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    It’s Time To Position For The Endgame

    Are you, like us, sensing that things are poised to fall apart?
    by Chris Martenson

    Friday, August 7, 2020, 9:00 PM

Do you sense an approaching endgame?

Like there’s another heavy shoe to drop? Perhaps an entire closet’s worth?

Certainly there’s entirely too much confusion surrounding SARS-CoV-2 and how to deal with it.

Should people wear masks?  Will schools re-open?  Should they?  Why isn’t Covid-19 being treated consistently across medical centers?  Are there things we could and should be doing to minimize the impacts before people catch it?

I believe there are good common-sense answers, even if complicated, to these and many other related questions  But common sense is in short supply these days, especially amongst our “leaders” in the US (who actually act like bad managers).

Our clueless politicians busy themselves either pandering to or hiding from the media cameras when it comes to Covid-19 response. Meanwhile, Big Pharma is doing everything it can to direct the action in ways that funnel any profits into its pockets — public health be damned.

It’s a certified shit show. No question about it.

But It Gets Worse

Beyond the pandemic, the central banks are busy ignoring Plutarch as they embark on the grandest social experiment in all of human history by floating billionaires’ yachts ever higher as more and more average folks drown beneath the rising waterline.

Displaying either a level of tone-deafness exceeding that of Marie Antionette, or a level of psychopathy matching that of Ted Bundy, the US Federal Reserve is — RIGHT NOW — engaged in the largest transfer of wealth in all of US history.

Between March-April 2020, the Fed added a staggering $282 billion to the bottom-line wealth of US billionaires:

But that wasn’t enough.

So the Fed kept printing. And buying, buying, and buying more and more financial assets held – of course – mainly by the already-wealthy.

By May 2020 the total added became $434 billion, making all the US billionaires more billionaire-y:

But even that wasn’t enough for the Fed.  So it printed even more, increasing the total to $583 billion by June:

Yep, you guessed it. It didn’t stop there. By July, the grand total was up to $637 billion:

Considering that US GDP dropped by -32.9% (annual rate) and clocked in at an annual rate of $19,408 billion in the second quarter of 2020, the US Federal Reserve had granted an astonishing (truly!) 3.3% of the entire output of the entire country to US billionaires.  For doing absolutely nothing.

Yes, people have many reasons to be angry and to protest these days. But they ought to be furious with the Federal Reserve and its lackeys in Congress who have utterly and completely failed to check these egregious, unfair, and socially destructive policies that grossly reward the elite at the expense of the bottom 99%.

Let’s do a little math here. Handing 3.3% of the value of the entire economic output of 160,000,000 working people to roughly 600 individuals is the equivalent of granting each one of those 600 billionaires the entire yearly output of 9,020 people.

It’s like the Fed decided that each billionaire deserved to have 9,020 people become their slaves for the year.  How is that *not* psychopathic?  How is that fair?  What’s the plan here? Keep going until these 600 people own everything in the world?

And where’s the media on this? They happily parrot every statement the Fed makes, without asking even the slightest of critical questions. They are failing us badly, too.

Okay, so why should you care?

Because what the Federal Reserve is doing generates enormous systemic risks which could well destroy the economy and much of our future prosperity.

At heart, I am a conservative in the sense that I’d like to keep (i.e. “conserve”) what we’ve got, both ecologically and economically. I’d vastly prefer that we change our nation’s destructive path now on our own terms than being forced to on reality’s terms later on. As painful as the former may be, the latter will be much more so.

History is complete on the matter: one cannot print one’s way to prosperity.  It’s been tried over and over again and my view is that if it could be done, we’d all be speaking Latin because the Roman Empire with it brilliant engineers would have figured it out millennia ago and would never have collapsed.

If the Romans couldn’t work it out, it simply can’t be done.  Mathematically, it also doesn’t pencil out.  Money is a social agreement, a contract.  It’s not real wealth.  Taking the attempt to the extreme, what would happen if everybody had a billion dollars and nobody had to work?

So printing currency only manages to delay and exacerbate the inevitable by building up the energy for its own destruction.

And the longer the delay, the worse the reckoning when it ultimately arrives.

Being Resilient

Given the fact that America is doing a supremely poor job of managing Covid-19 at the national level – mirrored by many other countries worldwide – it’s all but certain that ‘the economy’ (such as is was) is not coming back.

Tens of millions of jobs have vanished and are not coming back in time to save our over-indebted system.

The central banks’ efforts to prop everything up by jamming stocks, bonds and derivatives to higher and higher price levels are seriously misguided.  Such efforts both add to social injustice – a friction that eventually bursts into flames – and badly distort the price discovery mechanism which then leads to faulty economic and financial decisions.

As Charles Hugh Smith writes:

 If the “Market” Never Goes Down, The System Is Doomed

August 6, 2020

“Markets” that never go down aren’t markets, they’re signaling mechanisms of the Powers That Be. Markets are fundamentally clearing houses of information on price, demand, sentiment, expectations and so on–factual data on supply and demand, shipping costs, cost of credit, etc.–and reflections of trader and consumer emotions and psychology.

If markets are never allowed to go down, the information clearing house has been effectively shut down. Whatever information leaks out has been edited to fit the prevailing narrative, which in this moment is “central banks will never let markets go down ever again, so jump in and ride the guaranteed Bull to easy gains.”

The past 12 years offer ample evidence for this narrative: every dip draws a near-instantaneous monetary-policy response that reverse the dip and gooses markets higher.

That permanent monetary intervention distorts markets doesn’t matter to participants. Who cares if markets have become “markets,” simulacra of real markets that are now nothing but signaling mechanisms that all is well so buy, buy, buy? If gains are essentially guaranteed, who cares that markets are not longer information clearing houses?

Indeed. There’s no reason to care until the fatal spiral downward surprises us all.

(Source)

Yes, it’s all about narrative control. Which is why we cannot trust our health authorities, our monetary authorities, or our political authorities. Each are engaged in their own interlocking versions of narrative control that stretch further and further from the truth (and obvious common sense) with each passing day.

Charles’ words above remind of why we need to care: a fatal downward spiral awaits, one that will catch much of the world by surprise.

Which then brings us to resilience.  More and more people are turning to self-reliance, in whole or part, as they correctly assess that the rising risks.  Social decay, erosion of public services, loss of trust, and even failure points in the food system.

These risks threaten the very bottom of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs: food, shelter, water, and safety.

In the post-Covid-19 world, gun sales are up and urban apartment sales are down.  There’s a cultural sea change occurring, not that you know it by the mainstream press. As with most important things, it’s ignored at first:

Here at Peak Prosperity, our wish for you is to be happy, joyous, healthy and to live in peace and safety.  In a word: resilient.

To get there (and stay there) you’re going to have to try new things, skate to where the puck is going to be, and take some risks.

