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    Photo of person wearing shirt that reads creating a world worth inheriting, www.peakprosperity.com Peak Prosperity at Polyface

    Postcards from Polyface

    Help share the experience of an inspiring weekend with the tribe...
    by Whitney

    Monday, June 28, 2021, 7:58 PM

A phenomenal weekend with the tribe and Polyface friends

Many of us are just returning from an invigorating weekend of learning and camaraderie at Polyface Farm in Swoope, VA. Thanks to everyone who was a part of it!

The core Peak team is feeling totally energized and inspired by the experiments in resilience we’re all engaging in and sharing with each other.

Let’s keep the momentum going by pulling together some of our takeaways and reactions here.

Asks for those who attended

#1 – Share your favorite takeaway, learning, or moment in the comments below (publicly) or by emailing/private messaging us directly (privately to the PP team). What did you find most valuable or moving? What questions do you still have?
#2 – Choose a few of your favorite photos or video clips to share in the comments below! Please only share photos if you wouldn’t mind us using them on the site or for promotional purposes. Also note that this post and its comments are visible on the website.

What’s next?

If you couldn’t make it this time, don’t despair — you can still catch some of it!

Coming soon, look for a powerful, totally candid conversation between Chris and Joel that was recorded at the end of the visit!

And if you haven’t already, follow @peak.prosperity on Instagram to get more photos and videos as they roll in.

A taste of Polyface

Joel Salatin speaking to crowd

Joel gets us ready for the day with his signature playfulness

photo of two pigs by fence

A pair of happy, photogenic Polyface piglets

Mobile "Millennium Feathernet" with around 1,000 laying hens and attached feeder

Mobile “Millennium Feathernet” with around 1,000 laying hens and attached feeder

Photo of chicken processing line

Open-air chicken processing line

Pond with hoophouses and cows in background

Polyface vista – pond, hoop houses, and cows on the horizon

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34 Comments

  • Mon, Jun 28, 2021 - 8:21pm

    #1
    Cat

    Cat

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Feb 21 2020

    Posts: 35

    16

    An amazing event and community

    There were so many amazing moments, it's like an impossible challenge to pick one. Every time I turned around there was another fascinating conversation to be had. So many incredible thoughtful wise people, sharing a delightful educational experience with our inspiring hosts at polyface. I'm so glad I attended and shared the adventure together with so many of our tribe. Not only the organized events also the spontaneous conversations and side events that happened!

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  • Mon, Jun 28, 2021 - 8:44pm

    #2
    Matt Laherty

    Matt Laherty

    Status: Member

    Joined: Feb 07 2020

    Posts: 2

    11

    A few takeaways

    Joel’s woodmill.

    Breakfast on Saturday.

    Logs for milling

    Joel in the woodlot

    Part of lunch on Friday. The staff did an outstanding job cooking for the tribe. Thank you!

    Farm manager Eric and another staff member show off the cone of silence...

    Chris and Joel during the Q&A

    Key lines, access, water, small paddocks, keep’m moving, rotate.

    What a fantastic group of people!!!!!  Erica and I had a blast!!!!

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  • Mon, Jun 28, 2021 - 8:49pm

    #3

    Tycer

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Apr 26 2009

    Posts: 343

    7

    Tycer said:

    Audio Joel

    Joel is so much fun to listen to. I did not get the first part, but it is the Polyface mission statement : To develop environmentally, economically, and emotionally enhancing agricultural prototypes and facilitate their duplication throughout the world. 

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  • Mon, Jun 28, 2021 - 8:57pm

    #4
    2donks

    2donks

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jun 13 2009

    Posts: 25

    13

    Legacy aka A World Worth Inheriting

    It's a special place and was great to see it in person.  We probably should have toured a CAFO for comparison (oh, that's right you can't tour a CAFO, but Joel has a 24/7 open-farm policy, hmmm)

    I was impressed by the staff (mostly young people).  Their knowledge, skills, enthusiasm and confidence was inspirational.  It occurred to me that if Joel decided to sell the farm tomorrow and sit on the beach for the rest of his life, the network of people trained at Polyface and via his books would continue his practices at hundreds (thousands?) of farms.

