Investing in Precious Metals 101 Ad
  • Blog
    weight loss goals Ollyy/Shutterstock

    How To Lose Weight

    Adam's first-hand experience
    by Adam Taggart

    Friday, February 1, 2019, 11:05 AM

Happy New Year’s Day!

If you’re like most people around the world, you’re spending time today planning your resolutions for the coming year.

And if you’re like most people, ‘losing weight’ is probably on your list.

Most of us carry more inches around the middle than we’d ideally like. And, as Charles Hugh Smith recently laid out in his latest report, we worry about the long-term health risks that can come with being overweight.

Yet most New Year’s weight loss attempts meet with failure, usually after only a few weeks. The truth is: dropping unwanted pounds and keeping them off is hard.

BUT….it’s doable. In fact, the pathway to achieve a healthy bodyweight is surprisingly straightforward. It just requires disciplined commitment. Weight loss programs overwhelmingly fail because of psychological reasons or misinformation. If you pick a program based on good science — and keep your mind right while pursuing it — positive results are inevitable.

In this article, I’m going to recount my own experience (with evidence for you to judge) with finally losing the pounds that had for years stubbornly refused to leave my middle. The keys to my success weren’t complicated nor expensive. And I firmly believe that anyone, regardless of age or situation, can deploy them to similar results.

Weight Loss Is All About Nutrition

As the title of this section states, losing weight has everything to do with diet.

Yes, following an active fitness regime is a very important complement (and essential for general health). But as I’ll soon show, exercise alone is not effective for material weight loss.

The hard truth is that if you want to lose weight, especially to the point where it will be visibly noticeable, diet is going to be 80% to 90% of the work involved.

Now, that may sound like a downer. No one likes the idea of being on a “diet plan”. But I encourage you to look at it from another point of view. This is actually really good news. There are few things you have more control over than what and how much you put in your mouth. You have the agency here. You don’t have to rely on anyone else; you don’t have to wait to be chosen; you don’t have to pass any test to participate — you have full power to chart your own destiny here.

And you’ll find that a weight-loss diet doesn’t equate to deprivation and suffering. I’ll talk more about this in a moment, but eating healthier often means eating tastier, more satisfying meals. And it can frequently — and non-intuitively — mean eating more, not less.

The point here is: Try to put aside your dread. It’s not going to help you, and much of what you’re fearing is likely wrong.

What to Eat to Lose Weight

An important note: I’m going to explain here the kind of diet that I followed to lose weight, because it worked. It worked for me, and I’ve seen it work for dozens of other folks I know who have followed it. I’ve personally witnessed the transforming results.

What I’m not saying is that this is the only diet for losing weight effectively. Or the best one. There are a number of other plans that are worth consideration. But I know for sure this one works, which gives me the confidence to share it with you.

So, do you have to follow some complicated program made up of pricey powdered shakes or arcane ingredients like panda spleen? No. Not at all.

The simple mnemonic to keep in mind is: the closer to its natural state, the better the food likely is for you.

As gross as this may sound, if it can go rancid within a few days = good. If it can live in your pantry for months (because it’s filled with preservatives) = not so good.

You want to eat foods that supply the natural building blocks your body needs to function well: notably protein, saturated fats, fiber, quality carbohydrates, and anti-oxidants.

And you want to minimize the intake of processed foods that trigger your body’s insulin response. The worst offenders are refined flours (found in most processed carbohydrates) and refined sugars (found in almost everything).

It’s the insulin response that sabotages the efficacy of most diets. When we eat sugars or foods that easily break down into sugars (most carbohydrates), our bodies use these sugars for immediate energy and store any excess sugar along with everything else we’ve eaten into our muscle and fat cells for use later. Not only that, but as our insulin levels begin to normalize after a sugary meal, a craving for additional sugar occurs which often leads to overeating of unhealthy foods. To add insult to injury, eating sugars/carbs encourages your body to retain water — leading to additional weight gain.

So, what to eat? I find the guidance offered by Mark Sisson’s Primal Blueprint diet (quite similar to the Paleo and Zone diets) very useful. I highly recommend using his book The Primal Blueprint Cookbook for meal planning, but the chart below offers an easy-to-understand framework for where to place your focus:

food chart for weight loss

(click on the image for an expanded view)

Animal protein plays a big role in the Primal/Paleo/Zone diets, especially for those engaged in concurrent strength-training. Note the focus on pasture-raised, grass-fed, organic, wild-catch and local sources. Similar to humans, the animals we eat are as healthy as their diets. If animals we eat were not nourished well, how can expect their meat to nourish us any better?

This focus on meat does not mean that vegetarianism and veganism are to be eschewed. There is much evidence for the benefits of plant-based diets — though those on them do need to pay more attention to ensuring they consume enough protein during the day for healthy body function.

How Much Should I Eat to Lose Weight?

It’s tempting to view losing weight as simple math: that to lose weight you just need to eat fewer calories than you burn off.

While that is not necessarily untrue, it can lead to unhealthy decision-making.

It’s important to realize that all calories are not created equal. Intake of “good” calories can actually catalyze weight loss, and conversely, “bad” calories will trigger weight gain.

As for bad calories, the big baddy to watch out for is processed carbs (sugars, grains, etc). Anything that spikes insulin production. The Primal Blueprint program encourages us to consume less than 150 grams of *any* kind of carbs per day:

graph of carbohydrates and weight loss

(click on the image for an expanded view)

Now, if you’re like me, you’re challenged to think of your food serving sizes in terms of grams. Not to worry.

There are apps out there now that do all the thinking for us. I use MyFitnessPal. You simply type in the food you’re about to eat, and it offers you a selection of serving sizes to choose from. Pick one, and all of a sudden the app can tell you how many grams of carbs/fat/protein/etc it has. The app will help you set targets for your daily food intake and track your progress during the day to let you know how little (or how much) you have left in your eating budget. It’s a great way to quickly and easily get an exact answer to the question: How much should I eat today?