Myself? I moved to the country, bought cows, chicken and pigs, and have a garden.  These things bring me joy and provide me with food security.  I’ve had more than half of my net worth stored in gold and silver for a long time now, because I knew that someday the Endgame would arrive.

We’re there.  The Fed’s recent actions are nothing more and nothing less than a final looting operation.

Same as every other time in history, the last official act is to loot the Treasury.  But today, in the US, we don’t have a Treasury with anything of value left within it.  It has no gold, neither does it have any silver.  It has a negative net worth, with a Net Present Value (NPV) of approximately -$200 trillion.

So what’s left to loot?

The answer is both grubby and disturbing: the purchasing power of every dollar in circulation. 

That’s all that’s left to loot.  At least at scale.  We’re not (yet) to the point of the government confiscating half my chickens, which I half-jokingly (and half not) expect may come to pass once everything falls apart.

Every bank account, every reserve dollar, and every dollar claim is going to be debased.  There’s nothing to debate or even argue about because it’s all right out in the open:

Fed Weighs Abandoning Pre-Emptive Rate Moves to Curb Inflation

Aug. 2, 2020

The Federal Reserve is preparing to effectively abandon its strategy of pre-emptively lifting interest rates to head off higher inflation, a practice it has followed for more than three decades.

Instead, Fed officials would take a more relaxed view by allowing for periods in which inflation would run slightly above the central bank’s 2% target, to make up for past episodes in which inflation ran below the target.

“It would be a significant change in terms of how they are thinking about” the trade-off between employment and inflation, said Jan Hatzius of Goldman Sachs. “A lot of those things look very different now from the way they looked a few years ago,” he said.

(Source)

Translation:  The Fed is going to let inflation rip. And the media’s favorite Fed apologists will do their best to convince us this is actually a noble and good act.

As I’ve explained extensively, inflation is merely government-enabled theft.  It steals a tiny bit from everyone’s past efforts, saved as money, and transfers those bits mainly to itself and a few well-connected insiders.

Snip a penny’s worth of purchasing power from every dollar and you’ve nipped 1% off of tens of trillions of stored dollars.  1% of $1 trillion is $10 billion.  So many tens of billions of dollars of purchasing power is being snipped and transferred.

It’s one of the oldest games in the book, and the Fed’s apologists and enablers help them keep the game covered up.  But it’s not hard to understand if you take the time to look.

Your financial resilience depends on your understanding of inflation and how it works.  My Crash Course chapter on Inflation is a good starting point — you can watch it here.

It’s Time To Position For The Endgame

Between Covid-19 and the Fed’s crazy actions, there’s not a lot of hope of returning to normalcy any time soon.

A lot of people have already arrived at that conclusion. A growing number have already moved to homes outside of cities, where at least they have a degree more control over their destiny.

That’s a good thing, in my view. But it’s just a start.

If current trends continue, we’re actually looking at many years, possibly decades of very difficult times.

But how to prepare? What path will the system follow as it fails us?

In Part 2: Is High Inflation Now A Bigger Danger Than A Deflationary Crash?, we revisit the probabilities of what’s more likely to transpire next given the massive monetary and fiscal actions the authorities are proving themselves willing to take.

Is a crash still a realistic threat? Or will the purchasing power of our currency be sacrificed in the name of “doing whatever it takes!” to prevent the elites from ever having to suffer losses?

The future success of your preparations depend entirely on the answer to this question.

Click here to read Part 2 of this report (free executive summary, enrollment required for full access).

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42 Comments

  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 6:56am

    #1
    Hladini

    Hladini

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    Posts: 226

    14+

    About that narrative.......

    Hello and Good Morning!  I found an interesting study this morning:  https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04460703

    The Yale clinical trial is all about what narratives are the most effective in persuading people to take the Covd19 Vaccine.  It's worth a read.

    On the resilience side, I have good news.  When I attempted to buy a high end pressure canner, it's not shipping till November.  When I bought seeds for the second time this year, 90% were out of stock.  When I thought I'd pick up a few more cases of Ball jars, none were left on the shelf.  When I ordered a simple hand pump for the well, the local guy had installed 5 the week before, and 4 more the week mine was installed.  (Yes, now I have fresh water from the aquifer by hand pumping.  BTW, this does not solve the problem of bathing and washing, not unless you want to pump water for a long time.)  When I ran into these limitations,  I actually felt hopeful!

    My take away is that Americans are preparing, they are building in resilience.  I think we might be surprised by the number of folks that are preparing.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 7:20am

    #2
    Mysterymet

    Mysterymet

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    The USA is preparing

    We are turning into a country of “doomsday preppers” and I say that is a good thing. At least that is the way it is here in fly over country.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 9:15am

    #3
    girlflower

    girlflower

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    where is a good place to locate to?

    Dear all,

    I live in CA in the Bay Area. I would prefer to buy a land close by because I still need to work to support my young 4-year-old twin sons. I want to buy land fertile for farming/gardening with good resilient community believing in our peakprosperity ideology. Does anyone know where I shd be looking at pls? Or can you PM me what you see from where you are if you live close to the Bay Area pls?

    I am open to moving to OR as well. Does anyone live there who can tell me more abt good resilient communities in OR pls?

    Pls help, and thank you beforehand!

    Sincerely,

    Girlflower

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 9:35am

    Kathy

    Kathy

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    Kathy said:

    Read a beginning of the trial link.

     

    Wow, and you know there is some advertising “expert” doing this for every message out there.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 10:17am

    #5

    Jim H

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    The latest deceit regarding money... a rant.

    I came to my initial awakening through the same pathway Chris did...  trying to understand the nature of money and investments.  Simply stated, Chris was one of the few who correctly predicted the GFC of 2008 in advance.  He did this because he rejected everything we are told to believe about our financial system and he went about discovering for himself how it actually works and what the implications are.  This truth seeking modus operandi has served the tribe well through the years, with an ever growing component of crowd-sourced dialogue in play.

    The untethered, debt-based fiat currency that we currently use for money is a confidence game.  In theory it could probably work as well as hard currency if the money creation mechanism was completely and transparently algorithmic, and if the cost of money, i.e. the interest rate were left to the market to decide, with banks being left to fail if they make loans that are too risky, or don't charge an interest rate that reflects risk appropriately.  This depiction is a fantasy world compared to reality.

    Relative to this ideal, which would entail allowing the scarcity of money to float freely based on supply (willingness to loan) and demand (for loans) and would imply some degree of balance between periods of deflation and inflation... the true story of our money is told through one of the most data-rich charts of all time, thankfully updated by Doug Short on his website;    https://www.advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/2020/07/14/a-long-term-look-at-inflation

    The data tells us that after about 1955, the level of control asserted over the system by our central bank became so pervasive that the market for money ceased to exist - we were now in a fully controlled regime - the scarcity integrity and related market behavior of our previously hard (i.e. Gold) money system, reflected in the fairly balanced periods of inflation vs deflation seen in the late 1800's, was now lost completely.