    That's a pretty cool legacy and will likely influence my "next chapter" in my career.

    Chris

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  • Mon, Jun 28, 2021 - 9:04pm

    #5
    BBQ MD

    BBQ MD

    Status: Member

    Joined: Oct 08 2009

    Posts: 31

    11

    Fantastic Experience

    What a weekend!  It was a tremendous pleasure to meet so many of the PP tribe.  Nice to finally be able to associate faces with the names we see online.

    It was a lot of fun to meet so many folks of varying backgrounds and age groups.  Despite our differences, I think we all have an innate curiosity and ability to think in an "atypical" way.

    Joel Salatin has done something amazing in creating Polyface Farm; just as Chris Martenson did with Peak Prosperity, starting with the "Crash Course" so long ago.  I'm grateful for places like these where the realities of our current predicaments are openly discussed.  It's a refreshing contrast.

    Thanks for setting this up Chris and Crew!

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  • Mon, Jun 28, 2021 - 9:40pm

    #6

    Tycer

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Apr 26 2009

    Posts: 343

    12

    Chris’ crew are well hired.

    My greatest takeaway is Chris’ crew. What a team. I’m excited about the future of PeakProsperity.
    Joel is amazing. The eveready bunny couldn’t keep up.
    His apprenticeship program fiefdoms are genius.
    His way of raising cattle is carbon negative!
    I heard from an unnamed source that the 1.87% DWSNBN2 is purer than the 3mg pills my MD prescribed.  Just hearsay of course. I still say the pills are cut with mannitol. 😉

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  • Mon, Jun 28, 2021 - 10:37pm

    #7
    westcoastjan

    westcoastjan

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Jun 04 2012

    Posts: 636

    10

    Both happy and jealous

    Wished I was there! Looking at the pics, I see people who I would fit right in with and know that within moments together we would feel like kindred spirits. Down to earth, easy going people, comfortable in their own shoes, and who get it. That is the tribe 👍

    Glad you all had a great time and experience. One day.... I will be at a PP gathering!! [Barring Turdeau and team going full commie on us and doing the unspeakable....]

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  • Tue, Jun 29, 2021 - 8:33am

    #8

    travissidelinger

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Nov 17 2010

    Posts: 269

    8

    An Amazing Experience

    Thank you Chris, Joel, and crew for making this happened.  It was an amazing time.

    Next time we want to bring the kids if we can.

    Maybe some future suggestions:

    • Let's get break out sessions that people can sign up for.  I would even volunteer for a few tops.
    • What about camping on site?
    • Probably a stretch at this point, but what about a kids program eventually?
    • Instead of completely relaying on paid stave to run the place, let's take volunteers for directing traffic, clean up, food prep, and other stuff
    • Lets have an organized camp fire.  Do any of us have musical talents and wouldn't mind sharing?

    -Travis

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  • Tue, Jun 29, 2021 - 9:36am

    #9
    Dan Willis

    Dan Willis

    Status: Member

    Joined: Nov 04 2020

    Posts: 4

    23

    A moving experience...

    What a weekend! A heartfelt thank you to all of you involved in setting this up. My wife, Jamie, and I were just blown away. We learned so much!

    My favorite takeaway was actually something Joel mentioned about attitude and how he handles "the system" he is actively working to compete against. He carries an attitude of forgiveness towards the state, regulators, and others that might not quite understand what he is up to. That was profound. Personally, I have too much pent-up frustration and anger with "the way things are," and it can come through in being short when discussing our methods with folks that don't understand (we have yet to cross paths with any regulators). The entire weekend at Polyface was a reminder to me that I need to let that go; let go all of the pain, frustration, anger and everything else that can come with living in an upside down world. Everyone at Polyface had a heart of service and kindness, and it was rather emotional for me to see that at work.

    It reminded me of Matthew 7:16-20:

    "Ye shall know them by their fruits. Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?