And there are days where I find it challenging to consume all the app tells me I’m supposed to, especially protein. If anything, there are more days where I feel like I’m eating more than I’d rather vs days where I want to eat more. And this is coming from a guy who really enjoys food.

On top of that, eating such a well-balanced, low-insulin-producing diet is much more sating. Without the swings in blood sugar, hunger cravings nearly disappear. Whereas my eating schedule used to be dictated by how aggressively my stomach demanded to be filled (which I would often try to appease through snacking between meals), now I eat by the clock. It’s not uncommon for me to forget about a meal if I get busy with a project, because my stomach rarely reminds me the way it used to.

Key Success Factors for Weight Loss

So, I’ve mentioned several times that this eating approach worked for me. Where’s the proof?

The photos below show the before and after.

The “before” photo at left was taken earlier in 2015. At this point, I’d been doing CrossFit for about 6 months — nearly every day. Leading up to that, I had an active regimen of running, tennis and daily push-ups/sit-ups. In the years prior, I’d run marathons and even a half-Ironman triathlon. The point is, my activity level was quite high and I would claim my fitness level (strength, endurance, etc) was well above average. Yet despite that, I had about 15 pounds I could never seem to fully shake. Exercise alone was simply not enough.

The “after” picture at right was taken approximately 6 months later. My fitness regimen intensity remained the same throughout, as did my general physical performance. But you’ll see how the diet plan allowed me to shed those stubborn pounds. It’s not that my body became any more defined during that period, it’s that the weight hiding it melted off enough to show what was underneath:

Adam's weight loss before and after pictures

My Top Steps for Losing Weight

If you’re looking to lose weight this year — in a healthy way — here are the top steps I would advise taking, based on my own experience:

  • Stop eating refined sugars and processed carbs — This is the single biggest step to take. Ridding your diet of sugary foods is challenging (because sugar is added to nearly everything), but most of us can live without the worst offenders like sodas and desserts. It’s the grains that were the hardest for me to give up. Breads, pastas, cereals — they taste good, have great mouth feel, and are everywhere in the American diet. But as we’ve discussed on this site in numerous podcasts, they not only promote weight gain, but they trigger inflammation which fosters joint degradation and cardiovascular disease. If you have yet to rid your diet of sugars/grains and you start doing so now, you’ll likely see notable weight loss within 2 weeks from this one step alone.
  • Cut down your dairy and alcohol intake — You don’t have to go to zero, but consume these sparingly. Most of us realize the dangers of too much alcohol, but here’s a quick summary of why dairy should be limited in a human adult diet.
  • Eat whole foods — In a nutshell, that’s meats and vegetables, nuts and seeds, some fruits, little starch and no sugar. The literature on nutrition these days is vast, and can be a little overwhelming for the uninitiated — but the Primal Blueprint infographics shared above tell you most of what you need to know. Good resources for expanding your nutritional knowledge are our diet-related podcasts with Robb WolfMark Sisson and David Seaman. Nutritional programs worth investigating are the PaleoPrimal and Zone diets. It sure won’t hurt to consult with a professional nutritionist to discuss your personal health situation and goals.
  • Track everything you eat during the day — This is called ‘keeping a food diary’. The logic is that recording what you eat makes you much more mindful of what you decide to put in your mouth. This actually works. It forces you to ask yourself: Do I really need/want that? Tracking also helps you monitor how much you’ve consumed through the day, so that you’re in much less danger of mindlessly overeating. You can use a standard notebook as a journal, but I prefer using an app like MyFitnessPal, which I mentioned earlier. It makes it dead easy to not only track your food intake, but to know what type of food (protein, fat, carbs, etc) you have left still to eat in the day vs what you’ve already hit your daily limit on.
  • Prepare your own meals whenever possible — Making your own meals has many benefits. First off, it’s cheaper than buying prepared food. It also helps you develop a sense for “building a meal” based on its nutrients — you’re choosing foods that will complement each other not just by taste, but also by fuel type. I highly recommend preparing multiple meals at once to eat later in the week, which will minimize the risk of making bad food choices in the moment, because you have smart options at the ready.
  • Eat a light, early dinner — Willpower acts very much as a muscle does. It gets stronger the more it gets exercised. But it also tires throughout the day, which is why most “bad” eating happens at night, when our mental resolve is sapped. Americans often eat 50% or more of their calories late in the day, going to bed on a full stomach that spends all night figuring out how to store the mass of food just ingested. You should aspire to the opposite. Eat the majority of your calories in the first half of the day while you’re active and need energy, and let your digestive system shut down at bedtime without burden. Personally, I found that switching to a light dinner, or sometimes skipping dinner entirely, had one of the biggest impacts on dropping my weight.
  • Recruit a support system — This is a big one. Studies show that the #1 success factor most correlated with weight loss, particularly weight loss that is maintained once achieved, is the presence of a good support system. If possible, find a few friends who are willing to commit to losing weight along with you. Having people who can commiserate during the tough days, who encourage you when your willpower is wavering and praise you as you make progress, is a HUGE advantage in remaining committed to your diet plan. MyFitnessPal helps with this, allowing you and your friends to track each others’ eating habits and offer encouragement. In addition to friends, make sure your family is aware of your goals and has your back. You not only want their emotional support, but you want to make sure that the food choices at your dining table won’t be working against your interests.
  • Stop using food as a reward or a social centerpiece — For many of us, food is more than simply fuel; it’s an emotional crutch. We turn to certain meals to reward ourselves, or make us feel better when we’re depressed. Food is often used as the reason for gathering together socially. This kind of non-essential eating is so wired into our psyches that it’s hard to escape. But it doesn’t have to be that way — we can replace food’s non-nutritive role with other substitutes. Oftentimes, eating can be replaced by another activity without any loss of social enjoyment or self-soothing. Instead of that big group Sunday brunch, why not invite everyone on a hike? Bring along a picnic of sensible foods and leave the Belgian waffles behind. With a little practice, you’ll find plenty of ways to exchange unneeded calories for memory-making experiences.
  • Weigh yourself/take measurements regularly — As they say in business, “if it doesn’t get measured, it doesn’t get moved”. Take a before photo. Record your weight each week. As you begin to see results, you’ll be inspired to commit further to the program to protect the progress you’ve made. And if you’re not seeing progress after a few weeks, there’s likely a flaw in your approach. Take an honest hard look at your behavior — are you following all of the steps above, without sabotaging yourself anywhere? If you really believe you are, then consult a nutritionist or a physician — they can help assess the situation, or determine if a larger health issue may be at play.
  • Replace your clothes as you lose weight — As you lose inches around your waist, invest in new clothes. Not only will they make your progress more visible, but they’ll serve as an “early detection system” to warn you if you start lapsing in your eating behavior. Myself, I’ve dropped from a size 36 waist to a 33. If my new pants ever start feeling tight, it’s an immediate signal to me to pay more attention to my food habits. Usually within a day or two of mindful focus, the tightness recedes. If I were wearing my old pants, I’m sure I’d mindlessly loosen my belt one more notch and not notice the reversion until I’d packed on several more pounds.
  • Don’t let perfect be the enemy of ‘good enough’ — Keep in mind that Rome wasn’t built in a day. Nor will your new body. The process you’re undertaking needs to be sustainable. It shouldn’t feel like a death-march, nor an “all or nothing” venture. You will make mistakes. You will have set-backs. You will be at birthday parties where it’s expected you’ll have a bite of cake, or raise a glass in toast. Build in an expectation of and tolerance for these eventualities and don’t let them derail your commitment to progress. The objective is to move forward more than you move back. If you do, you’ll lose the weight over time, in a natural-feeling procession that will be manageable to maintain.