    We know that the suppression of Gold's dollar price - the neutering of it's canary-in-the-coal mine function through increasing levels of paper futures price manipulation as well as the effective funneling of investment demand into potentially unallocated vehicles like SLV and GLD, has played a role up until now in the deceit that the dollar has real value, but the depth of the deceit goes way beyond that.  One can get a college degree in economics without ever learning that all of our money (other than that printed by central banks as QE - a new feature of the system since 2009) is loaned into existence - meaning that if demand for loans ended, our money system would collapse into a money destructive, deflationary heap.  Who knew?  (Chris did).

    This brings me to my rant - and I have never seen any other commentator point this out:    The idea that quantum computers can and will have some positive impact on the world of finance, trading, and portfolio management is yet another conceit brought to us by the same elitist masters of money whose job it is to make sure our confidence in their money is unshakable.

    Quantum computing is real, and very exciting for those of us involved in chemistry and materials... in the next decade we expect that increasingly powerful quantum computers, tethered closely to powerful classical computers, will open the window to the design of chemicals, materials, and drugs based on first principles in a way that was imagined by Paul Dirac almost 100 years ago, but never thought possible due to the intensity of the math.  As it turns out, chemical discovery will be approachable long before quantum computing is scaled and error-corrected to the point of being able to solve the factoring problem that underlies the breaking of encryption.

    If you want a wonderful, easy to digest, and entertaining introduction to quantum physics and the exploitation we call quantum computing, I highly recommend watching this, the second in a series of lectures Scott Aaronson gave last year in Zurich, starting at about the 40-minute mark;

    https://video.ethz.ch/speakers/bernays/2019/5564a353-d71b-46d4-bfc0-fa907de5de25.html

    So what's my point?  The point is this, just to give on example;

    https://www.ibm.com/thought-leadership/institute-business-value/report/exploring-quantum-financial

    Powerful quantum use cases
    Quantum computing’s specific use cases for financial services can be classified into three main categories: targeting and prediction, trading optimization, and risk profiling.
    We explore potential use cases in each of these categories, providing examples that apply to three main industries in financial services: banking, financial markets, and insurance.
    As a corporation, IBM and others that are playing this game are not acting irrationally... there is always money to be made if you can sell your wares to those who wield the money funnels.  But the whole thing is a silly game, especially in this case.. and I have already explained why above.  As Scott Aaronson explains so well in the referenced video, all of physics actually runs (like application software) on this fairly simple form of probability math.  The rules are fixed.  The rules don't change.  We can exploit quantum mechanics to model... well.. quantum mechanical systems because we are pretty far down the road of understanding the rule set.  Chemistry is governed by quantum mechanics, and is hence predictable.
    What about things relating to money?  If there is one thing you can bet on, it's that the rules will change as the system gets deeper into trouble.  The idea of central banks printing huge amounts of money and buying debt instruments was literally absurd  prior to GFC.  Later we saw some central banks printing money and buying stocks to hold on their balance sheets - say what?  The idea that a quantum computer could give one some kind of incremental advantage in creating a model to predict future direction and or events, in the context of the shifting sands of central bank policy, is literally absurd.  To the uninitiated, which is almost everyone in this case given the fairly small cross section of people that understand both money and quantum computing, the endeavor makes the realm of money and finance seem like something weighty and important.  The effect is to further cover up the nature of what it really is;  The ultimate playground of the elitist, grifter ruling class.

     

     

     

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 11:32am

    #6

    Quercus bicolor

    Status: Silver Member

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    Posts: 404

    What about quantum computing for short term gain?

    Jim, you wrote:

    What about things relating to money? If there is one thing you can bet on, it's that the rules will change as the system gets deeper into trouble.

    What are your thoughts on whether quantum computing could be used for short term gain given the relatively stable rule set over very short time frames of seconds to days to a month or two?  Of course, the rules could eventually change and cause a reversal of fortune, but that could take a while and a strategy of taking wealth out of the game and into real assets as it accumulates could mitigate that.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 11:50am

    #7
    2retired

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    2retired said:

    Subject and discussion made me listen to Jim Morrison (5:1) again after all those years...no one gets out of here alive

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 12:50pm

    Gigi Ryan

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    This in response to "I live in the Bay Area and want to know where to relocate"

    Hi;I am a realtor in Siskiyou County up at the far north border of CA & OR. We are the 4th largest geographic county in the state with a total population of 45,000. 78% of it is owned by the FED/State, timber companies and railroads. It is an agricultural based county. My husband and I decided in 2005 to build on 25 acres with 2 water streams (irrigation rights from 1870). We are totally off grid and have a high producing well, room to raise all farm animals and good privacy. You can't see our house from our driveway entrance. My husband was the editor for a book by Sun Bear in the 1980's called Black Dawn Bright Day which predicts what is happening now. If you want some help, I'd be happy to talk with you. You can find me in the phone book! 🙂

    Gigi Ryan

    Mt Shasta, CA

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 1:55pm

    Jim H

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    Quantum computing

    Could QC give an advantage in financial calculations over a very short timeframe?  I don't think so.

    Quantum computers are only going to be useful for certain classes of problems, including those that can be framed as optimization, like the classic travelling salesman problem.  While many calculations in the realm of finance are in fact optimization problems in nature, one is still at the mercy of whatever underlying model you are employing.  Any model for short term trading is going to use some fairly limited subset of everything knowable... maybe it for instance would analyze news headlines for critical terms and that would be one variable.  While this could get exponentially hard as the model variables stack up... the lack of perfection with which any one variable could be presented or depicted still, in my opinion, precludes any real advantage.

    The math for a lowest energy state (electron orbital) model of a molecule becomes exponentially hard to the power of the number of electrons interacting... but again, the rule set underlying these interactions is fixed - we don't lack the model, or model accuracy - we lack the computational power to run it.

    You have to ask yourself if economics is a science or not?  Academic economists love to publish papers full of mathematical complexity, but there is a reason it's called, "the dismal science".

     

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 1:56pm

    #10

    Adam Taggart

    Status: Platinum Member

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    Inflationary news: Pres Trump just announced several executive orders

    President Trump just announced executve orders that will:

    1) Eliminate the payroll tax

    2) Extend unemployment benefits by $400 per week, down from $600

    3) Extend the suspension of student loan repayments through the end of the year

    4) Extend protections against evictions

    Trump also announced his administration is considering cuts to income taxes for lower and middle-income individuals, and to lower capital gains taxes.

    The announced payroll tax cut and the proposed income/cap gains taxes are inflationary. Hold tight to your hard assets!

