What topic should be next in Agriculture/Permaculture?

Wendy S. Delmater
By Wendy S. Delmater on Thu, Sep 25, 2014 - 6:39pm
Fall planting of food-bearing trees and shrubs
25% (1 vote)
Storing your harvest safely
25% (1 vote)
Winterizing your garden
50% (2 votes)
Total votes: 4

6 Comments

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
also

Other topics since I could only list three choices in the poll:

  • Recipes: using up your home-canned, dried, salted or otherwise preserved foods
  • Food-bearing trees, shrubs and vines: is it time to prune?
  • How to build a pantry for the winter

...or other items you wish to discuss, in the comments. Thanks!

GM_Man's picture
GM_Man
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 4 2012
Posts: 74
Other Items, such as

Other Items such as:

How to prune Apple Trees

How to prune grape vines

Transplanting Raspberries, Blackberries, and/or Blueberries

It's that time of year after all...  ;-)

Cheers

robshepler's picture
robshepler
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 16 2010
Posts: 112
Root cellaring

We have a hundred year old root cellar here on our property and we find it amazingly useful. Most of our canned goods and dry goods go into it, it stays cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Any thing we don't want to freeze pretty much ends up in there if it will not fit in the house.

We hope to build another one for our new house but would like to earth bank the ceiling for added insulation. The engineering is a bit intimidating for me, it would be a whole lot of weight. We have a couple of books, your thoughts or links would be wonderful.

Thank you for what you do Wendy!

 

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
try this book

Root Cellaring, by Mike & Nancy Bubel

Our water table is so high, and we live in s subtropical zone, that this is not practical for us. We are planning on building a cool room in the pump house.

GM_Man's picture
GM_Man
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Nov 4 2012
Posts: 74
Pros & Cons of our root cellar

Our New England home dates back to the mid-1800s.  Half of the basement is still earth and fulfills the need of a root cellar for us.  Most of our canned, pickled and dried food ends up there as well.  However, We do have an issue during the Winter.  The temp in the cellar can drop to 38 deg F during the Winter and this does wonders for keeping the preserved food for storage.  However, it does create a problem in that the floor that we walk on always feels cold.  Especially on the tile in the kitchen.  Something I did not think about at the time I installed that tile.  Ah well.  

I can insulate the floor, but as there are wires and plumbing present all over the place, that will be an inexpensive solution that will work, so I am balking in putting a 1" layer of foam (spray or rigid) under the floor.  Maybe during the first half of Winter when I am doing less outdoors.  As usual, insulation in the right amounts in the right locations will provide a proper ROI and increase the overall livability of this old home.

I am so bad for procrastinating.

I could also insulate (spray foam) the field stone foundation/walls of the cellar, but that may reduce the benefit of the root cellar....

The problem is I really want to run some Pex under that tile and tie it in with hot water provided by Evac Tube solar hot water in order to warm up that tile.  <deep sigh>  

I really must make a flippin decision and just get 'er done...

Cheers!

Shivani's picture
Shivani
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 26 2010
Posts: 10
Root cellar idea

Dirt floor in a root cellar is good.  What we did in our old farmhouse was to partition off a corner of the basement, with insulated walls, door and ceiling, for the root cellar, and run two PVC pipes from there to outside,  one to exhaust air from the root cellar when  it's too warm, the other to bring in colder outside air when the cellar is too warm.  Both pipes have a slider on the end to control or shut off air flow.  The "out" pipe is at ceiling height.  The "in" one extends to the floor.  This gives a lot of control of the temperature, and without affecting the rest of the basement.  Insulating the ceiling of the root cellar area keeps it from making the floor of our kitchen above from too cold.

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