That’s it. If you can follow the steps above with discipline, the weight will come off.

Of course, your progress will be materially helped by concurrently engaging in:

  • a fitness regime (especially focused on constantly varied functional movement at relatively high intensity)
  • stress management
  • practicing good sleep hygiene

all topics we’ve discussed previously here at Peak Prosperity, and plan to bring you further insights on in the year to come.

For those of you with New Year’s weight loss resolutions: good luck! Please consider us and the PP.com readership as part of your support community — let us know how you’re doing and lean on us for any insights and encouragement you may need in your journey.

Happy New Year!!

~ Adam Taggart

Related content
» More

87 Comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 5:45pm

    #1
    Uncletommy

    Uncletommy

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 03 2014

    Posts: 529

    Grow what you eat

    If you live in a house with central heat and have a window that faces somewhat south, you can start small and work your way up to a local, healthy diet with a minimum of work. Not only will you save money and achieve the results that Adam has, you will begin the journey to understanding what it means to be connected to your food. 

    You know those green onions that you tend to discard after you've removed the tops? Get yourself a flower pot and stick the bottom portion in a bit of potting soil and place them on the window still. Voila, instant garden. How about a few lettuce seeds in a pot in another window spot? Yup, that works too.

    While I don't presume to think I will provide all the food my wife and I will need over the course of the winter, I do believe that if everyone of you reading this, began starting something on this scale, you would discover that "Resilience" isn't just a web page at PP. If you're worried about the floods in Britain, tornadoes in Texas, floods in Paraguay and general climate change, this might be the kick in the pants we all need to actually start doing something about it. You might just discover a passion you never knew you had. Bon appetite and Happy New Year.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 6:54pm

    #2

    pinecarr

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2008

    Posts: 1091

    Re beans and legumes

    Adam or others-

        Why are beans and legumes not included in the Paleo diet (if I have that right)?  Is it because they are higher in carbs?  And/or because they were not part of earlier mans' diet?  I guess the fact that they are not included kind of bums me out from a sustainability perspective; one of the few things I have been very successful at growing, and that has the potential to provide a good source of calories in case we need to become self-sufficient, have been several varieties of beans that  can be dried/saved.  Of course, if TSHTF to the point where we need to subsist off of our gardens, I guess stretching the rules on the Paleo diet will be the least of my worries.  But I'd be curious to hear yours and others thoughts on this, as it does speak to one potential supporting-beam in our framework for sustainable food sources.

       Thanks!

    Edit: Here's one reference I just found that is relevant to this discussion: http://chriskresser.com/are-legumes-paleo/

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 7:27pm

    #3

    Adam Taggart

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2653

    1+

    Auto-immune response triggers

    Pinecarr —

    Legumes and beans are generally avoided largely for two reasons:

    • Their protein structure is somewhat toxic and triggers the body's autoimmune response. Over prolonged consumption this can lead to inflammation, leaky gut issues, protease inhibition, and autoimmune disease.
    • Their nutrient content is not as high as the other foods contained in the Primal Blueprint pyramid above (in fact, beans and legumes contain so-called 'anti-nutrients'). So the benefits from eating legumes are usually overwhelmed by their shortcomings.

    Here's an in-depth article on the topic by Loren Cordain, developer of the Paleo Diet. And another that explains the same in more layman terms.

    The Cordain piece includes his rebuttal to Chris Kresser's 'softer' stance on legumes, which is based on a "if your body can tolerate them, they're not too bad for you" outlook. The Cordain/Kresser debate shows that there is room in the paleo framework for "grey areas" for science to argue over. But even Kresser himself takes care to point out that he is "not a big advocate" of legumes. 

    Sorry to bear the news that one of the easier foods to store/grow isn't as nutritious as we'd like. That said, I wouldn't treat beans/legumes as poison. Given their storability, I'd continue to include them in emergency rations. If it came down to eating beans or not during a crisis, I'd for sure eat the beans! 

