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    Overdosing On Crazy Pills

    If you think everything's OK, you're nuts
    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, July 26, 2019, 3:49 PM

If you prefer to listen to this article, read by its author Chris Martenson, click the player here below:

___________________________________________________________________________________

Sometimes an otherwise-forgettable movie will be lifted up out of obscurity by the internet and made into a useful meme.

In the movie Zoolander Will Ferrell’s character, ‘Jacobim Mugatu,’ screams the line “I feel like I’m taking crazy pills!” because it seems nobody else sees what he does.

I have that feeling nearly every day now. And it’s getting more frequent and intense.

To the point where, some days, it feels like I’m in danger of overdosing on crazy pills.

Crazy Pill #1

Financial bubbles happen. History is full of them.  It’s just that they’re just not supposed to happen more than once a generation.

How can so many people have completely forgotten the painful lessons of not one, but two, recent bubbles?

The bursting of the DotCom bubble in 2000 was traumatic.  “Eyeballs” were favored for a time over “earnings.” But then investors woke up to the fact that all of their rationalizations for the sky-high valuations of profitless companies were actually ridiculous.

Okay, fine.  Lesson learned.  Earnings are actually important.

But here we go, again, less than 20 years after the DotCom bubble (and only 10 years post-subprime bubble — both far less than a full generation later to allow the keepers of the memories a chance to die off) with exactly the same dynamic at play:

% of IPOS with negative earnings

In the pre-financialization era that ended a few decades ago, a more normal mix would have been roughly 15% of IPOs with negative earnings.  Today it’s nearly 80%.

Just as it was in 2000.

By way of example, let’s look at Uber and Lyft.  Both companies aren’t just unprofitable, but wildly so.  The more these companies make in revenue, the greater the accompanying losses:

Lyft revenue & profit chart

(Source)

This is the very essence of a broken business model. It’s no different – literally, exactly the same – as a circa-1999 DotCom losing gobs of money on a pie-in-the-sky business scheme that sounded great but didn’t actually work.

No matter to Lyft’s stock price, though, as the market (or ““market”” as I refer to it because it’s so deformed it needs double quote marks to signify that condition) now values this cash-burning furnace at $18.9 billion:

Lyft stock price chart

Lyft’s stock price just keeps going higher, no matter the losses. One can only imagine how much higher it will explode if Lyft manages to somehow turn in slightly-less-than-negative-as-last-time earnings next quarter.

What matters during an asset price bubble is not the rational, but the rationalizations.  Uber and Lyft are “transforming transportation” and “reducing urban congestion” even though taxis already existed and there’s zero evidence of the latter.

Wolf Richter said it very well in a recent piece:

Anything goes: story stocks, momentum stocks, hyperventilation stocks, consensual hallucination stocks, and financial engineering stocks that generate mind-boggling share prices that give these companies incomprehensible market capitalizations, and the mere mention of “fundamentals” gets naysayers ridiculed and thrown out.

It’s like the whole market has gone nuts.

(Source)

The full quote that goes with the meme is “Doesn’t anyone notice this?!? I feel like I’m taking crazy pills!!”

How can people not notice what’s going on?

Crazy pills meme

Crazy Pill #2

I keep reading articles where hapless financial journalists try earnestly to make sense of a world that is now senseless.

It must be terribly frustrating to see the impact the central bank bubble is having on distorting the markets, but your editors disallow you to point any of that out to your readers.

A recent WSJ article noted that investors poured money into bond funds at a record pace in the first half of 2019. It then went on to explain this as a sign that investors might be cautious about the economy.

Sure, that’s probably a fair conclusion during normal times. But not when crazy pills are being served buffet-style by the world’s central banks.

Instead, we have to note that the world now has a whopping $13.7 trillion in negative yielding bonds – meaning record high bond prices – and negative earning IPOs both existing simultaneously.

When investors are cautious, they move money out of stocks and into bonds.  That’s what the journalist was grasping for, but that’s not what’s happening now.  Money is flooding into both stocks and bonds.  It’s concurrently a risk-on and a risk-off environment — which means its actually neither.

It’s a bubble.

A magnificently-deformed time of monetary excesses.

We’re currently witnessing a massive blow-off top that will end in something quite akin to the Dark Ages – a time of systemic breakdown when we’ll be lucky to preserve the pinnacles of our current technological achievements.  But let’s save that idea for later.

To make the “Bubble!” claim more concrete, let me burrow in a bit.  Switzerland’s government bond market will serve nicely as a case in point:

Swiss 50-yr yield falls below 0%, entire Swiss curve now negative

July 25, 2019

(Reuters) – Swiss 50-year borrowing costs fell below 0% on Thursday for first time since August 2016, meaning Switzerland’s entire government bond market now trades with negative yields.

The 50-year yield fell 2.6 basis points to minus 0.014%.

(Source)

Pick any Swiss bond of any maturity and you’ll have to pay the Swiss government for the luxury of lending it money.

In the case of the 50-year bond, you’d pay $1,000 today for the pleasure of having the Swiss government promise to pay you back $993 in the year 2069.

Heck, even if the bond was paying 0% vs. a negative amount, that would mean that your money has no value.  You give an entity your money and they give you back exactly the same amount 50 years later.

But with negative interest rates, you’re getting even less than that back.

I could possibly make sense of that if we knew that the amount of circulating money was going to fall over time, so there were fewer claims against more ‘things’ over time.  That is, deflation.

But we’re in the exact opposite world with global central banks easing like mad at the moment and promising even more.  Rate cuts. And more QE. And making serious comments about maybe buying equities directly.  Or maybe just print up money and distribute it via MMT.  The central banks have promised in word and deed that they’ll do whatever it takes!

Against that backdrop, what can we make of the hundreds and thousands of individual “investors” that are actually buying the Swiss 50-year bond at a negative yield of -0.014%?

If they hold that bond to maturity, they’re going to get less money back than they put in AND the purchasing power of that money is going to be seriously diminished. What sane person would make that deal?

Again, doesn’t anybody notice this?

Crazy pills meme

Crazy Pill #3

By far the largest crazy pill I am taking, a horse-sized one that feels larger than my throat, concerns the serious consequences with society’s addiction to perpetual economic growth.

Edward Abbey said it best:

Edward Abbey quote

That’s what we’ve got now.

There’s nothing wrong with growth per se. But if it becomes the mission instead of the strategy, then it’s cancerous and self-destructive.

Virtually nobody in power ever questions the “need” for economic growth.  It’s a universally understood imperative, especially among the banking class.

Despite already having supremely frothy stock prices and negative bond yields that require mega-doses of crazy pills to even contemplate, the world’s central banks are desperately scrambling to justify easing more — to drive stock and bond prices to even frothier heights.

And for what exactly?  What’s so urgent, right here and now, about getting even more growth?

In nature, seasons come and go. The sun rises and sets. But if it were up to the central banks, the sun would stay perched at its mid-summer noon apex forever.  Think of the corn yields!

Maybe we can invent a pill that will banish sleep.  Think of the extra productivity of the resulting 80-hour work week!

Meanwhile, casually scanning the headlines we notice multiplying ecological breakdowns like these:

Individually any one of these might be explained away as a fluke. But collectively? They clearly shout that something is terribly wrong with the natural world resulting from our current monomaniacal pursuit of growth.

The current trajectory of the environmental data is frightening. People either are aware of this, ignorant of it, or in denial about it.  Anybody of my age (mid 50’s) who spent time outside as a kid, or has noticed the recent dearth of insects on the screen door on summer nights, can see with their own eyes how the natural world of insects and migratory birds has been collapsing.

Doesn’t anybody else notice this?

Crazy pills meme gif

To me, it’s just a simple statement of fact to say that the economy is a subset of the natural world.  No ecology = no economy.  No oysters in the bay means no oyster fishery.  No soil means no farming.

But the way things are currently configured, within every political and financial institution, along with their compliant media presstitutes, the one and only goal is more GDP growth.

Which means more throughput of ‘stuff’.  Resources + energy = more stuff.

When times get tough and GDP starts looking like it might (gasp!) fall, the State freaks out and floods the world with more money and more credit to cattle-prod the economy back to ‘health’.

The implicit, if not explicit, assumption contained therein is that some sort of salvation, or broad social good, results from perpetual GDP growth.

That was coincidentally true during the 1700’s, 1800’s and most of the 1900’s.  But it’s absolutely not true anymore in the 2000’s. The blind pursuit of growth is now diminishing society’s prospects, not enhancing them. But the keepers of power have not managed to adjust to this new reality.

At least not publicly. Though you should see the number of rich people and high-level government institutions that are preparing for massive disruptions by building world-class bug-out shelters and stocking up years of provisions.

You might consider doing the same. Just in case.

I certainly have.

Conclusion

Being at peace with today’s status quo requires taking crazy pills.  Lots and lots of them.

Such is the nature of late-stage bubbles.

It’s also the nature of civilizations that have run their narrative past the breaking point. Late-empire Romans needed crazy pills to believe in Emperor Caligula. So did the Aztecs when they embraced Cortez.

Towards the end, the leadership of a dwindling civilization isn’t the cause the decline, but reflective of it.  Once the narrative thread no longer makes any sense, having defective leadership is a requirement. It’s something the culture demands in order to keep the perverted status quo going.

This is why I’m strictly apolitical.  It matters not to me whether it would have been Trump or Clinton in the White House.  Either/both would have been similarly defective leaders.  We are badly off the rails at this point, and our political system reflects that.

Similarly, I’m agnostic about who heads the central banks around the world.  Draghi was loathsome, but Lagarde won’t be any better.  Powell certainly speaks more clearly than Greenspan, but he’s literally no different.