    Even so every good tree bringeth forth good fruit; but a corrupt tree bringeth forth evil fruit.

    A good tree cannot bring forth evil fruit, neither can a corrupt tree bring forth good fruit.

    Every tree that bringeth not forth good fruit is hewn down, and cast into the fire.

    Wherefore by their fruits ye shall know them."

     

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  • Tue, Jun 29, 2021 - 11:30am

    #10
    hmcgov

    hmcgov

    Status: Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2010

    Posts: 6

    8

    Milestone Event

    This was a great way to spend two days, the breadth of knowledge we were given plus the depth of knowledge available within earshot was impressive to say the least. It helped me solidify my food production plans moving forward, and opened my eyes to some completely new ideas. I'm now checking out saw mills, something that wasn't really on my radar previously.

    I also appreciate seeing folks like Joel and Chris in person. Sometimes people can make good videos/content but are not as impressive in person. Not the case here, they're the real deal. I thought they were sincere, and clearly focused on making the world a better place.

    We need to step away from the computer screen more often, change requires action. If you want to know how to get from hatchery to plate running on sunlight and carbon, then visit Polyface. They have mastered the art of doing it (and teaching it).

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  • Tue, Jun 29, 2021 - 1:12pm

    #11

    Oliveoilguy

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Jun 29 2012

    Posts: 1161

    9

    Community Structure at Polyface

    I’m not 100% sure, but I think Joel structures his team by giving each apprentice or task leader some independence in running their particular sub specialty. And I gather that  there are financial incentives built in. Each presenter was very professional and knowledgeable. Entrepreneurialism and capitalism was shown to work effectively.

    I met many people and exchanged contact info and hope to develop lasting relationships.

    Although I could only be there on Friday due to family obligations, it was worth the full price of admission.

    Had a chuckle with the PP crew about the written Geert Vanden Bossche transcript which referred to Viral “shitting”. And mentioned to Chris how succinct the summary video was.

    All in all a great experience!

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  • Tue, Jun 29, 2021 - 3:50pm

    #12
    karenf

    karenf

    Status: Member

    Joined: Oct 02 2010

    Posts: 71

    11

    The shot in the arm I needed

    As opposed to the shot in the arm I don't need!  😉

    Loved meeting new people and hearing all the awesome conversations.  Glad Chis is back in the saddle and ready to roll.  I am ready for more!

    Karen

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  • Tue, Jun 29, 2021 - 4:53pm

    #13

    Snydeman

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Feb 06 2013

    Posts: 641

    6

    It was a great time with a fairly steep learning curve!

    I had much fun meeting (and re-meeting) other members of the PP tribe, and I learned a lot in just two days' time...information I'll need to revisit and re-learn before it will set. I took ample notes, but also noticed peers writing even better notes nearby. If anyone is willing, we should consider pooling our notes in one central location, to be accessed and seen by all, or at least all who attended. For my part, I'll be converting my notes to a Powerpoint format to help with the fact that my handwriting is horrid.

     

    Many thanks to Chris and his team, as well as Joel and his team, for putting this together. Joel's apprentice corps were motivated and knowledgeable, and they give me some hope for the future.

     

    I still think the model Joel has and the model Singing Frog Farms has would be a powerhouse duo, and I hope that some of the "offshoots" of both will at some point come together and combine their relative strengths to offset the holes in each. I know that I never would have taken the plunge to vegetarianism had farms like Joel's been around in ample supply in MD 22 years back, too.

     

    My only question is how many days straight did Chris and his whole team sleep afterwards...

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  • Wed, Jun 30, 2021 - 8:18am

    #14

    travissidelinger

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Nov 17 2010

    Posts: 269

    2

    The land ownership problem

    This is a big question I didn't get to ask at the conference.  What options do we have to solve the land ownership problems?