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 5:21pm

    Hladini

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    Hladini to Kathy

    Yeah, it's a real psyops being deployed against us.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 5:34pm

    #12
    Hladini

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    A new angle on the Fed

    Not sure  if  anyone here is following George Gammon, but he just did an erase board presentation on what the end result of all this Fed policy will be and it looks like the banks are cannabalizing themselves - at least the big banks are eating up the little banks, once the bait-ball is gone, they'll have to turn on themselves.

    Thought I would share the presentation,  it really makes you wonder....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0IHHiQIM2BM&t=5s

     

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 5:59pm

    Quercus bicolor

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    Quantum computing

    I get it Jim.  It's like numerical weather prediction.  The model physics are perfect if you can get to a high enough model resolution that you don't have to parameterize things like turbulence or cumulus clouds or the transfer of heat and moisture to and from the ground.  If your computer is powerful enough, you can solve this problem - even with the total computing power required scaling to the inverse of the 4th power of the grid spacing.  The problem is that you can't know the initial conditions of the model to anywhere near that level of detail.  How can we measure the temperature, wind speed and direction, humidity, etc. on a 1 km grid much less a 100 meter or 10 meter grid?  That will limit predictability of smaller things like thunderstorms to perhaps a day or two and larger scale weather features to a week or two.  At the smaller scales, even the unpredictable things people do will impact state of the model.

    People are using machine learning to get the last extra bit of value out of short term weather prediction.  But at some point, possibly very soon, it will run up against the wall of not having enough information to feed to your model.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 7:14pm

    Anne1111

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    Anne1111 said:

    East Bay, Orinda, CA.  Very tight and educated community of families. Neighbors still deliver cookies to new neighbors when they move in and dinners if someone is ill. Pop. Approx. 19,000. Not too accessible. Lots of open space, trees and hills. Homes have yards and gardens for growing. Good luck.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 7:20pm

    Redneck Engineer

    Redneck Engineer

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    Redneck Engineer said:

    Gammon is very good at explaining complex ideas in a straightforward, clear manner.

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 9:02pm

    #16

    LesPhelps

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    Where to relocate

    Seems to me a low population density rural farming area with a good water source, well away from any of the humongous population centers would be ideal for prepping.

    Remember, if you move after TSHTF, then you will essentially be an outsider, where you move.

    Chris mentioned cows, chickens and pigs.

    Here’s something to consider.  The Great Apes are essentially herbivores.  Humans are a member of that tribe.  We have demonstrated that we can exist, in a state of compromised health, while consuming a highly processed, omnivore diet.  Sure, this practice has allowed us to populate portions of the planet where plant food sources are inadequate, but at a high price, both in terms of our health and the health of the planet.

    If you are planning to prep on a budget, consider prepping for a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle.  This approach seriously reduces the acreage and capital investment required to sustain yourself.  It’ll substantially improve your health and reduce your carbon footprint as well.

    Chris describes us as the people who are willing to challenge our assumptions and I agree with him on most subjects.  However, ask yourself this.  Does the Western Diet include items people crave?  Is it possibly an addiction?  If that is true, it’s a formidable barrier, even for us.

    Just “food” for thought.

     

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 9:32pm

    #17
    centroid

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    centroid said:

    what if one or more countries decided to make their currencies hard money backed. would this mean others would have to follow to maintain a competitive advantage or would greshams law apply where bad money (fiat) drives out good money (gold or bitcoin backed)

    great article Chris

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  • Sat, Aug 08, 2020 - 10:15pm

    timot78

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    QC for H/W ML for S/W

    QC  - to my knowledge  - is just a shear computational power – exceeding the current CPU-s by an order of magnitude or more.  What Financial Calculations do you have in mind?  Trading algorithms?  HF trading ?

     

    The winning scenario as of today (and QC will speed this up) is Machine Learning (ML) in self teaching via AI  the trading patterns and taking advantage of that.   Some HF-s already successfully implement that strategy ( https://www.ft.com/content/338962c0-eeaf-11e9-ad1e-4367d8281195  ).

     

    It is also a known fact, that QC will be able to figure out the 32/64-bit keys to cryptocurrency wallets.  That’s worrisome.  Sounds like 128- or 256-bit , 512-bit? keys will soon be necessary to protect the wallets.  Etc, etc.

    QC is the next wave in H/W, but for trading and FinTech - this is ML in S/W.  At least, that’s my take.  The leaders in ML are not IBM-s, but Google and probably Chinese S/W companies like Tencent (example: https://digital.hbs.edu/platform-rctom/submission/machine-learning-and-tencent/  ).

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 2:43am

    VTGothic

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    Thanks Hladini!

    That's the clearest presentation on the difference between a free market and crony capitalism I've yet seen - and why increased regulation is not the answer.

    They are points I'm continually advancing. I'll be sharing it.

    It's particularly effective if watched twice, because the 3rd step informs the 1st step, but steps 1 and 2 are necessary preliminaries to grasping the 3rd step.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 3:51am

    #20
    pokjbv

    pokjbv

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    The end indeed

    I have followed you for so long Dr. M, mostly here but at Mish Talk as well.

    I have never much like the idea of preppers and trying to become self-reliant in this hyper modern and ultra interconnected world because it is a way to avoid actually rolling up your selves and FIXING what is wrong in our society rather than just telling the world to F off and going your own way as best you can, I see that as a disaster for us all and a self-fulfilling prophecy.

    Well, till yesterday anyway. What changed my mind? The executive orders signed by Putin's protégé, Trump. People are yammering about how it is political theater of a desperate candidate who is losing even as early voting gets underway in the coming week. The democrats promise swift action in the courts.

    What people just are not understanding here is that this was in effect a coup d'etat, the president has seized powers that the constitution strictly forbids the executive branch. The appropriations clause ignored. The power of the purse, the only real power of the US House, is the sole domain of the legislative, and this is what really makes America function even when it appears not to because of gridlock, it is the separation of powers and these are our checks and balances and they are now in the history books.

    And, it is not like Trump did not carefully plan this, or should I say Tsar Vladimir carefully planned this because it was troll farm activity that sowed the resistance to good practices in the US against the pandemic. As well, you can look back and see that Trump had diverted Pentagon funding for use on his Big Beautiful Wall.

    The executive branch does have some limited discretion to shift funds, but it is done with the tacit approval of the legislative, and has always been funding shifted from related issues under serious to critical circumstances. But, in that money grab he claimed he was taking from defense appropriation to use in defense of the nation. It was also challenged in court, both in the 5th circuit in NOLA and the 9th circuit in San Francisco. The 5th circuit said he could do most of the spending of money appropriated for other departments and allowed the grab to stand. The 9th circuit said it was illegal and the majority opinion said:

    "The Department of Defense had relied on section 8005 of the Department of Defense Appropriations Act of 2019 to move the funds to the Department of Homeland Security.