Today we have a small cabal of unelected officials, many without any real-world operating experience (such as starting and managing a productive business) setting the prices of not just money, but of every financial asset.  And after they “serve the public” they then rotate into the exact same banks and financial firms that most benefited from their “service.”

How is any of that different from the way the Soviet Union set crop targets and prices?  It’s not.

The bottom line is this:  Nothing will change until the system breaks.

It’s a 100% guarantee that somewhere between here and 2069 interest rates will be either very far north of -0.014% and/or the Swiss franc (and other fiat currency) has become worthless.

It’s a further guarantee that more cities and, possibly entire countries, will run out of fresh water. Agricultural soils will become vastly less productive. And the world will be well past peak oil.

In Part 2: The Antidote To This Insanity, we provide direct steps you can take right now to persevere, and potentially prosper, through what’s ahead. And to be ‘part of the solution’ vs among those still contributing to the catastrophes our culture is creating.

It’s entirely possible that ecosystem collapse will render whole new swaths of the globe uninhabitable to humans.

But, by all means, buy as much Uber and Lyft stock as you want.

But if you do, be sure to chug down a handful of crazy pills first.

Click here to read Part 2 of this report (free executive summary, enrollment required for full access).

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82 Comments

  • Fri, Jul 26, 2019 - 4:37pm

    #1
    GerryOz

    GerryOz

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    Posts: 13

    3+

    Absolutely on the money, Chris!

    Excellent piece, Chris. Couldn’t agree more. You’re not taking crazy pills, you merely have 20-20 vision.

    Catastrophic climate change will not be prevented. It’s already happened. I have stopped worrying about it with the help of an article in The Economist that discusses how we can apply a “discount rate” to the value of the future, depending on how much more important we deem the present to be. Read it.

    I have one son, almost middle aged himself, and he is determined to have no offspring, so we really can ramp up the discount rate! 100% is where I’m setting it. Yes, we’ll take down some other species but Nature is fecund and in a billion years the place will be humming with life again.

    If I had grandchildren, I’d be forced to see things differently. I was listening to a Radio Ecoshock podcast in which one person described buying a mango, itself transported long distances to the point of sale, then another chimed in about driving the mango home in an SUV, then putting the mango into a fridge, and how all this was pretty unsustainable. It struck me then that yes, it IS unsustainable, but it’s a very pleasant way of life, one to which we have all become accustomed, and the alternatives will be nasty. I live on 4 fertile acres and let me tell you, growing your own food is no picnic. One bad weather event and the crop is gone. If we stop transporting food over long distances, if we stop refrigeration, if we abandon vehicular transport, and so on, life will go back to a time when living was brutish, hard and very arduous.

    It would be much, much easier for the whole of society to agree that we are living unsustainably, to agree to continue living in this very agreeable way until we — the current living generation — all die, but also to agree that people should simply stop breeding.

    I see no great trauma in the loss of our species. We have already baked in 3-4°C of heating (last time CO2 was this high, seas were 20m higher, temps 3-4°C hotter, see links below, so it’s just a matter of time now), enough to make living on Earth quite horrible for our descendants, so let’s simply agree that to have to live in this much hotter world, and simultaneously to be forced to give up so much of what makes life tolerable and comfortable, is simply unacceptable, and decide that our collective time on the planet is over. If we have no children, our species’ end is not personally sad. Children would gradually become more and more rare, is all.

    I have a feeling that this is going to happen, one way or another, with or without general agreement, no matter what. I and my son have made this decision already, and from casual discussions I’ve had online, several other people admitted that they too were following that plan, although more unconsciously. It’s simple logic in some ways. Food for thought.

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  • Fri, Jul 26, 2019 - 4:39pm

    Reply to #1
    GerryOz

    GerryOz

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    Links I referred to

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/apr/03/south-pole-tree-fossils-indicate-impact-of-climate-change

    Last time CO2 levels were this high, sea levels were 60 feet higher and Antarctica had trees

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  • Fri, Jul 26, 2019 - 11:36pm

    #2

    Dutch John

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    3+

    You're nog going crazy

    Afbeeldingsresultaat voor you are not going crazy you're just waking up

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 1:15am

    #3
    MAV

    MAV

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    John Oliver Has Trouble Describing What Gives Him Hope

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a_ou5T7rNoA

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 2:00am

    #4
    Rodster

    Rodster

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    5+

    There once was a time where you were considered a deadbeat if you paid with a credit card. Today you are considered a criminal or terrorist if you pay with cash.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 2:04am

    Reply to #4
    Rodster

    Rodster

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    1+

    p.s. Is there a way to edit a comment once it’s posted? I’m not seeing it after PP made the switch.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 4:53am

    #5
    brushhog

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    The biggest crazy pill is the media

    The biggest crazy pill I see everyday is the media which is literally attempting to gaslight the public everyday right in front of my eyes. For anyone who watched the Mueller testimony it is very clear that Mueller gave the democrats nothing toward their goals of impeachment, he reiterated his finding that there was no collusion, and repeated that he made no determination about obstruction. However, the media is presenting a completely different picture of what actually happened! They are nakedly and openly lying everyday. We’ve been watching this for three long years. The blatant lies have ceased to even be shocking anymore.

    What makes the crazy pill even less palatable, is the fact that people keep tuning in. They keep discussing whatever the media says as though it is coming from a legitimate source! No matter how many times they are caught lying, as in the case of the Covington kids or the shameful coverage of the Smollet hoax….they seem almost unaffected by their own incredibility.

    We now live in a completely Orwellian society. The media, which functions as the information gathering unit for society, has completely malfunctioned. Whether it is economic information, political information, global affairs, scientific findings, etc its all now completely fake and it’s tether to real world events is becoming more and more tenuous. If society were an individual, the media being the information gathering “senses” of that person, that person would be hearing things that aren’t there, and seeing things that don’t exist. He would be, for all intents and purposes, a schizophrenic.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 5:05am

    Reply to #5
    GerryOz

    GerryOz

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    Science is not fake

    Brushog said:

    Whether it is economic information, political information, global affairs, scientific findings, etc its all now completely fake

    No, science is not fake. That’s exactly what Chris is saying, that science is being ignored, not that science is fake.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 6:02am

    #6

    davefairtex

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    addictive media

    Try this on for size.

    Definitely the media has gone sideways.  DNC media calls RNC media “State TV”, while DNC media plays the “Trump is Bad” song all day long.  Which the viewers of DNC TV just love.  (After all Trump Really Is Bad.  Didn’t he collude with Russia to steal the 2016 election?  That’s what I heard.  They should just keep looking, they’ll find something if they try had enough.)

    Knee-jerk opposition to Anything Trump Does (which must be bad, by definition) results in very odd things like left wing neocons, democrats abandoning the US working class in favor of free healthcare for migrants as well as open borders.

    But why?

    I blame Facebook, and the trick they learned in hooking people’s attention.  Their technique: figure out what people like, and then provide that to them, 24/7.   You give them their own echo chamber, and they just keep coming back.  Mix that with dopamine shots (like!  like!  like!) and you own their brains.

    But you can’t just provide boring old data.  Turns out, the biggest hook comes from emotions.  Strong emotions.  So that’s either outrage, or something cute.  Trump looking and saying something stupid.  Mixed with cat videos.  Cat videos and outrage.  That’s Facebook’s business plan, with some dopamine (like!  like!) tossed in there too.

    So, to compete, State TV and DNC TV have to compete by doing exactly the same thing.  So its self-reinforcing opinion 24/7, because it makes people happy to have their biases reinforced.

    And if they didn’t do that, their audience would wander off to Facebook, where they’d get what they “need” 24/7.

    Anyone notice how short TV segments have become?  Watch Tucker Carlson.  His guests are on for maybe 90 seconds.  Its jarring to me – I’ve always had an abnormally long attention span – but perhaps to the current viewer, their attention span lasts maybe 60 seconds, so 90 might just be too long.  (I’m guessing here – but there’s gotta be a reason, right?  State TV isn’t stupid.)

    My guess: media and content have all been warped to compete with Facebook, and its 24/7 outrage + 1 minute cat videos.  Outrage.  Cat video.  Outrage.  Cat video.  Flick.  Flick. Flick.  When you have to compete with the buzzing phone (oh look, a NEW CAT VIDEO!) whatever media you provide must be excruciatingly interesting and reinforcing of personal bias, or else your audience flees…

    Bzzzz.  Oh look, a NEW CAT VIDEO!

    TV changes, or it dies.  Killed by Facebook.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 6:03am

    Reply to #5

    Chris Martenson

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    Fake science

    No, science is not fake. That’s exactly what Chris is saying, that science is being ignored, not that science is fake.

    You can’t be quite that declarative.

    Science is conducted by scientists who are people.  People sometimes lie and sometimes they cut corners or cheat.  Sometimes they have a severe conflict of interest.  Sometimes there’s money on the line.  Other times they have a very honest but just as erroneous confirmation bias.

    I have these traps lurking in me, so do you.   One does not become an intellectual  saint with the conferring of a PhD.

    It’s not an ‘at the margins’ sort of a thing either.

    Fully two-thirds of scientific findings cannot be replicated by peers.  It’s something of a crisis in the fields of science.  Wiki has a page dedicated to the phenomenon.

    Here’s what results when you google “percent science cannot be replicated”

    Yes, I think science is a far better method than gut feeling or religion for determining something, I just want to be sure we are all on the same page.  It’s anything but a straight line with captured territory on the left and soon-to-be-unraveled findings on the right.