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 9:44pm

    Reply to #3
    jandeligans

    jandeligans

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 21 2011

    Posts: 27

    1+

    Beans are good for longevity study shows

    With all due respect Adam, I applaud your weight loss and attention to nutrition. However, I find the Paleo Diet to be not very scientific. Personally, although it works for weight loss since you are cutting out the refined sugars, I think it is mainly a fad that won't last long. And the world cannot really supply meat to everyone as the bulk of your calories without completely destroying the ecosystem. The essay by Loren Cordain contains lots of big buzz words but not much that convinces me that he has proven what he is saying scientifically. For example, calling any food that contains phytates as "toxic" is popular these days in some groups but is not accurate.

    Here is a quote from Andrew Weil:  "Phytates (and phytic acid) are antioxidant compounds found in whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds. The chief concern about phytates is that they can bind to certain dietary minerals including iron, zinc, manganese and, to a lesser extent calcium, and slow their absorption. However, the presence of phytates in foods really isn't the worry that some individuals believe it to be. (I've been asked in the past about the phytates in soy and whether they hinder mineral absorption. There is no scientific data suggesting that eating whole soy foods leads to mineral deficiencies in humans)

    You also should be aware that phytates themselves have some health benefits, including anti-inflammatory effects. In laboratory research, phytates have helped normalize cell growth and stopped the proliferation of cancer cells. They also may help prevent cardiovascular disease and lower a food's glycemic load." -Andrew Weil

    And here's a recent study of multiple cultures and people who achieve extreme longevity. They studied what were the common factors and guess what? Bean eating was one of the constants. The longest lived people of all the various world's diets includes daily consumption of beans and always low amounts of meat – the opposite of the Paleo Diet. Hmmm….

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/04/11/398325030/eating-to-break-100-longevity-diet-tips-from-the-blue-zones

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 10:02pm

    Reply to #3

    pinecarr

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2008

    Posts: 1091

    Thanks for your response, Adam!

    I appreciate the reference to Loren Cordain's article discussing legumes and beans (in relation to the Paleo Diet), and his rebuttal to Chris Kresser's softer stance on them.  I gave them a quick read, but will need to read them more thoroughly when I have a few more neurons firing. 

    From a practical standpoint, I will probably have to retain beans as a renewable aspect of my food sustainability, for now; at least until I am able to establish a viable alternative, like raising livestock and poultry.

    Thanks again for your quick and informative response, Adam! 

    Edit: Jandeligans, thanks also for your contribution to this discussion.  Interesting!

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 10:12pm

    #4

    Arthur Robey

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 03 2010

    Posts: 1814

    1+

    Beans

    Beans are central to my plans of gaining my freedom by decreasing my consumption. To that end I have Rose Elliott's Bean Book. Beans, Sauerkraut and protein. However they do not agree with me. 

    So I sprout them first. This changes them from a seed into a plant. It also decreases certain sugars that the seed has available for energy when it germinates which ferment in your gut. However they still don't agree with me.

    So I only make up a batch once a week which lasts two days. The rest of the time I rely on protein and sauerkraut and oats. The oats is in the whole berry, groats. There is a 1200% markup between the groat and the oat. Just for milling it. Nice work if you can get it. I use a Messerschmit grinder as it works well with the boat.

    I attack any salad bowl that comes within range. 

    The oats porridge is not your standard bowl of gruel. It has a large mound of linseed, sunflower and almond meal on top (LSA). You've got to learn to love your liver. (Sandra Cabot's book.)

    I read the ingredients of every food item I buy. Sugar and transfats are put back on the shelves. 

    Curcurmin has a hallowed place in the ship's stores.

    It still does not agree with me. 

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 11:01pm

    #5

    Michael_Rudmin

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 25 2014

    Posts: 877

    Couple additions

    Couple of additional comments:
    1) if you lose significant stomach fat, work your stomach muscles but watch out for hernias.
    2) Don’t lose more than a pound a week. Losing too much too fast can be dangerous. I like to set a weight target each week, and when I hit it, bounce off it slightly.
    3) raw veggies, and especially pumpkin seeds, are really useful to weight loss.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 01, 2016 - 11:08pm

    #6

    Arthur Robey

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 03 2010

    Posts: 1814

    Intelligence gain.

    Naturally as you lose weight your brain to bodyweight ratio will change in your favor. You will become more intelligent.

    Ask any anthropologist. 

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 3:03am

    Reply to #3

    Adam Taggart

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2653

    2+

    You are welcome to your opinion

    Jandeligans –

    You are very welcome to have your own opinion. I'm not looking to change it.

    Just know that for every pro-legume quote you can find, I can match you with those from the anti- side, whether from "alternative" sources like the Paleo enthusiasts, or establishment voices like the FDA.

    From the FDA Poisonous Plant Database:

