Tag Archives: aquifer

  • Blog
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    Ready Or Not…

    The unsustainable status quo is ending
    by Chris Martenson

    Thursday, September 25, 2014, 8:00 PM

    45

    If risk has been taken from where it belongs and instead shuffled onto central bank balance sheets, or allowed to be hidden by new and accommodating accounting tricks, has it really disappeared? In my world, risk is like energy: it can neither be created nor destroyed, only transformed or transferred. 

    If reality no longer has a place at the table — such as when policy makers act as if the all-too-temporary shale oil bonanza is now a new permanent constant — then the discussions happening around that table are only accidentally useful, if ever, and always delusional.

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  • Insider
    Chris Martenson/Martenson Garden July 2014

    Humans Making Bad Choices Is Why I Garden

    Behold, the era of Peak Soil
    by Chris Martenson

    Tuesday, July 22, 2014, 12:35 AM

    10

    As long as you're curious and read somewhat widely, if you're one of those readers who digs a bit further now and then, it's pretty much impossible to avoid the conclusion that humans are living unsustainably.

    We're using up energy sources that took approximately 350 million years to accrete in a single 350-year-long orgy of consumption.

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  • Blog

    Jack Keller: Understanding Peak Water

    by Adam Taggart

    Saturday, December 17, 2011, 3:17 AM

    0

    “A very, very large amount of our total food production is depending on a diminishing supply of water,” remarks Jack Keller, one of our own regulars here in the CM.com community and an accomplished world expert on water management.

    Similar to oil and other key natural resources that are mined and consumed, water is subject to the same exponential trends. Both surface supply and underground fossil stores of clean water are depleting at alarming rates, and the energy and economic costs of extraction are swiftly increasing.

    Water is our most precious natural resource (well, perhaps after oxygen). Advances in irrigation in the past century ushered in tremendous prosperity (the “green revolution”), particularly in food production, power generation, and a dramatic increase in the supportable populations for vast regions of land. If the water supply in future years dwindles to less than today’s, those societal gains are going to have to retreat to some extent.

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