    Sometimes science goes off in an entirely wrong direction for a very long time leading to one of my favorite quotes.

    Max Plank said that “science advances one funeral at at time.”

    Okay, maybe a Twain or a Mencken gussied that up a bit.  Here’s the actual quote:

    The German physicist Max Planck said “A new scientific truth does not triumph by convincing its opponents and making them see the light, but rather because its opponents eventually die, and a new generation grows up that is familiar with it.”

    So, yes, sometimes science is fake. More often than we’d like. I find this to be especially true in the medical arena and I never simply accept what even my most trusted doctor has to say about something. I take it into consideration and then turn to Google and other opinions before choosing a course of action.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 6:54am

    #7
    Edwardelinski

    Edwardelinski

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    3 Cheers for Puerto Rico's Center for Investigative Journalism!

    Having released 900 pages of corruption,filthy language,homophobic and mysogynistic rants,mocking those who suffered and died in Maria one million people took to the streets and mobilized.From the US govt,NY hedge funds,their own govt, they were robbed blind.They are just getting started.Wish them well….

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 7:44am

    Reply to #6

    Chris Martenson

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    Re: Addictive Media

    I blame Facebook, and the trick they learned in hooking people’s attention.  Their technique: figure out what people like, and then provide that to them, 24/7.   You give them their own echo chamber, and they just keep coming back.  Mix that with dopamine shots (like!  like!  like!) and you own their brains.

    Well, just for fun, here’s what Twitter has decided are the top trends for me to engage with today.

    I’ve labelled them for easier categorization and identification:

    *sigh*

     

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 8:03am

    #8
    DaveGillie

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    Thank You for this Article

    I’ve argued against many “doomers” and arm chair economists for DECADES that growth for the sake of growth is not only not needed, but can be bad.
    This is the first well worded article I’ve ever seen spelling out why.
    Normally all I ever get is attacked for daring to say such a thing (or even ask the question)!
    again, THANK YOU!

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 2:01pm

    #9
    Uncletommy

    Uncletommy

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    4+

    Focus on something that makes a difference! Changes your perspective.

    Sixty pounds off of 20 frames of comb. 60 frames left to extract. Things don’t seem so crazy when Providence abounds.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 2:15pm

    #10
    centroid

    centroid

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    you watch the planets by brian cox and you look at what happened to venus and to me it looks like we are experiencing runaway  climate change. a global emergency is occuring. its not just humans risking extinction. its all of life on earth. we need to:

    measure gdp differently eg/

    redefine gdp . eg:

    Earth sustained index: esi = constant X (1/(%reduction in co2 emmissions))*((1/population decrement))*(forest regrowth-forest cut down)*hard money transactions*(caring for frail and elderly)*( electric vehicle*hydrogen vechicle/petrol vechicle use)

    go nuclear

    go to hard money (then the 1860 trillion dollar/year fx markets and all the resources they consume would vanish)

    go to electric cars

    nuclear shipping

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 2:41pm

    Reply to #5

    Pipyman

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    Best be more precise

    science isn’t fake, some “science” is fake.  Finding your way to truth is the challenge of our time. Accepting everything coming from the scientific community as “truth” as if it’s a synonym for “science” seems like a really bad idea to me. Everything must go through ones “”BS” detector before anywhere else. Always a good idea to see who funded the “science” too; funny how infrequently the findings don’t challenge the sponsor’s narrative and interests.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 2:50pm

    #11
    centroid

    centroid

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    Posts: 9

    1+

    runaway climate change happening now - bill f.

    you watch “the planets” by brian cox and you look at what happened to venus and to me it looks like we are experiencing runaway  climate change. a global emergency is occurring now. its not just humans risking extinction. its all of life on earth. i reckon it could all happen quickly. we are seeing weather conditions hostile to life now.we need to:

    measure gdp differently eg/

    redefine gdp . eg:

    Earth sustained index: esi = constant X (1/(%reduction in co2 emmissions))*((1/population decrement))*(forest regrowth-forest cut down)*hard money transactions*(caring for frail and elderly)*( electric vehicle*hydrogen vechicle/petrol vechicle use)

    go nuclear

    go to hard money (then the 1860 trillion dollar/year fx markets and all the resources they consume would vanish)- make everyone read “the bitcoin standard” by saifedean ammous

    go to electric cars

    nuclear shipping

    in my country: stop immigration (Australia)

    stop having babies (or a 1 child policy)

    we need to propagate a simple message and keep repeating it. here’s what I often write in the comments on zerohedge,

     

    “All roads lead back to the fiat money system:

    Broken countries.  Broken trade. Broken bond markets. Broken manufacturing. Broken businesses. Broken housing markets. Broken Labour markets. Broken people.  Mal-investments. Wealth inequality. Big Government. Mass immigration. Wars. Even climate change.

    End the FED. End the ECB. End the BOJ. End the PBOC. End the BOE. End the SNB. End the RBA

    Bring back The Classical Gold Standard.”

     

    I believe profoundly that the deepest sickness of our modern society is the money system, which shortens our time horizons and reduces our long term planning. There are so many voices out there clamoring to be heard, but with nothing to say, who are in fact malinvestments themselves created by the fiat money system. but because these people are clueless about the changes that have to be made, they are fearful of any change. if only they knew that the economy would adjust the fastest under a hard money standard

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 3:22pm

    #12
    centroid

    centroid

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    1+

    fx markets sucking the life out of the planet - another fiat money malinvestment - bf.

    ps: the fx markets turned over 1860 trillion in 2016. global gdp that year was 75 trillion (fx 25X global gdp). with a hard money standard fx markets would go to virtually zero. we have this huge monster market (fx) that is sucking the life out of the world, that is a by product of the fiat money system. once again, all roads lead back to the fiat money system…. (from “the bitcoin standard”, by saifedean ammous)

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 4:29pm

    Reply to #5
    brushhog

    brushhog

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    “No, science is not fake. That’s exactly what Chris is saying, that science is being ignored, not that science is fake.”

    Alot of what is masquerading as science is indeed fake. It is politicized, censored, and packaged to produce a response. Its become as much a tool for manipulation as the fed and fake news.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 5:30pm

    #13
    pat the rat

    pat the rat

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    stupid

    Stupid is as stupid dose. Forest Gump.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 6:49pm

    Reply to #11
    Nate

    Nate

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    Posts: 337

    Brian Cox

    Close to home

    https://www.osti.gov/sciencecinema/biblio/987953

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 6:58pm

    #14

    Chris Martenson

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

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    Greta Tells It Like It Is

    Here she is in front of the French Parliament, saying things like:

    “Or maybe, you are simply not mature enough to tell it like it is.”

    “Because  even that burden you leave to us children.  We become the bad guys who have to tell people these uncomfortable things because no one else wants to or dares to.”

    “And just for quoting and acting on these numbers, we receive unimaginable amounts of hate and threats.”

    Bold.  Sad.  Because the so-called grown ups are too afraid of losing their prominent jobs and social standing to take a stand, we are where we are.

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  • Sat, Jul 27, 2019 - 10:38pm

    Reply to #5
    GerryOz

    GerryOz

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    Science

    Chris said:

    So, yes, sometimes science is fake. More often than we’d like. I find this to be especially true in the medical arena and I never simply accept what even my most trusted doctor has to say about something. I take it into consideration and then turn to Google and other opinions before choosing a course of action.

    Chris, the only science you referred to in your article was climate science, and that is NOT fake. Yes, medical science has been corrupted by Big Pharma, that we all know. But in climate science, the consensus around manmade global heating has only become stronger:

    ‘No doubt left’ about scientific consensus on global warming, say experts

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jul/24/scientific-consensus-on-humans-causing-global-warming-passes-99

     

    You always have to ask, where is big money on the issue? Just like in the medical sphere, big money will try to corrupt the issue to serve its own ends. In this issue, big money is spreading disinformation and FUD, very successfully, as you can see from some of the comments on this very page.

    When you are told that the plot is that 99% of scientists are contriving an environmental crisis but are being exposed by a plucky band of billionaires and oil companies, you need to check your BS detector!

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 6:08am

    #15
    climber99

    climber99

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    Is there a solution ?

    Is there a solution ? I can’t come up with one. I say to people that peak population will be 10 Billion (or perhaps 12 Billion if we build out some renewable infrastructure and we all go vegetarian), but ultimately the sustainable carrying capacity for the human race without fossil energy is significantly less than this peak, perhaps as low as 1 Billion or below.

    Ok, so when do we burn through our fossil energy (Not to mention fossil water, forests, top soil, etc) ? My estimate is by the end of this Century. Can you imagine? 10 -12 Billion in 2050 then 1-5 Billion in 2100 ? 50% to 90% reduction of the population size in the space of only 50 years?

    In the absence of any solutions, I have begun not to talk about it (unless solicited). I’m too selfish to stop driving, flying, going on holiday. Therefore to talk about it is to Virtue Signal, a sure way to lose friends and is hard to live with in myself. Let’s be brutally clear, I just want to maximise the next 5 years, then another 5 years, then another 5 years etc. This is exactly the same as what the Central banks are doing right now. They see no future, concerned only short term survival.

    Lets be honest, honest with myself. It is my fault that we have got into this mess. Yes, my fault. I wanted that car, that house, those holidays, to drive and fly whenever, cheap food, cheap cloths, cheap stuff. My fault. I prioritised my well being over humanity’s long term future.

    I understand why it is difficult for most people to blame themselves, especially if they have children. Therefore for them, it is easier to be in denial (manned missions to Mars, driverless cars, high speed rail etc.), or imagine some magical energy source or tech (electric vehicles powered by renewables) or to scapegoat others (bankers, the 1%, the other political growth party)

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 6:46am

    #16

    AKGrannyWGrit

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    Science?