    TITLE: Significance for humans of biologically active factors in soybeans and other food legumes. 
    FDA #: F19803 
    ABSTRACT: Among the many biologically active factors present in the soybean, only protease inhibitors (PI) have been shown to exert significant adverse effects on animals consuming diets containing soybean protein. Evidence is presented to suggest that (a) PI are only partially responsible for the poor nutritive value of inadequately processed soybeans, (b) low levels of PI are relatively harmless to animals, (c) human trypsin is only weakly inhibited by PI, and (d) the human pancreas is probably insensitive to the hypertrophic effects of PI. Parelleling the wide spread distribution of PI in the plant kingdom are the so called phytohemagglutinins or lectins. Unlike the lectin present in soybeans which appears to have only a marginal effect on the nutritional quality of the protein, the lectin of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is quite toxic. Moreover, the major storage protein of such beans is quite resistant to digestion unless denatured by heat, thus emphasizing the importance of adequate processing of those legumes when used in the human diet. Although goiter inducing compounds are present in most cruciferous plants and cyanide producing substances may be found in cassava and lima beans, traditional methods of preparation and present technology have served to minimize any harmful effects that may accompany the ingestion of these foods by man. Brief mention will also be made of two human diseases, lathyrism and favism, associated with the consumption of Lathynrs sativus and Vicia faba, respectively, their causative agents and mechanism of action. Although there are numerous examples of so called toxic constituents in legumes, they nevertheless have provided a valuable source of protein to man over the centuries. This can be attributed, in part, to the fact that man has learned how to detoxify them by suitable preparative measures. The varied nature of our diet also minimizes the contribution of a toxicant from any one foodstuff. Nevertheless, there is the ever present possibility that the prolonged consumption of a particular legume that may be improperly processed could bring to the surface toxic effects that otherwise would not be apparent. As the shortage of protein becomes more acute, it is not unlikely that much of the population of the world will be faced, in the future, with a more limited selection of protein foods, most of which will be of plant origin and, hence, potential carriers of toxic constituents. The food scientist should at least be cognizant of such a possibility and be prepared to apply his knowledge and skill to meeting this challenge.

    (Source)

    While I recognize that the FDA abstract above does say that we can largely detoxify legumes via "suitable preparative measures", it begs the question: Why bother? If there are other forms of protein readily available to us with higher nutritive value and without the toxicity concerns, what are the big selling points of beans/legumes for a healthy diet?

    But I didn't write this article to convince folks to swear off legumes. In fact, I didn't mention them at all in the original post. If you or anyone else who enjoys eating them want to make them a component of your diet, go for it. As I wrote to Pinecarr "I wouldn't treat beans/legumes as poison".

    Same thing for those who want to pursue a plant-based only diet: go for it. I already mentioned that I agree there are compelling reasons to consider doing so. As I wrote in the original post, I'm not saying the diet outlined above is the only one to pursue to lose weight, or even the best one. I'm simply stating it's one that I know for sure works. And, in my personal assessment, it's well-grounded by scientific evidence (which you can choose to accept or not) as well as healthy living. Of course, you are more than welcome to follow a different path. 

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 3:07am

    Reply to #6

    jtwalsh

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 01 2008

    Posts: 263

    Happy New Year

    Arthur:  Sometimes your posts drive me crazy, then you post something that stretches my brain or something that is just completely witty or brilliant..

    Don't ever stop. 

    Happy New Year!

    JT

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 3:44am

    Reply to #3
    Kim L. Law

    Kim L. Law

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 05 2014

    Posts: 19

    jandeligans wrote:With all

    [quote=jandeligans]

    With all due respect Adam, I applaud your weight loss and attention to nutrition. However, I find the Paleo Diet to be not very scientific. Personally, although it works for weight loss since you are cutting out the refined sugars, I think it is mainly a fad that won't last long.

    [/quote]

    It works but it's not scientific. Hmm, I guess it's between something that is known to work versus the faith of "science"; I think I'll take the former.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 4:14am

    Reply to #6

    Arthur Robey

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 03 2010

    Posts: 1814

    JT

    I was of cause addressing the morality of eating eating Sperm Whales. I knew you would get it.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 5:30am

    #7
    msnyc

    msnyc

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 02 2016

    Posts: 3

    How to REALLY lose weight.

    If you care about pollution and how your diet effects the planet you should try a plant-based vegan lifestyle, not eat MORE meat.

    Animal production is destroying the planet. Rainforests are being bulldozed to create grazing land. Methane from factory farms releases far more C02 into the environment than cars and wastes thousands of gallons of water per pound of finished meat.

    And thanks to the Trans-Pacific-Partnership we now will be exporting meat created with our scarce natural resources overseas to enrich agriculture conglomerates while polluting our environment. 

    If you eat meat because you believe you need protein to be fit, check out the 'World fittest man" Rich Roll, ultra-marathon-runner Scott Jerek or most other vegans who are slimmer and healthier than most meat eaters. 

    Why support an industry that deceives consumers, pollutes the environment, exploits workers and is horribly cruel to animals?

    Here is a documentary on YouTube that will explain the environmental consequences of eating meat for FREE. And some other links of interest if you're interested.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngV-8COyvZw

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpPRi7st8pY

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 6:56am

    Reply to #6
    Yoxa

    Yoxa

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 20 2011

    Posts: 286

    Quote: Naturally as you lose

    [quote] Naturally as you lose weight your brain to bodyweight ratio will change in your favor. You will become more intelligent. [/quote]

    That's a cheery thought, but it assumes that your brain manages not to lose anything. 😉

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 8:27am

    Reply to #7
    Kim L. Law

    Kim L. Law

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 05 2014

    Posts: 19

    The elephant in the room...

    The elephant in the room is overpopulation. Blaming meat consumption for environmental problems just don't make sense. Carnivores have been living on earth far before humans did and no environmental damage happened. The problem is the unnatural production of meat (thanks to oil) needed to feed these many people.

    Assuming that you were somehow successful with your go vegan campaign and half the non-vegans switch to vegan diets but you continue to allow human population to grow. When population doubles in about 50 years. then what? You are back to square one.

    ———————

    [quote=msnyc]

    If you eat meat because you believe you need protein to be fit, check out the 'World fittest man" Rich Roll, ultra-marathon-runner Scott Jerek or most other vegans who are slimmer and healthier than most meat eaters.

    [/quote]

    I'm most certain that I need protein to be fit. I am extremely skeptical that Scott Jerek did it without any protein consumption.

    Jokes aside, I want to discuss the health benefits of vegan vs. non-vegan diets. Considering the fact that humans cannot derive all our nutritional needs from plants like herbivores can. I am seriously doubtful that vegan diets are the OPTIMAL diet for humans.