    But the unauthorized use of those funds, the judges wrote, “violates the constitutional requirement that the Executive Branch not spend money absent an appropriation from Congress.”

    Also: “These funds were appropriated for other purposes, and the transfer amounted to ‘drawing funds from the Treasury without authorization by statute and thus violating the Appropriations Clause," the majority wrote. “Therefore, the transfer of funds here was unlawful.”

    This started with a transfer pf $2.5 billion from the DoD to DHS from 2018 appropriations, but even as the cases wound their way through the courts Trump planned a much larger $7.2 billion grab for this year.

    Because the 5th circuit allowed the construction to continue and the 9th circuit shut it down on constitutional grounds it will now have to be up to the SCOTUS to resolve the differences between the circuits.

    Now, we have Trump suddenly dictating Covid pandemic funding that both parties in congress have already rejected and the normal course would be pressure from the voting public would force the parties to come together and hammer out an agreement. What Trump just did was to void that principal in American governance with in excess of $100 billion in spending shifted from appropriations for other things. It says to the GOP in congress you never have to bother with compromise again, I will simply change appropriations to the way we want them. As well as delete tax laws we do not like. This action among other things dooms social security and medicare as well as ssi and other programs congress has enacted. But more important it strikes right at the heart of our government.

    The way I see it Trump did not just sign an executive order he signed the death warrant for the USA. It now remains to be seen if this will cause the eventual breakup of the country which is the course I am predicting as red and blue finally have no choice but to recognize irreconcilable differences and go through an acrimonious divorce and splitting of the assets. Such a divorce will be very difficult and it will be impossible for it not to lead to some fighting, whether or not we can keep that limited to a few skirmishes is debatable, it has the real chance of blowing up into a civil war, though the blue has centers of power and population while the red has almost none. So they will be limited to harassments. But, no matter how you think of the future possibility of a russia style break up, or the potential rise of city states, red and blue spheres of influence and alliances for mutual protection, the USA's fate was just sealed.

    I saw this 4 years ago when Trump "won." That the 2016 election was severely tampered with and it would only get worse, since the GOP blocked funds to guarantee the security of our elections it was then guaranteed they would be INSECURE, that we would never have a free and fair election again. So even as the polls indicate that Trump pretty much has no path to win in November barring a major historic turnaround he will soon call himself president for life just as Putin has. 22nd amendment gone, no more presidential term limits. 25th amendment gone, no more threat of a cabinet supplanting him with a VP. The minority party in government, a non issue as they now have zero power. The judiciary? Ask O'Kavanaugh, a far right wing bench that will always rule along partisan lines rather than uphold our constitution.

    So, if nothing else you all better realize you now have a dictator not a president, and it will be my duty to howl with laughter when that dictator no longer needs the support of the far fascist right that put him in power and aided and abetted his treason. Because soon enough he is going to come after you as well.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 4:30am

    VTGothic

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    You got me mounted on a favorite hobby horse, Les!

    So, the reason humans wiped out all the large animals as we migrated out of Africa and across Europe and the seas, is because early humans were naturally vegetarians? I don't think so.

     We have demonstrated that we can exist, in a state of compromised health, while consuming a highly processed, omnivore diet.

    Quite right and we can agree there. But: (1) non-meat food products are among the majority of "highly processed" foods; so one can be a vegan or vegetarian without forsaking processed foods. In fact, the effort to make vegetable-based "food" that looks and tastes like meat shows the opposite. And (I'm sure we'll agree) works against any notion of truly healthy (let alone sustainable) eating.

    (2) It is possible to eat a meat-centered diet without eating highly processed foods. I do it, every day. I have much better health and vitality nearly a decade, now, after switching from carbs to healthy animal fats for energy. Gone are my joint aches and chronic pains, unstable blood sugar (hence, unstable emotions), constant "empty gut" feeling, low vitality, elevated blood pressure, brain fog, and the beginnings of eczema.

    (3) Every time I raise the B-12 issue with vegetarians and vegans I am treated to a discourse on the availability of B-12 through concentrations of sea or land vegetables, consumed most often in pill form or through injections. That's fine, I suppose, for those who have an ethical objection to eating flesh and who live in a First World country where wealth and technology make it possible to collect natural sources of B-12 in bulk, transport them, extract and concentrate them, and distribute them for purchase. But that fits my understanding of "processed." It is also highly reliant on a fossil fuel economy that may not continue, and is subject to supply breakdowns and contamination. There, too, is the hidden carbon footprint.

    Or, alternatively, I'm informed about "careful" blending of natural foodstuffs that will provide adequate B-12, or (in one case) adequate equivalents. That works sustainably, I suppose, as long as one lives where the various carefully selected foodstuffs all grow in adequate ratios. It means a bad harvest year could be problematic. Two bad years could reduce one to eating animal fat.

    (4) Or, one can eat meat with its fat. Heck of a lot easier, far more reliable (because, if it comes to it, cows and sheep and chickens can be raised even on soil that won't sustain vegetable crops), and it can be done regeneratively: that is, in a way that builds or rebuilds soil health and vitality while raising highly-nutritious field-fed meat, milk, and egg animals for human consumption. Indeed, proper use of regenerative, integrated farming is actively reclaiming soil, and produces such nutrient-dense food that a person wants to consume less because less is required to meet one's satiation point.

    (5) I'm quite aware that there are at least some people who seem able to go decades on a vegetarian diet with no supplementation. (Or, at least, allegedly; I have doubts, but that's based on my inability to do so, so I'm invested, therefore I extend provisional credibility.) I truly think they are the vast minority of contemporary vegetarians. But I don't know of any studies that can support my suspicions (but I haven't looked). My suspicions are based on my limited grasp of biology and nutrition for humans, as well as the fact that at one point or another I've adhered to just about every diet advocated in the last 50 years, excluding veganism.

    I also understand that some people who fare poorly on a "highly processed, omnivore diet" find a vegetarian or vegan diet suits them better. Just as I know that some people fare poorly on strict vegetarian and vegan diets - especially if by striving to be "natural" about it they eschew supplemental vitamins and concentrated vegetarian/vegan foodstuffs. There's a lot of variation in humans; some of what we can and cannot get away with eating or not eating is likely hardwired from our particular ancestors, and some likely has to do with what we already have stored up in our own bodies.

    Some people wedded to the "meat and potatoes" standard American diet refuse to consider whether their food might contribute to their declining vitality and rising (well-known) comorbidities. Those who do, try to cut back on how much they eat, and sometimes try to incorporate more raw vegetables, but don't make substantive changes in the quality of the vegetables and meat, and don't dramatically reduce their processed carbohydrate consumption. Sometimes, they increase their snacking.