    ”‘No doubt left’ about scientific consensus on global warming, say experts“

    Then the “experts” are idiots!  There should always be doubt because that’s a sign of progress, imagination and learning.  To say there is no doubt is to say one has a closed mind.  The article has a specific agenda.  True learning and education inspires thinking it doesn’t shut it down and say believe what I tell you to.  Is that the sounds of sheep bleeting I hear?

    AKGrannyWGrit

     

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 7:01am

    #17

    LesPhelps

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    Posts: 493

    4+

    My Pet Crazy Pill: The “Elephant in the Room” Unmentionable Addiction

    The next time you go to Super Walmart (or a large chain super market) pay attention to the people, from the time you get out of your car until you return to it.  Watch the people in handicapped parking and the people using electric shopping carts.  Watch the people who lean on their push shopping cart out of necessity.

    There is an addiction in the US and Western society that we intentionally ignore and it’s not drugs, or alcohol.

    The “Elephant in the Room” is an appropriate euphemism for addiction to the Western Diet.

    In the US, we spend 5 times as much, per year, on “health care” (2.5 trillion dollars) as we do on the military and yet we aren’t getting healthier.  It is estimated that 70% of that spending is to treat chronic conditions brought about by the Western Diet.

    The Standard American Diet (SAD), or Western Diet, is destroying our health, our health care system (which can, by itself take down our economy) and the planet.  Don’t even get me started about the animal cruelty involved in CAFOs (concentrated animal feeding operations) which we sanction every time we purchase a fast food burger.

    I could quote statistics, but virtually everyone on this website is smart enough to find those on their own.

    Plus, I was just introduced to “backlash” in a recent podcast, on this website.  I have learned, the hard way, that challenging peoples dietary preferences, virtually guarantees backlash.

    I have run into one or two honest responses, however.  Once, when answering that I no longer eat animal sourced foods, meat or dairy, the response was a simple, “I couldn’t do that.”  That’s simple admission of an addiction, though the person who made that statement surely didn’t think of it in those terms.

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 8:06am

    Reply to #17

    davefairtex

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    some backlash

    Les-

    I’m totally on board with what you say about self-inflicted diet wounds.  The amount of engineered crap food out there…its really appalling.  They have PhD food engineers who work overtime sorting out which tastes make us addicted and they make sure to give us a double helping in all of those 100-year shelf-life products in the center aisles of the supermarket.

    I know SP has talked about … I forget, something about some body metabolism thing that changes when you whack the immune system at a young age, it changes your metabolism somehow.  TH2 mediated something-or-other.

    Having said all that – I’m a perfect example of someone who doesn’t want to change my diet – in this way – because I think it continues to work for me.  My BMI is good, I eat mostly what I my body seems to want, I do intermittent fasting, I can still do 5 rounds of pad work even with a month break, and mostly what my body seems to want is vegetables with some meat flavoring.  That and oatmeal.  I don’t know why, but I really love oatmeal.  With nuts.

    I used to eat sausages, but my body stopped liking sausages for some reason.  So no more sausages.

    But there are times when I just want a lamb chop.  Or a steak.  (With green peppercorn sauce).  My body seems to ask for it.  Is that a craving, or am I just sensing what my body wants and responding to it?  I go with “I’m responding to my body”.  Of course, I also want chocolate, and … maybe that’s a craving.  So who can say?

    The cheese I eat, on the other hand, is simply because I love the taste of cheese.  Big fan of cheese.  And milk.

    If there is some vast global horror I can fix by changing my diet, ok.  But as an argument for becoming more healthy?  That’s not what I’m seeing in my own body.  I avoid crap processed foods like the plague, I cook a lot of my own stuff in a crock pot, I try to eat reasonably whole grains, and it all seems to work out just fine.  And its all pretty tasty.

    I’m 5-9 and 158 pounds, give or take.  And did I mention 5 rounds of pad work?

    Years ago, I took a survival class.  We killed and ate a sheep.  I have to say, the sheep was very tasty.  There was a “difficult 30 seconds” where the sheep…passed away, followed by an academically interesting butchering process, followed by a spectacular cooking-and-eating process.  Is this learned behavior, a “craving”, or simply being the evolutionary end product of millenia of omnivore eating?  https://www.boss-inc.com/courses/14-day-field-course/

    I’m not giving up my milk, cheese, stew, and occasional lamb chop because it all seems to be working fine for me.  My wine?  Probably a craving.  The lamb chops?  Sometimes, after a week – or two – I just feel like a lamb chop.  With garlic.  And rosemary.  And olive oil.

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 8:55am

    Reply to #5

    newsbuoy

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    2+

    "there's lies, damned lies and there's statistics"

    There is a difference between “projections” and “predictions” and between science and statistics (hint: not mathematics). As Chris can tell us bean counters are NOT scientists but scientists can be bean counters.

    There is no fake science there is only fake, or bias, in the narrative formed around a set of facts (proven or unproven). Science and it’s practitioners [redacted], [redacted], [redacted] are subject to One truth and that truth is like an infinite fractal. The emotions being expressed are located mostly in the limbic brain. Nature has a built-in biologic Solution to our predicament: DEATH. (problems solved) So, we have a choice, continue to fight death (and gravity (it’s real man!)) or Love the world (as is) and make the best of it.

    https://www.jpost.com/Health-and-Science/Mother-toddler-relationship-a-predictor-for-teen-obesity

    Why would the Kushners be spending time with Ben B. at his Hamptons home?

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 10:04am

    Reply to #17

    Pipyman

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    Sums it up for me!

    Don’t eat meat = body rebels after a while. That’s my experience…..

    grass fed and high welfare. Lovely. Even kill some of my own. Tears and tasty….. lovely

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 11:31am

    #18

    Mark_BC

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 30 2010

    Posts: 320

    3+

    There's no such ting as "science"

    There is a “scientific method” which is an approach to interacting with information provided by the world that aims to minimise observational bias (as far as can be expected given that we are all human) by automatically reverting back to the null hypothesis (i.e. that no relationship can be determined between the things being studied) unless the hypothesised relationship can withstand years of scrutiny by other scientists. I have a lot of faith in the scientific method itself as an approach to analysing and interacting with the world.

    And then there’s this other thing most people are really talking about when they refer to “science” which is the institutionalised entities dealing with techy stuff that few laypeople otherwise understand, and that use the findings of the scientific method to further some kind of economic goal. For example, Big Pharma dives into biochemical topics that few people could really understand, using knowledge gained through the scientific method, in order to make money and arguably do other even less socially constructive things. Similarly, pesticide corporations develop their poisons using knowledge developed through the scientific method.

    A lot of people recognise the bad stuff done by the “scientific” organisations of Big Pharma and falsely equate this with the scientific method, which then falsely tarnishes the image of “science” in the public’s eye. There’s nothing wrong with the scientific method; the problem is in how people and institutions abuse it. Anyways, what alternative is there to science? Gut feeling? Religion? Those didn’t do many good things for humanity over our history. Humanity didn’t really advance until the scientific method became more established. Of course, I’d agree that scientific discoveries have enabled humanity to reach this stage of planetary overshoot, but without science we’d still be stuck in the dark ages defecating in the sewers outside our houses and dying from plagues.

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 1:09pm

    #19
    nedyne

    nedyne

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    2+

    Phosphate rock peak

    The headline about phosphate rock caught my eye. It turns out that it’s based on a peer-reviewed article, that forecasts a peak in phosphate rock production by 2033 (but acknowledges that the year can be way off, even though the peak will eventually come). Pretty eye-catching for a peer-reviewed journal.

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S095937800800099X

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 2:01pm

    Reply to #5
    ecb

    ecb

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    Fake science?

    Yes, Chris I agree with your take on science up to the point where you  rely on and consult Wikipedia and Google. The former has totally marginalized its use and credibility by constant “editing” by those with an ax to grind and desires to “thought shape” and control us. And the latter has become a shameless propaganda machine. Believe either at your own intellectual peril.

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 3:57pm

    #20

    KugsCheese

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    1+

    Boeing https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/BA/balance-sheet?p=BA is trading at a TTM P/E of 39.5 with Stockholder Equity of ~ $5.5 Billion.   That speaks to a dead market.

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 4:07pm

    #21

    KugsCheese

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 01 2010

    Posts: 845

    The negative government bond yield story is reported without mentioning the obvious: these bonds are negative yield because the governments and associated fantasy money machine require it now to finance government deficit spending.

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 4:08pm

    #22

    sand_puppy

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    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 2004

    4+

    Jim Carey on Crazy Pills

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 6:54pm

    #23
    alanrgreenland

    alanrgreenland

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    Posts: 5

    The Line is Older than That...

    I’m enjoying this thread.  My only comment at this point is that the original line, “I feel like I’ve taken Crazy Pills”, was said by Jimmy Stewart in “It’s a Wonderful Life”.  (I suppose Will Farrell’s version was an homage to the original.)

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  • Sun, Jul 28, 2019 - 7:26pm

    #24
    David

    David

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    Crazy Pills and the DotCom Bubble

    I recall reading about the collapse of one of those ‘cash burn’ websites: CDNow.com

    Apparently, at the time of their closure it was calculated that they had been spending (including all costs) $4000 to achieve each CD sale!