    Vitamin B12 is only produced by microbes. As such all vegans have to obtain this nutrient from non-vegan sources. Plants also often do not have essential amino acids that are in proportion to what humans need, and vegans have to carefully stagger vegetables to avoid nutritional deficiency.

    These facts alone should be enough to suggest that vegan diets are not the best diet for humans. However we are only considering the nutritional sciences that we know about now. There may be vitamins and nutrients that we have yet to discover. Omnivorous diet may confer additional health benefits that we do not know about. I can assure you that a vegan diet will not be superior to omnivorous diet simply because humans are not herbivores and cannot derive all nutritional need from plants.

    I have not heard of any disease or nutritional problems caused by moderate meat consumption, like B12 deficiency, essential amino acid deficiencies, gluten intolerance or leaky gut for that matter. It will take more than a few scare videos about environmental impact of meat consumption and success stories on vegan diets to prove to me that vegan diet is superior to an omnivorous diet that match human physiology.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 2:42pm

    #8

    Quercus bicolor

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 230

    Too much dairy

    Hmmm.  Maybe I'm eating too much dairy?

    Here is what I eat on average each day:

    • 12 oz: whole milk yogurt (I make it myself with [unfortunately] pasteurized milk from a small local dairy that sells the yellowest butter I've ever seen.  I generally make it without repasteurizing within 48 hours of that batch's first appearance in my food coop's fridge.
    • 2 oz creme fraiche (again made myself, but the source isn't quite a pure as the yogurt – probably significant grain feeding).
    • 2 oz cheese – mostly raw made with milk from good sources.
    • 1/2 oz butter – that good yellow butter mentioned above.

    That adds up to:

    • 57g milk fat (500 calories, 25% of my daily calories – wow!).
    • 32g protein – a significant portion of my daily protein.
    • hard to tell about carbs, lactose – probably not much lactose (it's all either fermented or it's butter/cream), but somewhat more carbs.

    I read the article Adam linked to.  It mentioned acne as a potential sign of dairy issues.  I do seem to have a mild case of persistent acne on my butt.  It could be from too much sitting at my desk job, but it could also be a symptom of too much dairy consumption.  Hmmm.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 3:01pm

    Reply to #7
    msnyc

    msnyc

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 02 2016

    Posts: 3

    Just sharing what worked for me and what I learned.

    "The elephant in the room is overpopulation. Blaming meat consumption for environmental problems just don't make sense. Carnivores have been living on earth far before humans did and no environmental damage happened."

    Of course, animal farming caused less pollution when people raised and killed their own animals but It's a proven fact, and there is no doubt, that animal consumption and specifically factory farming causes serious environmental damage. Have you ever drove past a cow or pig farm?

    I forget the exact stat in the Cowspracy clip I posted that I'm sure you didn't watch but most of the farm land in this country is used to grow feed for livestock, not people. 

    And of course vegans eat protein! Its a popular misconception that vegans don't get enough B12 or protein. I I've never heard of a vegan with a protein deficiency but I do know meat eaters that have high cholesterol, are overweight or have diabetes. These aren't problems faced by vegans. I do add nutritional yeast to savory dishes and according to my latest blood work with an integrative medicine doctor my blood work was excellent.

    If you look around the world you can clearly see that countries that eat the least animal products weight less and live longer. Google the China Study.

    If you look at animals that do eat meat, they have sharp teeth to kill and tear animals apart. They eat the guts, lick up the warm blood and can digest raw meat, eating all parts of the animal. Most humans would be repulsed seeing this, not salivating. Humans need to properly cook animals to avoid getting sick. Put a starving child in a crib with an apple and a bunny and I bet it will play with the bunny and eat the apple.

    Here's some more links, not to scare you but just to share. As a runner, I went vegan to improve my athletic performance and honestly I have never had more energy, been fitter and felt more alert and alive than I feel now. Believe me, I loved steak and burgers but these books convinced me to at least try a plant-based diet and decide for myself. I'm not saying it was easy but it totally transformed my life!

    http://www.amazon.com/Thrive-Nutrition-Optimal-Performance-Sports-ebook/dp/B004GB1FTY/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1451744651&sr=1-1&keywords=vegan+performance

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/35038053/arnold-schwarzenegger-stop-eating-meat-and-save-the-planet

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 3:40pm

    Reply to #8
    msnyc

    msnyc

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 02 2016

    Posts: 3

    Dairy: 6 Reasons You Should Avoid It at all Costs

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 3:46pm

    Reply to #4

    KugsCheese

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 01 2010

    Posts: 845

    Arthur Robey wrote:It still

    [quote=Arthur Robey]

    It still does not agree with me. 

    [/quote]

    Try digestive enzyme.   Regarding inflammation and beans: my Dad and my friend both stopped eating legumes/beans/peanuts then inflammatory hand aches went away.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 3:52pm

    #9

    KugsCheese

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 01 2010

    Posts: 845

    Fat Calories Ratio?

    Adam, what is your diet's total calories per day and what ratio of those calories come from fat?  Thanks!

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 5:22pm

    Reply to #9

    Adam Taggart

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2653

    Depends on the day

    Kugs –

    Total calories depends on the day, but usually ranges between 2,000-3,000 calories. I eat on the high end if it's been a strength training (i.e. heavy lifting) day.

    Total % from fat varies, too, but I'd say it ranges between 40-55%

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 10:28pm

    #10

    mememonkey

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Nov 01 2009

    Posts: 108

    1+

    Fat Loss narratives, science and experience

    Thought I'd wade into the fray on the subject of diet and weight loss.   I think I should be able piss off just about everybody!  

    A bit of background to start with.  I am a vegetarian and have been for 45 years,  I spent several years as a vegan about the time I was initially exposed to the China study proponents, forks over knives documentary  etc.   I had however become fat and unhealthy by eating too much sugar and grains and the processed food typical in the SAD or standard American Diet.     This last year I finally got serious about my health, and modified my diet and exercise.