    Those problems being:

    • First, A young farmer wants to start a farm.  Land prices are crazy expensive.  Their only option is to take on very large amounts of debt, which means the bank needs those loan payments to start coming asap, which means they don't have time to regenerate the land first.  Their every action is under scrutiny to make profit.
    • Second, We aren't growing more land, but we are growing more people.  Which means lands prices will always keep going up.  It's great to work out all those mutual thief-ems, but the those owning the land are sitting on a huge investment that could sold in their later years.
    • Land management by committee doesn't work, as Joel discussed.

    Do we have a model where a farmer can own and live on the land, the land can never be sold for profit, and the land has to be regenerated/improved?

    -Travis

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  • Wed, Jun 30, 2021 - 10:04am

    grandefille

    grandefille

    Status: Member

    Joined: Oct 11 2010

    Posts: 52

    1

    Individual Incentives

    I didn't attend the weekend but have heard Joel speak at  farm conferences.  One session was about managing interns/employees.  I think it was in late 2018.  He gave an example of the delivery truck driver:  There were established customers with predictable purchases when the new driver was hired.  They were paid a fixed fee (I think hourly) for the route.  If they personally identified new customers or persuaded existing customers to buy new products, they got a comission.

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  • Wed, Jun 30, 2021 - 3:51pm

    #16
    Greg Hawkins

    Greg Hawkins

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jan 28 2009

    Posts: 22

    9

    Impactful and Informing Experience

    My favorite takeaway: The synergy of the whole experience including the staff, the program, the tribe, the place, the animals, and the farmer that pulled it all together + the talk between Chris & Joel.

    Questions I still have: (1) what happens when the feed they use is out of supply? (2) what happens when the hatchlings they are supplied with run out of supply? In other words, how can they do what they do and be 100% self sufficient if need be? I understand that the answer would affect the economics of their model, but I'm thinking worse case, if supply lines for items they depend on are shut down.

     

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  • Wed, Jun 30, 2021 - 3:54pm

    #17

    Snydeman

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Feb 06 2013

    Posts: 641

    4

    Snydeman said:

    Here are some of the shots I managed to get

    The combined rabbit breeder area and chicken coop. The chickens stir up the mulch of the floor, helping the rabbit excrement compost.

    Chicken Broiler

    One of the dozens of chicken broilers- designed to allow chickens outdoor time but be moved daily

    Chicken Broiler

    Movable chicken broiler

    PPers looking at one of the sheep grazing areas.

     

    Movable chicken house, designed to allow chickens to fertilize fields so grass grows for the cattle

    Joel’s lumber yard. He did a great job explaining how to better make money off of your homestead’s forested areas.

    The pigs were mostly free-range within movable “zones.” They definitely had unique personalities, based on what little I saw of each of them.

    The chick day-care center (not it’s formal name). Learned a LOT about figuring out what the chicks need by observing their behavior, rather than relying on tools or gauges.

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  • Wed, Jun 30, 2021 - 10:42pm

    SunFarmer

    SunFarmer

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Mar 07 2019

    Posts: 44

    1

    SunFarmer said:

    I missed it  🙁  Related & Good read . Polyface Farms in Virginia hosted a summit on June 18-19 on healing and living in the modern world disease-free with abundant energy, peace and joy.

    https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/06/ginny-garner/summit-on-healing-attracts-hundreds-to-polyface-farm-in-virginia/https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/06/ginny-garner/summit-on-healing-attracts-hundreds-to-polyface-farm-in-virginia/

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  • Thu, Jul 01, 2021 - 7:08am

    #19
    Chris Martenson

    Chris Martenson

    Status: Platinum Member

    Joined: Jun 07 2007

    Posts: 6037

    14

    Packed to the Gills But Too Brief!

    First, the highlight of this gathering for me, as always, was the amazing assemblage of people.  Both those in our PP tribe who were drawn to it, as well as the fine folks at Polyface.

    I truly love getting to meet people, and was really impacted by and inspired (to keep going) by the many people who expressed deep gratitude for the work I've done over the years and especially the Covid coverage.  At least a dozen stories emerged from people who had managed to get out of countries before the SHTF, who had helped loved ones avoid getting sick, or who had stocked up in time to avoid being part of the anxious crowds who got onto the story late.