    That’s cash burn on steroids.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 1:13am

    #25
    Sparky1

    Sparky1

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    Posts: 64

    Gilroy, CA Garlic Festival Shooting: 15 injured, 4 dead

    Happened today about 5:45 p.m. PST.  One gunman was killed by police, with another possible suspect at large. Police and bystander reports that a rifle was used, with some event attendees reporting hearing multiple rounds of automatic gunfire. The dead and injured (including a 6 year old boy) have not yet been identified. No motive for the shooting has been reported, although a bystander reportedly asked the gunman “Why are you doing this?” and the (now deceased) gunman replied, “Because I’m angry.”

    https://www.cbsnews.com/live-news/shooting-gilroy-garlic-festival-san-francisco-bay-area-live-updates-today-2019-07-28/

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 4:01am

    #26

    Michael_Rudmin

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 25 2014

    Posts: 880

    1+

    pipyman, ecm

    Pipyman: my current plan is to eat meat when it’s offered to me, and not otherwise seek it out (milk and eggs are a different story). It does take some strain on the body.  But it is the minimum I can handle at the current time. I am a carnivore/omnivore; but I minimize it as best I can.

    In line with that, they find that after starvation, people often turn vegetarian for a few years.

    ECM: “believeing” encyclopedias was never a proper research method. Encyclopedias are there to open up the language and some of the references to an incoming researcher.  After you find the references, you search the journals… then the related journals.

     

    Much more offensive right now is the progressive unavailability of journals; and the document reclassification act that takes valid materials (like the Congressional record) OFF the shelves; and the subversion of the journals’ willingness to print research based on threat of lawsuit by the interested and invested parties who stand to lose.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 4:26am

    #27

    Michael_Rudmin

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 25 2014

    Posts: 880

    to newsbuoy, sandpuppy

    (NB 1) what’s this about Ben B?

    (NB2) Even bean counting can be science.  Early on with a phenomenon, you just document the observations.  Later, you use things like accounting (bean counting) to try to get a handle on what is going on.  Whenever you have a physical symmetry, you have a conservation (such as conservation of energy, momentum, mass, and so on) At that juncture, bean counting can help you identify what is quantified, and what is not.  And yes, economics of dollars can play into the bean counting of science too… if your symmetries’ topic is that.

    (SP) Speaking of the inutility that is Google, I can no longer find a link to the Congressional Testimony of the American Pediatric Association on forcing vaccines.  Do you still have that?

    It’s been Zeroed (maybe we can make that a new term, coin a new word, Just like Google!)

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 5:53am

    #28

    Chris Martenson

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

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    Posts: 4797

    5+

    Crazy Pills - Strong Economy or Already Collapsing?

    The mainstream narrative says that the economy is doing okay, not growing super fast, but solid.

    Wages have been climbing, inflation might be a tad too low, and generally speaking everything is headed in the right direction, with a big Thanks(!) to the Fed for their careful and masterful stewardship.

    The other narrative is that the Fed has really only shoveled money into financial markets that has mainly benefited the already rich.  The Fed MBS program sought to drive up house prices and it succeeded.   Inflation has been raging for people who have to rent or buy homes, and for anybody paying into or utilizing the sick-care system.

    Which narrative to believe?

    Well, I think it’s as simple as using one’s own eyes.  Remember a recession is when your neighbor loses their job, a depression is when you also lose yours.

    For the people in the video of a quick trip through downtown LA  the depression is already here.  Collapse has happened.  It’s right there to be seen with your own eyes.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 6:24am

    #29

    sand_puppy

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

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    Posts: 2004

    6+

    Garlic Festival, Chaos and Optimism Bias

    I must admit that the Garlic Festival shooting in Gilroy California hits me pretty close to home.  I grew up in South San Jose and worked near the San Jose/Gilroy border.  Family often attended the Garlic Festival there.

    My points:

    1.  To quote John Mosby, the Mountain Guerrilla

    Things are f*cked up.  And they are going to be getting a lot more f*cked up.

    Here at PP we have some ideas about how and why society is moving towards a breaking point.

    2.  The horse is out of the barn.

    Weapons are widespread and available with the most violent among us guaranteed to always be armed.  The only question is whether the common people will be armed also.

    3.  The police have no duty to protect. Each of us is on our own.  This is very hard for some to understand.  ‘The State’ will not protect you and your family.

    I recommend people read the case that prompted this legal ruling.  It concerns a home invasion in Washington DC in 1975.  Even after several calls to 911 dispatch there was an absolute failure to effectively investigate  the ongoing crime scene.  The victims were held prisoner, raped, beaten an abused for 14 hours.  But the details of this case do not matter.  The point is the ruling that the police are not responsible for a failure to protect.  This is not a criticism of ‘the police,’ just a clarification of the logistical and legal limitations of their role during a crime.

    Do you understand that?

    Do not hide and whimper helplessly.

    You must protect yourself and your family.

    4.  Do not stand in front of a stampede.

    When hundreds and thousands of animals begin running together, get out of their way.  We have listened to the crash course and read CM, Orlov, JHK and CHS essays.  We understand that the herds will bolt at some point.

    5.  Accurately and realistically understand the dark side of the human heart.  Careful with that sweet and comforting belief that “people are good” and “that could never happen to me.”  If the rules of society shift to a more primitive structure, catch on to this change and adapt promptly.  (The final adaptation time available might only be seconds.)  Good people with kind hearts have a terrible blindness to the intentions of those who do not have the ‘compassion chip” installed on their mother board.  (“I refuse to believe they could ANYONE could DO that!!”)  This inability to understand can be fatal.  Please “get it.”

    The numbers I have heard are ~4% of the population is sociopathic (opportunistic predators, unmoved by compassion).  You may not notice these people’s true colors unless you meet one in a dark alley late at night.   Another 1% are psychopathic (conscious predators, unmoved by compassion).  These rise to the top of finance and government, intelligence agencies (and some have private islands and coordinate blackmail networks.)  They launch economic and kinetic wars, and stage mass violence against their own populations and write the legislation to imprison their own peoples.  They wear suits, act friendly and reasonable, behave as senior-statesmen and rational opinion leaders.   Yet if their actions are examined, we may see that they are killing tens of thousands.

    Dealing with the psychopath is like facing a con man.  The words spoken hide the real intent.   (Things like “I must read all of your emails and monitor your location to protect you.”)

    Picture:  Nicolo Machiavelli, an articulate psychopath who explained his though processes so that non-psychopaths could understand them.  (Thank you, Nicolo.)

    Breaking away from the classical political theory (inherited from Cicero) that sought to make virtue the condition of power, Machiavelli (1469-1527) asserted that only the appearance of virtue counts, and that the successful prince must be a “great simulator” who “manipulates and cons people’s mind.” The tyrant he most admired was Cesar Borgia, who after having appointed the cruel Ramiro d’Orco to subdue the province of Romania, had him executed with utter cruelty, thus reaping the people’s gratitude after having diverted their hatred on another.

    Guyénot, Laurent. JFK-9/11: 50 Years of Deep State (Kindle Locations 3113-3117).

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 6:52am

    Reply to #29

    Adam Taggart

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2686

    6+

    Extremely close to the Gilroy shooting

    SandPuppy wrote:

    I must admit that the Garlic Festival shooting in Gilroy California hits me pretty close to home.

    Same here. I drove by Gilroy yesterday at what must have been within minutes before the tragedy there. So close time-wise that it could have been happening as I was driving past (though I didn’t notice anything at the time)

    Who the hell would shoot families at a garlic festival? (I suppose the better question is: Who the hell would shoot families anywhere?)

    This is definitely a symptom of a society falling into despair and moral collapse. It’s what happens when opportunity and purpose are stripped from the populace by a power structure committed to doing “whatever it takes” to concentrate advantage into those controlling the system.

    Exploding homelessness, opioid addiction/deaths, consumer overindebtedness, murders & mass shootings — all classic signs of cultural desperation.

    And these are still the “good times”.

    How much more kinetic stress will the next recession add to our unstable social order? When mass layoffs return and public subsidies are cut?

    As much as I believe a deep recession is an essential requirement (one of many requirements, mind you) to getting our economy back to a more sustainable/healthy/fair baseline after being so badly distorted for so long, I shudder at the probable wounds (both literal and psychic) our culture will suffer going through it.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 8:00am

    #30
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Posts: 2272

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    Extremely Convenient Timing

    Sad to say, taking all of this with a heaping tablespoon of salt moving forward. This event in particular given the developing Jeffrey Epstein exposure and other recent events of interest.

    For those interested, consider paying attention to any significant narrative shifts in the MSM narrative as the storyline develops over the next few days. Dave Collum’s review of Las Vegas is an excellent example of this (Part of the 2018 Year in Review).

    Whether it is an organic event or false flag – sympathies for those directly impacted regardless.

    “Former Clinton and Al Gore political consultant Naomi Wolf explains why we should be skeptical of overly theatrical news stories. Propaganda is legal.”

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 8:03am

    #31

    Mark Cochrane

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    Posts: 828

    7+

    Signs that your economic growth has become cancerous

    1. Yippee, another hurricane! Wind and flooding = destruction but that leads to new construction and repair which counts as economic growth, increasing the national GDP!

    2. Building bombs is much easier than building bridges and buildings. Blowing things up in other countries has become more important to economic ‘growth’ than maintaining our own infrastructure.

    So just how long is it going to be before some geniuses figure out that it would be much more efficient to just blow up our own buildings and bridges? The economy gains both by making the bombs and rebuilding the destruction caused by them….. Just imagine the  growth in our ‘gross’ domestic product…..

    Crazy pills?

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 8:14am

    #32
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Joined: Jun 08 2011

    Posts: 2272

    Correction

    *2017 Year in Review

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 8:17am

    #33
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Joined: Jun 08 2011

    Posts: 2272

    Edits?