       I successfully lost 50 lbs of Fat and gained 6 pounds of lean body mass.  In a relatively short time frame ( 5 mos)   In doing this I spent an inordinate amount of time researching diets, human metabolism, exercise etc.From low carb, to low fat, to Paleo, to ketogenic, cyclical ketogenic, to vegan, vegetarian, etc.   

    Here are my takeaways,  Bear in mind.  As Adam pointed out,  I am not trying to change anyones belief system  you are welcome to disagree with me.

    First,  multiple disparate approaches will work even if not necessarily working for the assumed underlying cause.   This is why both heavy meat (paleo) and whole food (vegan) diets can have fat loss/ health benefits.

    The standard trope its Calories in vs Calories out.  or a "calorie is a calorie" is a false premise.  While the overarching balance of calories ingested vs. burned  needs to be in some deficit for weight loss. the type and quality of calories will have a significant effect on hormonal process involved in fat mobilization, efficiency of  fat burning, and probably most significantly satiety and control of hunger.  This is why it is easier to lose and maintain weight on  low carb high fat diet than a low fat high carb diet. even though it is possible to lose fat on both given a caloric deficit.

    The body of existing nutritional science is not currently very well developed.  Most, (not all) studies that exist and are quoted endlessly to support opposing viewpoints are flawed, not well controlled, small samples etc. 

    This unfortunate circumstance coupled with the incredible complexity of humans including variables between, genetics, epigenetics, individual variations and adaptations hereditary influences etc etc.  make it extremely difficult to offer singular prescriptive advise.   Case in point what works for a moderately overweight individual will be different than the dynamics for a metabolically deranged severely obese individual or why people of Japanese ancestry process, white rice differently than Europeans

    This is why it is important to treat your own fat loss regime as a controlled experiment and track, monitor and adjust as you proceed.   It is extremely useful to start with an accurate body composition analysis.  the gold standard  is  a Dexa scan but a  water tank or less intrusively an "Inbody" bio impedance scale available at some health clubs and Dr's offices can give you similarly accurate level information.

    Diets as Narratives. 

    Humans tend to process and transmit information as narratives.   Narratives tend to take on religious dimensions and become infused with faith and even morality  Veganisim and Paleo being prime examples.   In my opinion they both contain elements of truth, but neither are  complete or definitive.

    I am a vegetarian, and believe in many of the associated moral principles as well as the practical environmental ones but despite that I have come to believe that animal protein is a superior form of protein.  I agree that the primary issue we face as a species is population overshoot as a function of excessive (oil ) energy supply.  I believe humans are naturally omnivorous. Yet I'm still a vegetarian.

    That said,  there are some universal principles that fall under the heading of common sense and are effective regardless of the 'Narrative' of diet you select. 

    Eat at a calorie deficit.   Tracking caloric and macro nutrients using tool like my fitness pal which Adam mentioned is very useful.  You don't need to do this for ever, a couple weeks to a month will calibrate your sense of proportion and knowledge of caloric content and density of foods you eat and allow you to do transition to a natural intuitive control.

    As everybody notes.  Eat whole foods,  the further away from processing the better.

    Eat a significantly lower ratio of carbs, to fat

    Don't eat processed vegetable oils corn safflower soybean etc.  Instead,  Coconut oil, olive oil, avacado

    Trans Fats are very bad

    Saturated fat is not unhealthy despite that being an article of faith in our culture. The science behind that was wrong.   Vegans pointing out that meat eaters have clogged arteries and vegans don't, confuses causality. 

    The primary issue behind heart disease, strokes and a host of other diseases such as Alzheimers, is inflammation, due to the repeated roller coaster of hormonal insult due to consumption of sugar and sugar like ( processed grain) foods.

    Some thoughts on exercise for weight loss and health.

    While cardio vascular or aerobic fitness is an important component of health.  As it is practiced for weight loss it is often counter productive.

    Intense cardio  increases appetite and makes dietary control difficult.

    Running. especially long distance running is counterintuitively  unhealthy if you factor the aggregate effects of inflammation and joint damage over time. ( Btw I know this will piss off runners but look at the body composition of heavy duty long distance  runners, like Rich Roll they are skinny but not in a good way.) If you have to run consider short burst high intensity  interval hill sprints. 

    For fat loss,  brisk walking or hiking up hill is much more conducive.  Try to hit 45 minutes per session and 3- 4 days per week alternating with resistance training.

    Resistance training is truly the fountain of youth.  But here also moderation is the key.  3 days per week,  30 to 40 minutes is  enough to preserve lean body mass while losing fat.  Concentrate on proper form and slow movement.  Both your muscles and your central nervous system needs adequate recovery between sessions

    When you've hit your body fat goals, you can increase the volume of resistance training but maintain the adequate amount of rest. Go for continutiy and balance over the long term.

    Intense often competitive regimes like crossfit can be counterproductive in the long run with potential for injury and over training. This is less obvious to younger people whose capacity for recovery from abuse is much higher. 

    That said the benefit of sustained resistance training as a component of lifestyle  can not be overstated.  to the extent that you find a social support network(like crossfit does  that supports that objective it can be a net positive. 

    Finally,  not mentioned here so far in the fat loss game is the concept of intermittent fasting which has a variety of modalities,  but at it's simplest is the concept of not eating breakfast and extending the natural nighttime fast until sometime in the early afternoon or even evening.  This has the effect of increasing the effective presence of human growth hormone for longer periods which is conducive to fat mobilization.  It also helps with issue of satiety and psychological fulfillment by allowing one to consume the same amount of calories but in larger portions by concentrating them into fewer meals.  Humans surprising adapt well, to this regime and people will often not experience hunger until the delayed meal time arrives.  Note that woman do not adapt as well to this type of eating, although many are able to at least move breakfast until lunch time.

