path of growth.  We need more jobs, we are told; we need economic growth, we need more people consuming more things.  Growth is the ever-constant word on politicians’ lips.  Official actions amounting to tens of trillions of dollars speak to the fact that this is, in fact, our number-one global priority.

    But the consensus coming out of Copenhagen is that carbon emissions have to be reduced by a vast amount over the next few decades. 

    These two ideas are mutually exclusive.  You can’t have both.

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