    Will user comments become editable again at some point? Just curious, thanks!

    Here’s the link to the 2017 Year in Review, Las Vegas discussion.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 9:22am

    Reply to #30

    Mark_BC

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    Posts: 320

    2+

    I agree, Time2help

    I agree, I think that at this point the default reaction to any “mass shooting” propagandised by the media to pull at our heartstrings should be that it is fake unless otherwise proven by real evidence. I haven’t spent any time looking into the garlic shooting (apologies to the victims if it was indeed real), but I will not jump to any larger conclusions about how “society is falling apart” based on it until I do. At this point, I probably won’t bother because I have better things to do than chase down yet another “mass shooting” story.

    As for the “worst mass shooting in US history” up until its time (Orlando night club), only to be exceeded soon after by the Las Vegas massacre (which was, unfortunately, a real massacre, but not perpetrated by parties that the media wants you to believe), the evidence that Orlando was a disgracefully blatant hoax is so overt that one would have to be in either of three camps to actually believe it as fact: 1) part of the evil segment of society perpetrating these hoaxes, 2) blissfully unaware of the evidence, or 3) in deep denial.

    Here is some of the official news footage of the event. You’ll see at around 19 seconds in, the brave “rescuers” carrying the bloody injured with the red shoes. Where to, I’m not sure, since they are actually carrying the “victims” back TOWARDS the still active ongoing “shooting” at the Pulse nightclub. And why would people be carrying them anyways? Everyone knows that you should tend to injuries with the victims on the ground. And why is it that 50 police cars showed up, but it seems that only about 1 ambulance decided to stop by during the whole event, even though the main Orlando hospital is literally like 4 blocks down the road?

    Anyways, you’ll see that at 0:29 the footage gets cut off. There were other videos on Youtube that showed longer footage, of a few seconds extra that slipped out into the media on Fox News, which show those guys putting the “victim” down on his own two feet (what a miraculous recovery!!!), take a step back, look back at the camera with a big grin because they thought it was finished rolling, and then do a little celebratory dance. Highly odd behaviour for people desperately carrying the injured back to “safety”. Unfortunately I can’t link the video to that because Youtube deleted it on grounds of violating policies on “bullying”, when all it as doing was showing footage from Fox News that slipped out onto TV that someone recorded.

    Here is a still image of what happened a few seconds after the footage ends. Might not be highly convincing as an image, but if you see the actual video it is impossible to deny.

    [img]https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/48405773856_77336721cc_b.jpg[/img]

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 9:24am

    Reply to #33

    Mark_BC

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    Yes, this inability to edit is quite annoying!! For those interested you’ll just have to copy and paste that image link.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 10:08am

    #34
    ixpieth

    ixpieth

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    Crazy Pills unwrapped.

    “It is no measure of good health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society”

    J Krishnamurti.

    I think both issues Krishnamurti mentions above are covered here in the thread, thanks to all contributors.  One question I do have is the issue of “borrowing from the future”, which proved “the” single answer in 2008 and headlines again at the Paris Climate Summit in 2015.

    CM mentions Uber and Lyft as examples of negative profit companies with soaring stock prices and I wonder whether Tesla is a similar/better example. Over a life cycle analysis EV’s do save emissions, so now everyone wants to get in one. But as they stand in the showroom, brand new and sparkling, the embodied energy comparison between EV’s and an equivalent ICE vehicle is that you have a >70% “ecological debt” in embodied emissions before you start the engine and begin driving.

    Why not, I’m worth it, is the usual answer to credit card splurges, whereas my father would not buy anything unless he could pay for it. So credit broke that barrier and we have been borrowing from the future since. That evolved with the infamous Australian “businessman” Alan Bond, (who ‘relieved’ the U.S.A. of “it’s” property, yachting’s Americas Cup with the “winged keel), who calmly stated – “if you owe a bank $1 million, you have a problem, but if you owe a bank $100 million, the bank has a problem”.

    I think “Greed is Good” and the dot com bubble was a precursor to all this, everyone, “sort of” knew computers were the future, and pre 2008 housing was as safe as – “houses”, now most of the “High Net Worth Individuals” ($1 million + in assets) are perhaps there only because of the property they hold title over, despite 2008 showing housing was not safe at all.

    The Paris Climate Agreement was lauded as the solution to climate change, but the strategy for staying under 2.0C warming has to be seen for what it is.

    There is no plan to “cap” emissions at 1.5C, or 2.0C, we go sailing past what were once “targets”, as no-one really wants to give up the lifestyle they have inherited, albeit loaded with debt.

    The answer is “Negative Emissions Technology”, in the creation of a global liquid carbon sequestration “industry”  which by 2050 has already stashed 100 billion tonnes of liquid carbon underground. This “industry” is now gearing up post Paris as the E.U. carbon price gets out of the gutter and is now standing around 25eu per tonne, people are now moving quickly to provide an industry TWICE as big as the existing global oil/petroleum industry and by 2050 the International Energy Authority ‘speculates’ 10 billion tonnes of liquid carbon will be sequestered every year.

    This is what the world signed up for in 2015 to save the planet, pass me some more crazy pills. A discussion between Andrew Revkin and Vaclav Smil from 2009.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 10:28am

    Reply to #33

    Adam Taggart

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    Working on restoring comment editing

    Just letting folks know we are indeed aware of the comment editing issue and working to fix it. Somehow, the feature got removed during a recent update and we’re working on getting it restored.

    Thanks for your tolerance. We’ve successfully squashed the vast majority of the bugs from the recent site migration, but Murphy’s Law is alive and well and keeping us on our toes as we go over the bugs that remain.

    cheers,
    Adam

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 11:07am

    #35

    Snydeman

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    /chuckles

    “media presstitutes“

     

    So totally stealing this one.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 11:27am

    Reply to #35

    Chris Martenson

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    Re: /chuckles

    So totally stealing this one.

    Actually, you’ll be re-re-re-borrowing it.

    Original author unknown.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 1:02pm

    #36

    Snydeman

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    More anecdotal evidence...

    As if we need more anecdotal evidence on the environmental shifts going on, this post from a friend in Germany popped up on my feed:

     

     

    And this is just the beginning!

     

    Here in Baltimore, we’ve had a few weeks in a row of scorching 90+ temps, including a record-breaking weekend of 100+, which was preceded by a thunderstorm line that brought down three large limbs from one of my silver maples. Thankfully no structures were hurt, and I’d harvested the potatoes from that bin two days prior. Big blessings in a minor tragedy.

     

    To add add insult to injury, my screen door continues to be void of insect life on nights when I leave the lights on, and I haven’t seen a single lightning bug all season. In Maryland. In summer.

     

    I will continue to do what I can, but I fear we’re long past being able to stop this.

     

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 1:04pm

    #37

    Chris Martenson

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    How Crazy Are We? TX and ND have the answer

    From an article on natural gas prices:

    If the natural gas industry had hoped that a stunning heat wave sweeping over a large swathe of the East Coast would rescue prices, they are surely now disappointed. Natural gas prices continue to fall, despite the heat, and there is little prospect of a rebound. On Friday, spot natural gas prices fell by another 3 percent, dipping below $2.20/MMBtu.

    Record production from the Marcellus is one of the main reasons. But oil drillers are also to blame. The frenzied pace of drilling in the Permian – which, to be sure, has been slowing as of late – has produced a wave of natural gas so large that the industry is flaring enormous volumes of gas because of the lack of pipelines. Texas regulators seem unwilling to regulate the rate of flaring over fear of hurting the industry, so the flaring continues.

    (Source)

    This is a complete tragedy.  Perfectly usable energy being flared, burned into the night sky and the bright light of day, 24/7 all because nobody wants to dare tell the industry to slow down a bit.

    What kind of reason is that?

    One that future generations will look back on with derision and well-founded contempt.  This is the same as the if the US park service decided to cut down all the last giant redwoods and sequoias under their care because they feared slowing down the local timber industry.

    Or harpooning whales and sinking them because that made whaling a tiny bit faster and more dollar-efficient.

    The times call for intense conservation and careful use of every BTU.  Instead we’re ripping it out of the ground so fast some has to be simply burned into the air while some of the rest has to be turned into a liquid and shipped across oceans at a tremendous loss of energy.

    This is just insane.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 2:53pm

    Reply to #30
    Doug

    Doug

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    A couple observtions

    1.  Adam – I am happy to see that you didn’t immediately jump to the typical conspiracy theories about the garlic festival shooting that pop up every time there is a mass shooting somewhere.  Your speculation that they are a sign of general cultural deterioration is much more plausible to me than assuming that the shootings a) didn’t happen, or b) were done by the ‘deep state.’

    Mark BC  “As for the “worst mass shooting in US history” up until its time (Orlando night club), only to be exceeded soon after by the Las Vegas massacre (which was, unfortunately, a real massacre, but not perpetrated by parties that the media wants you to believe), the evidence that Orlando was a disgracefully blatant hoax is so overt that one would have to be in either of three camps to actually believe it as fact: 1) part of the evil segment of society perpetrating these hoaxes, 2) blissfully unaware of the evidence, or 3) in deep denial.”

    This is an opportunity for a potentially fruitful conversation.  As I recall, shortly after the Orlando shooting, SP jumped on the conspiracy theory, but was later dissuaded when someone he knew (I believe an EMT who actually responded to the shooting) confirmed that it happened.

    Perhaps you two can discuss.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 4:04pm

    #38
    CrisisMode

    CrisisMode

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    But, but, but . . . It can't possibly last another 30 years . . . can it??

