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Tag Archives: assets

  • Podcast

    Doug Noland: There Will Be No Way Out When This Market Bubble Bursts

    Financial assets will become toxic to hold
    by Adam Taggart

    Monday, December 11, 2017, 7:07 PM

    10

    This week Doug Noland joins the podcast to discuss what he refers to as the "granddaddy of all bubbles".

    He certainly shares our views that prices in nearly every financial asset class have become remarkably distorted due to central bank intervention, first with Greenspan's actions to backstop the markets in the late-1980's, and more recently (and more egregiously) with the combined central banking cartel's massive and sustained liquidity injections in the years following the Great Financial Crisis.

    All of which has blown the biggest inter-connected set of asset price bubbles the world has ever seen. Noland foresees tremendous losses as inevitable, as the central banks lose control of the monstrosity they have created:

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  • Blog
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    What Could Pop The Everything Bubble?

    A crisis that can't be solved by just printing more dollars
    by Peak Prosperity Admin

    Saturday, October 28, 2017, 12:37 PM

    0

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  • Blog
    Shutterstock

    What Could Pop The Everything Bubble?

    A crisis that can't be solved by just printing more dollars
    by charleshughsmith

    Saturday, October 28, 2017, 5:37 AM

    10

    The policy of creating trillions in new currency and buying trillions in assets has inflated an 'Everything' Bubble — a bubble in all the asset classes being supported or purchased by central banks and their proxies.

    Many observers wonder: What, if anything, can pop this?

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  • Blog
    Zacarias Pereira da Mata/Shutterstock

    The Great Market Tide Has Now Shifted To Risk-Off Assets

    A global sea-change in risk appetite & sentiment
    by charleshughsmith

    Friday, July 8, 2016, 7:03 PM

    5

    In the conventional investment perspective, risk-on assets (i.e. investments with higher risks and higher potential returns) such as stocks are on a see-saw with risk-off assets (investments with lower returns and lower risk, such as Treasury bonds). When risk appetites are high, institutional managers and speculators move money into stocks and high-yield junk bonds, and move money out of safe-haven assets such as gold and U.S. Treasuries.

    But recently, markets are no longer following this convention. Safe haven assets such as precious metals and Treasuries are soaring at the same time that stock markets bounced strongly off the post-Brexit lows.

    Risk-on assets (stocks) rising at the same time as safe-haven assets is akin to dogs marrying cats and living happily ever after. 

    What the heck is going on?

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  • Blog
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    Future Shock – Crash Course Chapter 25

    The unsustainable often ends abruptly
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, December 27, 2014, 3:24 AM

    23

    Chapter 25 of the Crash Course is now publicly available and ready for watching below.

    Here at the penultimate chapter of The Crash Course, everything we've learned comes together into a single narrow range of time we'll call the twenty-teens. 

    What this chapter offers is a comprehensive view of how all of our problems are actually interrelated and need to be viewed as such, or solutions will continue to elude us.

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  • Podcast

    Mike Maloney: The Coming Wealth Transfer

    There's nowhere to hide (except in hard assets)
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, December 6, 2014, 8:34 PM

    43

    History may not repeat but it sure does rhyme. Mike Maloney has studied monetary and financial breakdowns  throughout history and concludes that there's nothing new or different happening this time, except its global and far more massive than any other time in history.

    Worse, there are echoes of 1911 where a series of diplomatic blunders and national pride and intransigence combined to create the still largely inexplicable start to WW I.  

    Chris Martenson: Well it’s global this time, right? This is — there’s nowhere to hide. (…)  What has happened when we’ve tried to print our way to prosperity before? What has happen? Why has it happened and what have been the consequences always been?

    Mike Maloney: Whenever you try to print your way to prosperity it transfers well from the masses to the few. The few being the people running the game and then also the hucksters that are very nimble, the con artists and so on. You see these people get rich during the Weimar Hyperinflation. There were quite a few of these fancy salespeople that got rich; they didn’t stay rich once things stabilized again.

    But it creates such a topsy turvy world that the normal person that does not know how to operate under these weird economic conditions cannot possibly keep up with things and wealth is transferred away from those people to the people that are very good at observing what’s going on that second and adjusting to it. But the one thing that I see as a constant throughout history is that gold and silver eventually do an accounting of all this — the financial — you know financial finessing that the governments are doing.

    And when it does that it — there is a transfer of wealth to the people that own gold and silver. And so — it’s very rare moments in history. This does not happen often. But it’s a great opportunity and I’ve just — you know if you look at gold right now the public’s opinion of gold is quite low because it’s been going down for three years.

    But if you look at it in a longer timeframe and I started investing in gold in 2002 and by early 2003 I started investing in silver and if you look at it from the year 2000 it’s still the best performing of the assets. It’s still out performed the Dow and S&P and real estate.

    And I will continue, myself, to accumulate on the way down I see this as an opportunity. And if it goes lower than it is right now, you know nobody has a perfect crystal ball. So it may have already put in its lows. But I just accumulate every single month and I will continue doing that because I see that as the only sure thing in this crazy world of currency creation.

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  • Insider
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    Off the Cuff: The Shift From Paper Assets To Real Ones Is On

    At least, among the top 1%
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, November 21, 2014, 2:29 AM

    9

    In this week's Off the Cuff podcast, Chris and John Rubino discuss:

    • Mass-delusional Markets
      • Investors are mistaking the destruction of our fiat system as prosperity
    • The Shift From Paper To Real Assets Is On
      • At least, among the top 1%
    • Generational War
      • Coming to a stagnating economy near you
    • It All Comes Back To Energy
      • And there's still no magic bullet in sight
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  • Blog
    Peak Prosperity

    A National Failure to Save & Invest – Crash Course Chapter 16

    Compounding the challenge of Too Much Debt
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, October 3, 2014, 11:08 PM

    5

    As detailed in earlier chapters, the US' debts and unfunded liabilities far exceed its assets. But making matters worse, the country is suffering from a prolonged failure to save and invest — both at the personal and national level.

    Being over-indebted and under-capitalized is a recipe for hardship as we move into the future, especially if economic growth is going to be harder to come by (which we forecast in the upcoming chapters on net energy). Each year we continue this deficit makes us less able to withstand systemic shocks (a 2008-style financial crisis, an energy shock, the outbreak of war), some number of which lie undoubtedly ahead at some point.

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  • Blog
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    Demographics – Crash Course Chapter 15

    Age distribution is too lopsided to support entitlements
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, September 26, 2014, 10:21 PM

    12

    Our national demographic architecture no longer can afford the entitlement system we have. And that's even assuming entitlements were currently sufficiently funded. But as the last chapter showed, the existing programs are underfunded to the tune of $100-200 Trillion. 

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  • Blog

    Assets & Liabilities – Crash Course Chapter 14

    Why the US is deeply insolvent
    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, September 20, 2014, 2:29 AM

    2

    Building on the previous chapter on the US' tremendous and exponentially-increasing debt, this chapter looks at the shocking shortfall between our nation's assets and its liabilities.

    In short, America is deeply insolvent. We're just not admitting it yet.

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