    These moments help remind me of exactly why I do what I do.  Of course I know that on some level.  But the on-line model doesn't compare at all to hearing and receiving such connections in person.  There's no replacing all the subtle cues that come from person-to-person contact.

    Next, I was especially thrilled to have my new PP team there to meet everyone.  Two of them were old hands at PP gatherings while the other two had only heard about them.

    So now the whole team is on the same page; the PP tribe is simply an amazing collection of people.  Everyone on our side came away inspired to have more gatherings like this, of different sorts and flavors, and in strong agreement that events are a cornerstone of what we can do on our end to best serve this community.

    Lastly, the Polyface team and Joel really put on a show for us.  They obviously spent considerable time blocking out and arranging a masterful learning experience for us.  The flow, the events, the props - all indicated the amount of time they had put into this experience for us.

    For anyone wondering if the price was worth it, the answer is yes.

    AAAA++++ would buy again!

    Now to my title - Perhaps this speaks to my own situation as a practicing farmer but I was soaking up knowledge as fast as I could but realized that the depth of knowledge contained in the heads of the Polyface masters far exceeded the 1-hour blocks of time we spent in any one zone.

    Above is Daniel, Joel's son, giving us an all-too-brief instruction on pasture management.  He answered a lot for me, but I had a hundred more questions than could be addressed.

    I think field management could easily be an entire day.  Of course, I am trying desperately to get our fields back up to high productivity, and it's going well enough, so I have perhaps many more urgent questions than the average person.

    Again, this trip was a top-notch event for me and my team and I know from many of the attendees that's a shared sentiment.  So, see you there next year?

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  • Thu, Jul 01, 2021 - 9:13am

    #20

    Quercus bicolor

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 792

    2

    Thank you all for sharing

    I missed it due to family obligations.  I really appreciate a chance to glimpse what you experienced.

    I'm looking forward to another gathering large or small, hopefully sooner rather than later.

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  • Thu, Jul 01, 2021 - 9:55am

    Dontknownothin

    Dontknownothin

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Mar 14 2020

    Posts: 314

    5

    Dontknownothin said:

    Travis,

    One of the best ways to get into the land ownership business is to get vacant land rather than developed land.

    Land loans are hard to come by but raw land is cheaper so you can easily get 5 acres for around $20k in many areas. I have 40+ acres I've gotten this way. That's a small enough loan you can pay it off pretty quickly, and 5 acres is more than enough to become (mostly) self sufficient.

    Your utility will usually run grid power pretty cheap to get you started, you'll need a meter a panel and a receptacle in most cases before they'll turn it on so you can get a camper to live in while developing the land.

    A private well is about 20k in my area, and a septic system is about 40k so all in the basic improvements will cost you around $65k. Personal loans on each little piece is probably the best way to do it over time.

    Its not an instantaneous process, it takes time and if the world collapses in the meantime, then you're no worse off than you are right now so theres no loss.

    While waiting for the money to roll in for each part of the project, you can plan the layout, read up on the native flora to see what your soils nutrients look like, scope out local attractions that might be useful in a post collapse scenario, and fence the property.

    Fencing can be done a little at a time if you don't have anything to contain yet. A roll of wire fencing and T-posts can be an inexpensive way to start while you are just getting going. One roll a month isn't too much money and only one weekend of hard work. So little by little you get to that finish line.

    Of course if you have lots of money, you can get it all done in the first year.

    And as far as equipment. Go with off brand stuff. Mahindra or kubota tractors are cheaper and probably more durable than john deere. And boy are they a time saver, best investment you will ever make.

    I could go all day, but no one would listen more than they had to. Hope that helps.