    Equally, some people wedded to the "vegetarian" or, even more so, to the "vegan" diet refuse to consider whether their diet might be the cause of their (less well-known) health and vitality issues. Those who do admit to their non-vegetarian/vegan needs often become compromise "vegetarians" who eat fish, or consume certain forms of dairy, or eggs. Really, they're just omnivores who don't admit it.

    Likewise, in my lexicon a vegetarian or vegan who receives manufactured supplementation via pill or injection is a self-denying omnivore - someone who needs animal consumption to meet their bodily needs but refuses to acknowledge it as long as they can secure concentrated plant-derived supplementation. That'll work until it doesn't. Then reality intrudes. For me, it's just not compatible with my "100 Year Survival Plan," which is built around what I can do on my own acreage.

    It's also clear that we Americans in particular (Westerners more generally) eat more food than is good for us - far too much of it in the "highly processed" category, and that's true regardless of preferred eating regimen - whatever one's "diet," there's an industry built around catering to one's ingredient preferences that pays no attention to what's left that's nutritious or harmful once the processing, packaging, and selling is done.

    Likewise, most Americans don't get enough exercise to realize the benefits that exercise provides. That's pathetic, but true. Eating without exercising sets one up for declining health, regardless of diet. Lack of exercise also promotes hunger, especially for quick energy foods - carbohydrates, which is just sugar (glucose) in the bloodstream; and there starts the negative feedback loop, whatever diet one follows.

    (6) The most traditional and wide-spread human eating pattern has always been omnivorous, where both meat and vegetables were what we would today call "heritage breed" and were raised by what we now call "organic" practices; and were produced by the people who consumed them, which is how humans historically got adequate daily exercise to maximize the digestion of that food. In the main, those of us who move back toward working land to produce our own food do so to our best health, and the land's best health, by integrating plant and animal life, and by eating what we grow on our increasingly healthy soil with its rich and diverse microbial life - thereby also rebuilding our own gut biomes with the local microbes our bodies rely upon to process the food we grow.

    Turns out those microbes are also essential sources of DNA: fully half the DNA our bodies use to operate our organs at full potential are resident in the beneficial symbiotic microbial life living within our bodies - which come from the plant and animal food we harvest locally. Really makes me wonder whether the land hasn't colonized us every bit as much as we it. But it also points out why the traditional way of cooking - slow, with moisture, over low heat - is better for our health and vitality than fast, high-heat, dry cooking - and why naturally fermented vegetables and dairy contribute to healthy guts and improved vitality.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 5:08am

    #22
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Dung

    My farm needs it, my fields and orchards, gardens and forests. Animals are necessary and their inevitable end feeds me too.

    husband,father,farmer,optometrist

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 6:20am

    LesPhelps

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: Apr 30 2009

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    Meat Centered Diet

    I agree about processed foods, regardless of meat or plant sourced.

    (2) It is possible to eat a meat-centered diet without eating highly processed foods. I do it, every day.

    Everything comes from plants.  When you have animals eat the plants and then eat the animal, you loose micronutrients and antioxidants and gain dietary cholesterol, trans fats and animal protein.

    If you are inquisitive, check out research on the correlation between animal protein and cancer.  A lot of research has been done on this over the last few decades.  WHO’s website has tables and charts that show cancer rates in wealthier nations 400% higher than poorer parts of the world.  It appears that animal protein is a great growth medium for cancer cells.

    There are poor parts of the world where cardiovascular disease if virtually nonexistent, where blood pressure goes down as you age.

    It’s easy to rationalize the way you want to eat.  Believe me, I know.  I did it for years.

    The really cool thing I found, is once I dumped meat, dairy and processed foods for a period of time, I started enjoying eating healthy foods.  I leave the table as satisfied as before.

    The caveat it this.  As tasty and enjoyable as healthy foods are, they don’t pack the culinary wallop that addictive foods do.  You can enjoyably give up food addictions, but you don’t forget why you were addicted.

    BTW, my annual checkups are not the same.  I am healthier across the board.  For example, my untreated, combined cholesterol last year was 128.  Studies indicate that people who keep their cholesterol under 150 don’t have heart attacks strokes and other cardiovascular issues, despite their history.  Angiograms for some of these people show significant reversal of existing CVD.

    There is a lot of nutritional science available for those interested.  The problem is the background noise.  It’s like the early sixties and the tobacco industry.

    The problems are this.  The meat and dairy farming and food manufacturing industries have much deeper pockets than the tobacco industry had.  That and the addiction rate for the Western Diet is near 100%.  My recollection is that nicotine addiction peaked at around 50% for men, so there was opposition.  The Western diet is sanctioned, subsidized and approved of by virtually everyone in todays society.

    I’m not sure this will ever go away.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 7:54am

    #24
    tbp

    tbp

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    False ideas about health

    @pokjbv
    I saw this 4 years ago when Trump "won." That the 2016 election was severely tampered with and it would only get worse, since the GOP blocked funds to guarantee the security of our elections it was then guaranteed they would be INSECURE, that we would never have a free and fair election again. So even as the polls indicate that Trump pretty much has no path to win in November barring a major historic turnaround he will soon call himself president for life just as Putin has. 22nd amendment gone, no more presidential term limits. 25th amendment gone, no more threat of a cabinet supplanting him with a VP. The minority party in government, a non issue as they now have zero power. The judiciary? Ask O'Kavanaugh, a far right wing bench that will always rule along partisan lines rather than uphold our constitution.

    So, if nothing else you all better realize you now have a dictator not a president, and it will be my duty to howl with laughter when that dictator no longer needs the support of the far fascist right that put him in power and aided and abetted his treason. Because soon enough he is going to come after you as well.

    Damn, sir, turn off the TV. At least turn off the criminal CIA quadrumvirate CNN/MSNBC/WaPo/NYT. 100% of what you said is 100% insane lies.

    @VTGothic
    Likewise, in my lexicon a vegetarian or vegan who receives manufactured supplementation via pill or injection is a self-denying omnivore - someone who needs animal consumption to meet their bodily needs but refuses to acknowledge it as long as they can secure concentrated plant-derived supplementation. That'll work until it doesn't. Then reality intrudes. For me, it's just not compatible with my "100 Year Survival Plan," which is built around what I can do on my own acreage.

    You're totally right about everything you wrote IMO, except that many of our soils have been largely depleted of nutrients, which is why supplementation can become quite necessary. A major example is magnesium. Vitamin A tends to be found only in expensive foods (and most people can't efficiently convert beta-carotene to usable vitamin A). In India, there's a major iodine deficiency problem. Our modern food patterns also skew omega-3 (antiinflammatory and pro-intelligence) to omega-6 (proinflammatory and pro-visceral fat storage) fatty acids ratio, causing all sorts of problems, making DHA/EPA supplementation extremely useful.