    Yep, everybody talks about how it’s all going to end up nasty pretty soon.

    You know, Japan has been living with zombie banks, zombie corporations, zombie government . . . since 1989.

    Thirty years going on now.

    You know, the last time I was in Tokyo (18 months ago) it looked pretty damn good to me.

    Who’s to say the Fed, the PTB, the MICC, and Wall Street, can’t keep this shit show alive for another 30 years too?

    Who/What is definitely going to stop them??

     

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 4:35pm

    #39
    ezlxq1949

    ezlxq1949

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    The Final Conspiracy Theory

    After watching Vaclav Smil’s exposition and accepting that his data and analysis are correct, I agree with him that BAU’s goal of burying CO2 underground is physically, energetically and economically impossible.

    But BAU insists that the opposite is true and will not resile. Indeed, it cannot, for obvious reasons. I observe much time given to promoting carbon sequestration as THE technique to deal with climate change (which is not happening, by the way) and give us a way to continue eating, drinking and being merry. And damn stupid.

    This is why I call it the Final Conspiracy Theory. Its inevitable failure kills us.

    By the way, the cult of neoliberalism requires a market in everything so that resources may be allocated the most efficiently and profits taken accordingly. I wonder where they imagine a market in carbon sequestration will come from, and how will it operate? Who will it benefit and, more to the point, who will it not benefit?

    Nah, we’ve lost all agency over CO2. Maybe there is one hope left: water vapour.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 4:40pm

    Reply to #38
    alanrgreenland

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    @CrisisMode:  Climate change.  10 meters of sea level rise in the next 30 years (instead of the half-meter by century’s end predicted by the IPCC).  That’s “who”.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 4:43pm

    Reply to #39
    alanrgreenland

    alanrgreenland

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    @exlsq1949:  Yes, we can “hope” that Earth ends up like Venus.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 5:02pm

    Reply to #38

    Snydeman

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    Everything in Japan

    I’m not sure I’d say things in Japan are fine…

    Japan’s Youth Suicide Rate highest…

    Or, this:

    “In Japan, suicide borders on a crisis level, though the government has been active in intervention to decrease the risk of suicide among vulnerable populations. It is the leading cause of death in men among the ages of 20-44 and for women among the ages of 15 to 34.

    In Japanese culture, suicide, in some circumstances, has long been viewed as an honorable way to die. Consider the kamikaze pilots during World War II, whose greatest honor was to dive-bomb a plane into an Allied warship and die in the process. The practice of military suicide has been going on since at least the time of the Samurai warlords and is one factor in Japan’s high suicide rate.

    Japanese men are twice as likely to commit suicide as their female counterparts, particularly after a divorce. Of special concern is suicide among men who have recently lost their jobs and are no longer able to provide for their families. They may feel that they have dishonored themselves and their families and that suicide is the honorable way out of the situation. With a high cultural tolerance for suicide, many older adults end their lives after they retire. Aokigahara Forest, at the base of Japan’s Mount Fuji, is a hotspot for suicides, as hundreds of people go there each year to end their lives. Police regularly patrol the area for suicide victims and survivors.”

    Or the numbers showing Japanese young people aren’t having much sex.

     

    Seems like a culture that has lost itself somewhere, and it’s not alone. The number of millennials turning their backs on lots of traditional things seems to be a trend across the developed world, and I would posit that this is what happens when cultures and the people in them lose their sense of purpose, existence, or connection.

     

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 5:26pm

    Reply to #38
    CrisisMode

    CrisisMode

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    Everything (?!) in Japan?

    Well, at least they have Universal Health Care.

    And, they don’t have 900 military bases to support around the world.

    And, their population ages far longer than any other population.

    And, And, And,

     

    Snydeman,

    We can sit here an cherry-pick data all day and night long.

    I’m up for that.

    But one can choose any country on the face of the Earth, and make their case.

    Opioid  addiction doesn’t run deep in Japan, if you catch my drift.

     

    As in *other* countries.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 5:29pm

    Reply to #38

    Snydeman

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    Absolutely!

    Agreed, but I would see the opioid crisis here and suicide problem there as different faces of the same malady. My point is that 30 more years on life support isn’t living, whether in Japan or here in the US.

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 5:34pm

    Reply to #38
    CrisisMode

    CrisisMode

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    Similar choices, often give similar outcomes

    Thirty years is not even a nanosecond refraction of light off an iris, in geological history.

    30 years means an ocean rise of several meters simply forces coastal populations to move inland.   Big Deal. Human race: been there, done that.

    Humans have migrated over vast continental masses to avoid climate change for 100s of thousands of years.

    So, what’s new?

     

     

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 6:57pm

    Reply to #38

    tourcarve

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    Posts: 12

    Japan R Not Us

    Yep, everybody talks about how it’s all going to end up nasty pretty soon.

    You know, Japan has been living with zombie banks, zombie corporations, zombie government . . . since 1989.

    Thirty years going on now.

    You know, the last time I was in Tokyo (18 months ago) it looked pretty damn good to me.

    Who’s to say the Fed, the PTB, the MICC, and Wall Street, can’t keep this shit show alive for another 30 years too?”

    Who/What is definitely going to stop them??”

    CrisisMode –

    Maybe the answer lies here:

    In an interview by Grant Williams (“The Startling Consequences of Monetary Policy”), Stephanie Pomroy says that Japan is the example everyone points to regarding MMT. “There happen to be some pretty important differences between the US economy and Japan. The most obvious to me is that Japan in internally financed; they don’t rely on the rest of the world to finance themselves.” (At around minute 20)

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 7:08pm

    Reply to #38
    CrisisMode

    CrisisMode

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    Debt is Debt, doesn't matter to who it is owed . . .

    “The most obvious to me is that Japan in internally financed; they don’t rely on the rest of the world to finance themselves.”

     

    It’s still debt . . . they are in debt over the top of their head.

    If it’s owed internally, or it is owed externally, it is still debt,

    and debt must be PAID or DEFAULTED on.

    One or the other.

    Doesn’t matter to who it is owed.

    Pay or default.

    Those are the two choices.

     

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  • Mon, Jul 29, 2019 - 8:20pm

    Reply to #38

    Snydeman

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    My chips...

    all my chips are on “default.”

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  • Thu, Aug 01, 2019 - 12:40pm

    #40

    AKGrannyWGrit

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    Consequence

    It really isn’t terribly significant in my mind what, when and where the downturn, crash or catalyst happens. And we can all argue the details for a long time.  What matters are the consequences when it does.

    Are you prepared for the consequences?  And opioids and suicide are one form of preparation.

    AKGranntWGrit

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  • Thu, Aug 01, 2019 - 4:37pm

    #41
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    FBI Document Warns Conspiracy Theories Are A New Domestic Terrorism Threat

    Pandora’s box?

    FBI Document Warns Conspiracy Theories Are A New Domestic Terrorism Threat (HuffPost)

    “The FBI assesses these conspiracy theories very likely will emerge, spread, and evolve in the modern information marketplace, occasionally driving both groups and individual extremists to carry out criminal or violent acts,” the document states. It also goes on to say the FBI believes conspiracy theory-driven extremists are likely to increase during the 2020 presidential election cycle.

    The FBI said another factor driving the intensity of this threat is “the uncovering of real conspiracies or cover-ups involving illegal, harmful, or unconstitutional activities by government officials or leading political figures.” The FBI does not specify which political leaders or which cover-ups it was referring to.”

    For folks over at the FBI who are interested in looking into cover-ups…you might consider listening to these Fire Department Commissioners (FD Leadership) from the Franklin Square Munson Fire District (just east of Queens) in New York as they pass an important resolution last week.

    Here’s the salient point just after 8 minutes in. Or rewind and you can catch the Pledge of Allegiance before the meeting begins.

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  • Thu, Aug 01, 2019 - 8:04pm

    #42
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    New York Area Fire Commissioner Christopher Gioia on Seeking Justice for Fallen 9/11 Firefighters

    New York Area Fire Commissioner Christopher Gioia on Seeking Justice for Fallen 9/11 Firefighters (9/11 Free Fall)

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  • Thu, Aug 01, 2019 - 9:10pm

    Reply to #42
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Re: New York Area Fire Commissioner Christopher Gioia on Seeking Justice for Fallen 9/11 Firefighters

    For those short on time… 34:00 in the above podcast gets particularly interesting.

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  • Fri, Aug 02, 2019 - 3:34am

    Reply to #39
    ixpieth

    ixpieth

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    CCS

    Hi “e….”

    Here in Europe, where the Norwegians have been socking away 1 million t,p.a. into their oilfields for 20 years it´s thumbs up. As this clip, full of boffins from Boris´team show. England has an empty oil field to fill up, and the E.U. carbon price is touching 30eu p.t.

    Carbon Capture, Utilisation and Storage (CCUS): Time to inject a new sense of urgency?

    This is exactly what the world signed up to in Paris.

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  • Fri, Aug 02, 2019 - 8:05am

    Reply to #38

    Mark Cochrane

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    Seriously?

     

    Humans have migrated over vast continental masses to avoid climate change for 100s of thousands of years.

    So, what’s new?

    Let’s see…

    1. The human population is over a thousand times higher now. Populations then were in the low millions or less, now we are scaling the 8th billion.

    2. Sea level rise took place over a period of thousands of years. Now we are looking at decades to centuries.

    3. Natural resources were plentiful then. Now, not so much.

    4. Human populations were nomadic then so picking up and moving wasn’t so difficult. Moving Miami going to be a real bear…. Wonder where we will put it?