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  • Thu, Jul 01, 2021 - 1:26pm

    Dan Willis

    Dan Willis

    Status: Member

    Joined: Nov 04 2020

    Posts: 4

    4

    Dan Willis said:

    This is one of the problems we are facing when it comes to growing our business. I do not have a success story yet, but I am beginning to find older farmers that are a little reluctant to just sell the land, but also do not have family that want to take on the responsibility of farming, who are interested in finding working/leasing arrangements. This is one *potential* way to avoid the high cost and debt requirement for farmers just getting started. It's long-term, but I think doable. I will circle back here with what we are doing after July, as we are meeting several older farmers.

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  • Fri, Jul 02, 2021 - 1:02pm

    #23

    Prairie Dock Farm

    Status: Member

    Joined: Dec 03 2008

    Posts: 6

    5

    Attending Polyface Farm Workshop

    I sure enjoyed my time at Polyface Farms… what a delightful group of people, both from Polyface and the PeakProsperity group. Thanks to everyone for being so nice.

    My big takeaway from last weekend’s great adventure, was the simplicity and frugality of the Polyface operation! Not lots of fancy buildings, concrete, pumps, sanitation regimes, electronics and other capital investment. Joel’s methodology embodies the saying of Masanobu Fukuoka, “ Instead of trying to find ways to do this or that, try to find ways not do this or that”, meaning, simplify things when you can. Avoid off farm inputs. Use real-time solar energy as much as possible. Work with Nature, not against her. Limit input, optimize output.

    I’ll bet the cost to capitalize an operation like Polyface is a small fraction of the cost to capitalize a CAFO operation. That is very encouraging! Thier strategies also seem very scalable to me, you don’t have to start big…start small, learn the ropes, grow as you learn.

    Joel’s fiefdom enterprise was also quite intriguing! What an ingenious way to share resources and knowledge, and yet put the ownership of the fiefdom on the individual. 

    It was a very good trip. Thanks to all who made it happen!
    Greg

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  • Fri, Jul 02, 2021 - 4:48pm

    #24

    Tycer

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Apr 26 2009

    Posts: 343

    5

    Joel’s mom

    My wife and I got to spend an hour and half+ with Lucille, Joel’s 97 year old mom. She just stopped driving the past year or so and is very sharp.
    We can’t help but believe that it’s the food she’s eaten that has kept her so strong.

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  • Sat, Jul 03, 2021 - 11:20am

    #25
    Bruno

    Bruno

    Status: Member

    Joined: Feb 03 2020

    Posts: 10

    2

    Great time! How about that Signing Frogs Farm that was canceled due to the plandemic next?

    Thanks so much for the opportunity We had a great time.

     

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  • Mon, Jul 05, 2021 - 8:43am

    #26
    John Holmberg

    John Holmberg

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jun 12 2021

    Posts: 2

    4

    It. Was. Awesome! Thank you

    I had been watching videos and learning, however actually being there and seeing, hearing, and being able to ask questions were critical. Not only did I leave with more information and the desire to learn more, I left with the conviction that I can- and more importantly- will- keep taking steps to food resilience. Joel and family are more than a way to grow food, and to work together, and to live together. The Polyface Farm shows all phases of success- dependence, independence and finally- interdependence. A very powerful and obvious strength of community. Thank you Chris and the Peak Prosperity team for having the gathering, as it also gave members a chance to network and feel like "I am not the only one that sees the need to change and grow".

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  • Tue, Jul 06, 2021 - 12:12pm

    #27
    chris101

    chris101

    Status: Member

    Joined: Dec 10 2020

    Posts: 16

    4

    chris101 said:

    It was definitely an inspiring event for us. Joel Salatin has an aura about him - kinda like a mix of a lumberjack and a buddha. There were so many eye-opening aspects of their farm and story it's hard to name one favorite. But to pick a couple:

    1) the outdoor slaughtering house story about how the FDA almost shut him down only to find out that the bacteria on his chicken was somewhere like 1/36th of the bacteria on industrial chicken (that was washed in chlorine 40x), and

    2) the observation that pasture-raised/finished beef is probably one of the most environmentally friendly endeavors

    ... were two talking points I've used already when talking about our trip to friends.

    Probably our favorite thing though was meeting other PP members (our first time). We'll be on the lookout for future events. On top of that, anything PP could do to further enable us stay in touch in real life would be great.