    @LesPhelps
    Everything comes from plants. When you have animals eat the plants and then eat the animal, you loose micronutrients and antioxidants and gain dietary cholesterol, trans fats and animal protein.

    Cholesterol is fine and necessary. Trans fats only happen if you overcook or cook with toxic plant oils (with the important exception of coconut oil).

    If you are inquisitive, check out research on the correlation between animal protein and cancer. A lot of research has been done on this over the last few decades. WHO’s website has tables and charts that show cancer rates in wealthier nations 400% higher than poorer parts of the world. It appears that animal protein is a great growth medium for cancer cells.

    Nah, it's not the protein that causes cancer, it's the toxins in non-organic meat which the alleged "health authorities" (controlled by the pharma/food industry) do not acknowledge.

    The really cool thing I found, is once I dumped meat, dairy and processed foods for a period of time, I started enjoying eating healthy foods. I leave the table as satisfied as before.

    Don't let crime gangs define for you what "healthy" means. I recommend you subscribe to Dr. Mercola's newsletter to (slowly over time at a nice pace) learn the truth and take control of your own health. You're right about processed foods, and just quitting those will have a huge positive effect on your health, but going by what you're saying you think you know about health right now, it'll be easy for you to degrade your health over time.

    BTW, my annual checkups are not the same. I am healthier across the board. For example, my untreated, combined cholesterol last year was 128. Studies indicate that people who keep their cholesterol under 150 don’t have heart attacks strokes and other cardiovascular issues, despite their history. Angiograms for some of these people show significant reversal of existing CVD.

    That's all BS. You've fallen for the cholesterol scam. Watch this:

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 7:57am

    #25
    Mohammed Mast

    Mohammed Mast

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    Baba Hari Dass

    Baba Hari Dass when asked whether it was more spiritual to eat meat or be a vegetarian said ( actually spelled out on a chalk board since he was silent) " Rules about eating are present when food is plentiful. When food is scarce you will eat anything"

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 8:05am

    Mohammed Mast

    Mohammed Mast

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    pokjbv

    This site is and has been studiously APOLITICAL.

    It has been that way for exceedingly good reason. Political discussions go nowhere. They are nothing if not divisive. They are not related to the three E's.

    So I think it would be appreciated if you would not post either pro or con political opinions.

    BTW my political stance is "there are no political solutions to the human condition"

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 8:11am

    #27
    2retired

    2retired

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    hobby horses

    As peoples memories of (elderly) farming ancestors fade, so does the accuracy of  memory of their diets and activity. Long bones in humans used to have growth lines (like trees) marking periods of food scarcity and privation. In modern times the glut of available calories, and its "manufacture" (without the toil) is what is different. I think meat (on the hoof) can be thought of a source of preserved calories, as preservation of food for times of scarcity has over time been one of the main hurdles for survival. Few people remember the role of root cellars, salting, fermenting, foraging, and animal husbandry. I have a 3 volume(!) encyclopedia, all that was known in Arts, Science, and Technology, published in 1806, it amazing to occasionally look at what basic stuff, is invisible to most.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 9:19am

    VTGothic

    VTGothic

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    I agree with all you wrote...thanks

    @tbp: I do understand the poor soil => supplementation. My comment's specific context was the ongoing "discussion" with vegetarians and vegans about the need for B12.

    In the larger context: imo, the degradation of soil is a top-tier reason for embracing regenerative agriculture. Time to get our soils in shape and learn healthy processes so we don't need to rely on supplements that might not always be available - and that are only available because of resources extracted somewhere else.

    Meanwhile, however, I am currently taking (these last 5 months) Chris' recommended half dozen supplements to doubly assure my immune system is "covid-ready," since supplements are still available.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 9:42am

    VeganDB12

    VeganDB12

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    b12

    Sometimes reality trumps ideology. The large majority of vegetarians and almost all vegans are b12 deficient if they don't supplement through fortified foods or supplements. Omnivores can develop other deficiencies (which is why we have folate fortified foods to prevent spina bifida, iodine in our salt, etc...).  I know a good diet replaces these things but the fortifications help those who don't know better. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2933506/

    Cholesterol can be harmful to some people, others tolerate it well, we are a genetic rainbow of different physiologies.  Monitoring and assessing how we feel on our diets is important but not everyone can afford a good dietician and must find their way.  I hammer on the B12 with my veggie friends and cohorts it is cheap simple and prevents a lot of problems. The question as to what would you eat if you were starving is a little off base, no one here is starving. It is a choice for most of us in the first world, and my omnivore friends are always envious that my meals are so much cheaper than theirs FWIW.

     

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 9:55am

    VTGothic

    VTGothic

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    Yes!...

    A couple of the things I think about as I adopt many of those old practices:

    Salting and brining require bulk non-iodized salt. Not so easy to get, now.

    Likewise, slaked lime for preserving fresh eggs. I think I've finally found a nearby source. If so, I'm going to try it, as I have more eggs than I can eat, and I'd as soon preserve some as sell them all, for the slow period of the year when the hens shut down their egg conveyor belts.

    I'm also in awe of the old practice of butchering a chicken the day of preparing it for dinner. That's a lot of additional work! Especially when done by hand without the aid of an electric thermostat-regulated water bath and electric plucker. Yet, when the SHTF, as you correctly say, animals are preserved calories (and other nutrients).

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 10:03am

    VeganDB12

    VeganDB12

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    VeganDB12 said:

    ...and my 25 pound bag of lentils provides me concentrated preserved protein for 4 months...sorry I had to add that. Omnivore vegetarian vegan is a choice.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 10:17am

    Mysterymet

    Mysterymet

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    Genetic components of cholesterol

    All this talk about diets ignores the genetic component and other interesting things about cholesterol. I like meat and I will keep eating it. I can eat fried foods all week and it does nothing to my cholesterol. I have a friend from work how is on a super restrictive diet to bring his down but it is still sky high.

    https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/familial-hypercholesterolemia

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5421439/

    also, to people who think that Trump’s executive orders are highly illegal, did you think Obama’s DACA was highly illegal too? I can’t say that I agree with either of them but many democrats think it is OK when their guy does it but not when the other guy does it. Heck they even fight against Trump making an executive order to counteract Obama’s illegal executive order. Personally I would prohibit ALL executive orders on things that should be covered by legislation. Unfortunately, our congress is extremely dysfunctional.  If I thought the libertarians stood a chance I’d vote for them but that is not to be. So, I am forced to vote for Trump because I’d rather have crony capitalism than socialism/communism.

     

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 10:29am

    Pipyman

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    Thanks

    For taking the time to do that; I couldn’t bring myself to go over the same ground again with another Vegan.  Eat well, not “right” is what I live by.