    So to answer your facetious question, quite a lot actually is different. Don’t worry though, the bacteria will be fine.

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  • Fri, Aug 02, 2019 - 8:42am

    #43

    newsbuoy

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    Chris Hedges Excerpt: The Great Flood

    How many times will we rebuild Florida’s cities, Houston, coastal New Jersey, New Orleans and other population centers ravaged by storms lethally intensified by global warming? At what point, surveying the devastation and knowing more is inevitable, will we walk away, leaving behind vast coastal dead zones? Will we retreat even further into magical thinking to cope with the fury we have unleashed from the natural world? Or will we respond rationally and radically alter our relationship to this earth that gives us life?

    Civilizations over the past 6,000 years have unfailingly squandered their futures through acts of colossal stupidity and hubris. We are probably not an exception. The physical ruins of these empires, including the Mesopotamian, Roman, Mayan and Indus, litter the earth. They elevated, during acute distress, inept and corrupt leaders who channeled anger, fear and dwindling resources into self-defeating wars and vast building projects. The ruling oligarchs, driven by greed and hedonism, retreated into privileged compounds—the Forbidden City, Versailles—and hoarded wealth as their populations endured mounting misery and poverty. The worse it got, the more the people lied to themselves and the more they wanted to be lied to. Reality was too painful to confront. They retreated into what anthropologists call “crisis cults,” which promised the return of the lost world through magical beliefs.

    “The most significant characteristic of modern civilization is the sacrifice of the future for the present,” philosopher and psychologist William James wrote, “and all the power of science has been prostituted to this purpose.”

    Continued here:

    The Great Flood

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  • Sun, Aug 04, 2019 - 10:12am

    #44

    David

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    Saudi Prince MBS Plans Mega-City w/ Human Gene Editing, Artificial Rain

    When I read this, this “crazy pills” posting came to mind …

    Saudi Arabia unveiled plans for a Futuristic “Mega City” 33X the Size of NYC and it costs a staggering $500B.

    The in-development Saudi Arabian city-state will have robot maids, flying taxis, and glow-in-the-dark sand, according to confidential planning documents obtained by the WSJ.  An artificial moon will light up the sky every night, and a Jurassic Park-style island will let visitors mingle with robot dinosaurs.  And there are plans for the forcible relocation of local tribes, the creation of human gene-editing clinics, and 24/7 government surveillance.

    https://futurism.com/saudi-city-neom-human-gene-editing-artificial-rain

    https://www.wsj.com/articles/a-princes-500-billion-desert-dream-flying-cars-robot-dinosaurs-and-a-giant-artificial-moon-11564097568

     

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  • Mon, Aug 05, 2019 - 8:45pm

    #45
    Sparky1

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    US Army awards multi-year contract for 310,000 personal radiation dosimeters for "warfighters" deployed CONUS and OCONUS

    Today FedBiz Opportunities announced a multi-year sole-source award ($$ amount redacted) to Mirion Technologies for 310,000 personal dosimeters for Army personnel (“warfighters”) deployed on and off the continental US. The justification document states that Mirion was the only vendor to meet key Army requirements, including (summarized): 1) must detect both residual gamma and neutron radiation; 2) must be able to accurately measure dose from prompt gamma and prompt neutron radiation from a nuclear criticality event (e.g., a nuclear blast or criticality event at nuclear power industry; 3) provide real-time display of dose and connectivity….

    Makes you wonder what scenarios they are prepping for.

    Here are the sources and  links of possible interest:

    FBO award notice:  https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=1e7900dee6fa90235d2a24fb6d194894&tab=core&_cview=0

    Sole-source award justification:  https://www.fbo.gov/utils/view?id=e5c6507b4ff24bef5651def7ae378f95

    Mirion Technologies dosimeter data sheet for “military and homeland security applications:  https://mirion.s3.amazonaws.com/cms4_mirion/files/pdf/spec-sheets/mbd-2_ops915.pdf?1562160850

     

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  • Mon, Aug 05, 2019 - 11:18pm

    #46
    Sparky1

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    Dayton shooting, type and quantity of spent ammo retrieved

    I don’t agree with all of the views and nor do I follow this blogger regularly, but he has posted information and resources at times that have proven unique and accurate in the past.  I don’t know the source of the blogger’s information re: type and quantity of spent ammo retrieved at the site.

    Potrblog.com reports via Twitter:

    “based on quantity of recovered .45cal brass it would appear that a significant number of #Daytonshooting victims @ #NedPeppers where hit by police handgun fire through front door

    48 rounds .45 cal pistol
    16 rnds .223 rifle
    1 shotgun rnd

    note right screen [in video]

    LiveLeak Dayton, Ohio Police release surveillance video from Dayton…
    Police release surveillance video from Dayton mass shooting Dayton, Ohio police have released surveillance video that captures footage from the mass shooting…

    youtube.com
    10:52 AM · Aug 5, 2019″

     

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  • Tue, Aug 06, 2019 - 6:12am

    Reply to #46
    Doug

    Doug

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 01 2008

    Posts: 1375

    1+

    Ammo

    Two reports I read this morning state that authorities recovered “at least” 41 shells fired by the shooter.  I assume they were .223s as his weapon is reported to be a modified AR15 type gun.  Its unclear to me how it was modified to accept a high capacity drum mag.

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  • Tue, Aug 06, 2019 - 7:10am

    Reply to #46

    thc0655

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

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    Posts: 1555

    2+

    No modification needed

    And it’s out of stock. I wonder what that means?

    https://gunmagwarehouse.com/kci-ar-15-223-5-56-100-round-drum-magazine-with-personal-loader-and-pouch.html

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  • Wed, Aug 07, 2019 - 11:19am

    Reply to #38
    TechGuy

    TechGuy

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 13 2008

    Posts: 306

    Re: Seriously? Climate change

    The population is the problem not climate change. Global temperatures & sea levels have been increasing for the past 50K. No told people to move to miami or any flood plane. No measures are going to stop a crisis. if you eliminate all CO2 emissions the planet is still going to continue to warm for the next 25K years & sea levels will continue to rise.

    FWIW: Two more critical crisis are going to hit in the next 10 years (way before Miami) is under water):

    1. Democraghics Cliffs & Debt: Pensons & entitlements aren’t funded and the mountains of debt (Gov’t, Consumer, Student, Corp) is going to prevent any mitigation to avoid a crisis

    2. Peak Oil; this is going cause CO2 emissions to level and decline on its own, but also taking the global economy with it. Everything runs on Oil. Its possible that Peak Oil production will happen this year or with the next 2 to 3 years. Only US Shale growth is preventing Peak Oil from starting.

     

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  • Thu, Aug 08, 2019 - 3:48am

    #47

    sand_puppy

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    Professor Joseph Mifsud Deposition: The starting point of Russia-gate

    From Bryan Cates, Uncover DC.  July 29,2019

    “While most of the political world focused its attention elsewhere, special prosecutor John Durham’s team quietly reached out this summer to a lawyer representing European academic Joseph Mifsud, one of the earliest and most mysterious figures in the now closed Russia-collusion case.”

    ‘Twas Misfud who contacted Trump advisor Papadapoulos saying he had “dirt” on HRC.

    Mifsud is the academic that reached out to Trump campaign advisor George Papadapoulos in early 2016 in London. Mifsud made a claim to Papadapoulos about the Russian government having ‘dirt’ on Hillary Clinton that they were willing to share with the Trump campaign. When details of this conversation between Mifsud and Papadopoulos was brought to the attention of the FBI more than two months later, it directly led to the agency  launching its “Crossfire Hurricane” counterintelligence investigation of the Trump campaign on July 31, 2016.

    The FBI investigation into Trump’s Campaign started with Professor Misfud.

    So there’s no doubt whatsoever about Mifsud’s central role in launching what became the Crossfire Hurricane investigation run by former FBI Deputy Director … and later morphed into the Mueller Special Counsel probe.

    According to the Trump/Russia collusion narrative, [Mifsud is] the only real bona fide Russian agent involved in any part [of the Russian Collusion story].

    Now, the deposition of Joseph Mifsud has been completed and tapes have been given to US Attorney John Durham and the Senate Judiciary Committee.

    From the Epoch Times

    [Reporter John] Solomon [of The Hill] is reporting that an audiotape containing professor Joseph Mifsud’s deposition has been given to both U.S. Attorney John Durham’s investigators and to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

    “I can report absolutely that the Durham investigators have now obtained an audiotape deposition of Joseph Mifsud, where he describes his work, why he targeted George Papadopoulos, who directed him to do that, what directions he was given, and why he set that entire process of introducing Papadopoulos to Russia in motion in March of 2016, which is really the flashpoint the starting point of this whole Russia collusion narrative,” Solomon told Fox News’ Sean Hannity.

    “I can also confirm that the Senate Judiciary Committee has also obtained the same deposition,” he said.

    There is a suspicion that Mifsud was working as an FBI asset.  [These deposition tapes will validate or invalidate this suspicion.]

    If this turns out to be true, it was an FBI operation that lured Papadopoulos to meet an FBI asset pretending to be a Russian that justified the FBI to launch its Russian Collusion investigation

    You cannot save the Russia-Gate narrative if there were no real Russians in the story.

    Political commentator Brian Cates believes that others know of the Mifsud deposition but are NOT PURSUING IT or REPORTING ON IT as it does not support the Russian Collusion narrative and reveals it to be a hoax.

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  • Sun, Aug 11, 2019 - 6:49pm

    #48
    Sparky1

    Sparky1

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    Joined: Jul 21 2016

    Posts: 64

    John Lennon, 1968, "Our society is being run by insane people."

     

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