    A couple things I'd love to learn more about:

    a) more talk about their egg-laying hens would have been interesting

    b) curious what their advice would be for what you can do in a typical suburban yard that is 'Polyface style'.

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  • Wed, Jul 07, 2021 - 5:28am

    #28
    RandomMike

    RandomMike

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Mar 12 2020

    Posts: 273

    6

    Aisling Hill Farm & Mots

    Here is Mots lecturing against globalist control of solar power at Aisling Hill Farm north of Winchester, VA July 27 after Polyface. In addition there were talks on solar water heating, connecting solar panels, charging batteries, and ham radio plus lots of fun for all. Aisling Hill is based on Salatin principles. By chance, I can see the farm from my window in the Winter and my trip there lasted only a few minutes!

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  • Wed, Jul 07, 2021 - 12:28pm

    #29
    Cathy

    Cathy

    Status: Member

    Joined: Jun 19 2021

    Posts: 1

    3

    Great Event

    I was grateful for the inspiration and ideas I gained from Joel, Daniel, and his team and the camaraderie with the PP tribe. Being immersed in a farming system that truly understands "science" and harnesses it in a balanced way plus meeting other free-thinkers who who are taking steps to stay positive and adapt in the never-ending chaos was exactly what I needed.  I'm really looking forward to future events with the tribe!

    https://flic.kr/s/aHsmWavXbj

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  • Wed, Jul 07, 2021 - 10:22pm

    #30
    dreinmund

    dreinmund

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Mar 19 2011

    Posts: 240

    2

    Loved every minute of it

    It was a fantastic event. Everything I hoped it would be. Meeting tribe members in person was great as well. Many good conversations.

    Hopefully, there will be other opportunities in the future to meet up.

     

     

     

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  • Thu, Jul 08, 2021 - 10:09am

    hmcgov

    hmcgov

    Status: Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2010

    Posts: 6

    2

    hmcgov said:

    I missed the bit about 'forgiving' the system. I just remember him discussing the strategy of trying to circumvent the system (implying it's broken beyond repair). Forgiveness is powerful, and the religious context is helpful. I've been studying the Yoga Sutras of Patanjili lately, which lists 5 causes of suffering (kleshas). One cause of suffering is hatred/repulsion/aversion (dvesha). If you carry this with you it will certainly cause suffering. So even if your hatred is rightous and justified, what's the point? You'll just suffer.

    Forgive and circumvent. Seems like the optimal path forward.

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  • Sat, Jul 10, 2021 - 11:15am

    #32
    KiraMarie

    KiraMarie

    Status: Member

    Joined: Apr 25 2020

    Posts: 2

    2

    KiraMarie said:

    I was not able to attend this event due to a family member in need of help, but would love to plan for the next one.  (Hoping!!!)  If there is going to be one next year, would it be possible to schedule it before the end of 2021?  It would really help me to plan hatch and butchering dates.

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  • Tue, Jul 13, 2021 - 10:10pm

    #33
    Mots

    Mots

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Jun 18 2012

    Posts: 463

    6

    fellowship before and after the meeting

    I want to thank everyone who took the time to meet before Polyface in Richmond and after Polyface in Winchester.  It was so wonderful to meet in person.  I finally met Robie, a very warm and down to earth farmer who supplied apple flavored pulled pork.

    Chris Oriel brought a heavy water tank all the way from Iowa and gave a very good presentation on DIY electricity and water heating, which included my own technology.  Chris Oriel wants to be a resource person for electricity at PP and mentioned that he wants to help others learn to build out systems.

     

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  • Sun, Jul 18, 2021 - 1:29pm

    #34
    RandomMike

    RandomMike

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Mar 12 2020

    Posts: 273

    1

    Unsolicited praise

    A friend said

    I think Poly face is down near Staunton and many of the town restaurants use food from that farm on their menus - delicious eating and nice to know it’s all ethically and organic or at least with the environment and livestock health in mind, raised.

     

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