    I am both impressed and frustrated with Lesphelps’ ability to bring every line of discussion back to veganism. It strikes me as a deeply held belief, with little effort to examine the other side. I know the other side is controversial (for some reason), but that’s what we do here isn’t it?

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 11:25am

    #34
    Shplad

    Shplad

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    Greed vs. inflation

    I'm not trying to be nasty here, just trying to understand something. I generally agree with most of Chris and Adam's content, otherwise I wouldn't be here. My knowledge of economics is minimal.

    However, sometimes, PP's videos/content make it sound like money printing by the central banks is the only large source of inflation. I know increasing wages/salaries are often seen as a sign of inflation, but don't we have to factor in just those workers' pure greed in that calculus? I live in a bit city and when a tradesmen comes to my door and wants 3x what's reasonble for doing work, I send him on his way. But many people hire him. Then they complain tradespeople charge way too much.  The economics of my city are very expensive, but not so expensive as to warrant that tradesman's price demands.

    Sure, most haven't been able to increase their employment earnings that much the last 30 or 40 years, but some have, and I don't think that's entirely due to devaluation of the dollar. I'm asking this just to try to get a balanced perspective.

     

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 11:28am

    #35
    Penguin Will

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    Penguin Will said:

    Lots of arguments over vegan versus, well everything else. 🙂

    I've seen cases made that eating meat is bad for the environment. And I've seen others say that it's not. Or that it doesn't include pasture fed beef... whatever. Eat what you like, no worries.

    But there is a point worth mentioning I think. Whenever someone says something is more "efficient" or something of the like, I always wonder "In terms of what?" In terms of how much energy you as a homesteader expend versus how much return we get on that investment livestock is a winner and it's not even close. There's a reason none of the homesteaders that settled this country were vegan by choice. There's a reason stealing livestock was a hanging offense in many parts of the frontier. Vegetarianism is, for the most part, a luxury granted by fossil fuels. Historically if you were a homesteader and you had the resources to run stock you did so and no questions asked.

    And while you attended to other important matters your beef/pork/poultry was munching on grass and other free food and turning it into calories. Same for orchards, if you had room you had one if you were smart. Gardens are great but they are a ton of work and almost guaranteed to produce a less optimum outcome compared to a more well rounded calorie menu. IF you are trying to make a living off the land that is.

    Will

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 11:44am

    #36
    robie robinson

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    Back to dung

    We have mineraled our draft and grazing minerals with expensive (big carbon footprint) kelp meal for so many years and their urine and dung spread through out our farm and garden. We have only used kosher salt for 30+yrs. my partner, a scotch Irish girl of 60, has perfect thyroid and blood lipid profile, I used her as an anecdote as her genetic variant is most prone to thyroid issues. I do not need fertilizer, and for the rest of my life my animals will continue to amend soils with their excrement and offal.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 12:10pm

    #37

    000

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    The More Things Change The More They Stay the Same

    Author Thomas Frank joins the show to discuss his latest book ‘The People, NO: A Brief History of Anti-Populism.’

    If you're interested in history and how it might rhyme and/or "turn" [sic] you will find Thomas Franks recounting of the 1890's facinating.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 12:12pm

    jturbo68

    Status: Bronze Member

    Joined: Aug 04 2009

    Posts: 120

    Kelp & Salt

    Ive been using free choice enterprises minerals on my cows for years, but have heard about Kelp and Salt ... maybe from PolyFace.

    Is that all you use?  Where do you purchase in bulk?

     

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 12:47pm

    Pipyman

    Status: Member

    Joined: Apr 24 2011

    Posts: 109

    5+

    Hallelujah

    And just in case someone thinks I have an issue with eating vegetables, this was my garden’s offerings yesterday. And thank you to my beautiful rabbits for eating my excess and feeding me as thanks.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 2:16pm

    cicerone

    cicerone

    Status: Member

    Joined: Sep 22 2019

    Posts: 25

    1+

    Places to move in the Bay Area. Or Oregon.

    @Girlflower,

    I live in San Mateo County. I grow what I can in raised beds but have similar thoughts these days. Here's my two cents based on my research:

    Sonoma County is great if you can afford it. I grew up there. The flat areas near riverbeds (Russian River, Laguna de Santa Rosa) are the most fertile. I'm aware that Adam Taggart lives up there somewhere, probably for good reason. It'd be my first choice.

    The Central Valley is far cheaper, and the soil is deep, but it gets so darn hot in the summer. I've scouted around Clarksburg, Lodi and the Delta more generally. Avoid Stockton because of crime. You also want to have at least some "Delta breeze" because it gets desert-like very quickly outside of that influence.

    I'm very familiar with Oregon as my folks retired near Salem. It's my de-facto multi-generational BOL. The soil is beautiful and the climate is mild. Everything my dad grows... just grows. It's pretty affordable and unlike Portland, the politics are moderate. The downsides are well known: gloomy, gray, and boring. The job market is middling at best, but that's Oregon in general.

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 3:07pm

    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status: Gold Member

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 1052

    2+

    Kelp and Redmonds

     

    for years we have used,,, https://www.newcountryorganics.com,,,as our supply of minerals. I have never bought feed from them,names have changed often,as I don’t use feed, uhuh, even for my ducks and chickens. They free range and I exercise discipline when my Border Collie interferes. If you need an outside input,,,,you aren’t sustainable. My only necessary input is diesel fuel, which I am in the weaning phase, and beer. I drink more than I can ferment and distill, and am working on that.

    We are in process of selling some timber which will free up capital for fence work. We have several hundred acres of high tensile is imminent.

    lover of all things involving husbandry,

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  • Sun, Aug 09, 2020 - 6:04pm

    Mohammed Mast

    Mohammed Mast

    Status: Silver Member

    Joined: May 17 2017

    Posts: 739

    6+

    Balance

    i can help you out in your search for balance. As you said your knowledge of economics is minimal. So let's start here ; there are basically 2 economic systems in the US. There is capitalism and there is socialism. Tradesmen are capitalists. Bankers, hedges funds, and a whole lot of corporations function in a socialist economy. Tradesmen can suffer losses whereas the socialists don't. Trades people pay the same as everyone for everything they purchase.

    As a trades person myself I find it humorous that after a lifetime honing my craft someone would doubt whether I earn what I charge. But I function in a capitalist system which means it is market driven. It also means negotiation is possible.

    When someone asks if I can do any better on the price my first answer is " well let me see. What was the price? $50 k ?  Yeah I can do better , how about $60k?"

    Or another option is well you can always go to the big box store buy a do it yourself book and have at it. Or if I am feeling compassionate I might say "well I understand you can;t afford me but I am sure you can find someone to do it for less"

    Here is a quote which I think is applicable "

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey."
    It is just a shame that Amerika is now a Walmart nation and the results are plain to see

     

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