     

    mememonkey

     

     

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 02, 2016 - 11:49pm

    #11

    Arthur Robey

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 03 2010

    Posts: 1814

    1+

    Sucking the marrow from the bone.

    When you get to my age, you look around you for examples of people who are immortal so that you can follow their example. They are in thin supply. 

    The question then becomes,  OK, I've made it this far,  now what? If I am to be denied quantity then I must concentrate on quality. Work really lowers the quality of life. Therefore I eat cheap most of the time. But when I eat out I suck the marrow the bone.

    The reason why diet wars rage, my profound ignorance informs me, is that assumptions are leapt to.

    You are not what you think you are. That is your ego leading you astray.  You are an ever changing walking swamp.  Change your gut biome and voila, you are a completely different walking swamp. 

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 12:19am

    Reply to #10
    Yoxa

    Yoxa

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 20 2011

    Posts: 286

    1+

    Quote: the type and quality

    [quote] the type and quality of calories will have a significant effect on hormonal process involved in fat mobilization, efficiency of  fat burning, and probably most significantly satiety and control of hunger.[/quote]

    This matches my experience. I finally started losing excess weight when I stopped trying to eat low-fat. Influenced by the Wheat Belly diet, I focused instead on eliminating wheat from my diet, and that  was the first approach that ever worked for me.

    I'm down over eighty pounds from what I weighed three years ago.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 12:33am

    #12

    Arthur Robey

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 03 2010

    Posts: 1814

    1+

    80 lbs!

    Strewth! 80 lbs! Congratulations Yoxa.
    You are half the man you used to be.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 1:06am

    #13
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 893

    Eat what your ancesters ate...the

    "blues zones" ave been eating and living the same for centuries…Ain't changing  mares diet. She's from Suffolk England.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 2:15am

    #14

    charleshughsmith

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 15 2010

    Posts: 699

    Out on a limb here...

    Setting aside the many elements of diet and the lively debates (important) for a moment, I just want to point out that I recently posted photos of my relatively trim 62-year old frame because Adam posted his (much younger) fit frame, and now he's posted new photos, so now I need an excuse to post more of mine… (all in fun, forgive the light tone…)

    On a serious note, it seems the "blue zone" active-elderly tend home gardens, so they're eating a lot of fresh vegetables and those veggies probably have a lot of micro-nutrients.

    Another point: the protein content of many veggies is often overlooked.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 3:27am

    Reply to #14

    mememonkey

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Nov 01 2009

    Posts: 108

    Cage match!

    [quote=charleshughsmith]

    Setting aside the many elements of diet and the lively debates (important) for a moment, I just want to point out that I recently posted photos of my relatively trim 62-year old frame because Adam posted his (much younger) fit frame, and now he's posted new photos, so now I need an excuse to post more of mine… (all in fun, forgive the light tone…)

    [/quote]

    forget the pics  l want to see a cage match between you and Adam,  For what it's worth I've got my money on you Charles due to the cunning that comes with age!

     

    mememonkey

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 3:36am

    Reply to #14

    Adam Taggart

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2653

    I Agree

    [quote=mememonkey]

    For what it's worth I've got my money on you Charles due to the cunning that comes with age!

    [/quote]

    I agree! Can I bet against myself??

    Adam

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 3:06pm

    #15

    sand_puppy

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 1978

    Thanks, Adam

    And the rest of you working with this topic. Really good and timely reminders.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 5:09pm

    Reply to #3
    cowtown2011

    cowtown2011

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 12 2011

    Posts: 34

    I was on a Paleo diet for a

    I was on a Paleo diet for a while and have since switched based on further research into the subject and other insights as you’ve noted above. It would be great if Peak Prosperity would interview “experts” on other diets or approaches. Losing weight is one thing but being healthy is another.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 5:49pm

    Reply to #14

    charleshughsmith

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 15 2010

    Posts: 699

    if cunning means knowing one's limits...

    I'm afraid my cunning boils down to knowing one's limits…

    I would gladly engage in a "how fast can you eat an organic lamb burger topped with local cheese" contest with Adam… everyone wins!

    Actually i did ask Adam to be my sparring partner for some slow-mo martial arts moves I've been working on. His fencing experience turned out to be more useful than I'd anticipated. This reinforced the core truth of martial arts and indeed life itself: There are no perfect attacks or defenses, everything has a trade-off, a risk and an opening for an opponent–just like any investment, career move, etc. Flexibility, adaptability and fast learning are what counts in the real-life cage match–us against the world.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 7:36pm

    #16

    Jim H

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 08 2009

    Posts: 1798

    Elimination of Wheat

    Thank you for the discussion of diet, exercise, and health.  I will reiterate here that, based on my own research and personal experience, the single most powerful change that most folks can make in their diet is the total elimination of wheat.  Simply stated, in many of us wheat can set off a cascade of effects, starting in the gut, that can lead to many of the afflictions talked about herein of an inflammatory or inflammatory/autoimmune nature.  The best route, as advocated by the author of the book,  "WheatBelly", cardiologist William Davis, is to eliminate wheat and reduce all grains as much as possible.

    For me, all joint problems (most significant knee related) have receded after three years gluten free.  Not a twinge.

    While some people can reach excellent health while moderating wheat intake, I could not.  This is because, for many of us, wheat is also addictive in nature (I am not kidding);

     

    what reversal of facial inflammation looks like





    Leave a Comment

    Screen Shot 2016-01-03 at 10.17.20 AM

    Michelle shared her photos of her 7-month Wheat Belly journey reflecting the loss of 52 pounds and oodles of inflammation.

    I just want to say how thankful I am for Wheat Belly!

    “I’ve struggled with my weight all my life. In June, I decided to give Wheat Belly a try, and I’ve never looked back. The first couple of weeks were hard, but now I find it so easy. The amazing thing to me is that my sweet cravings are gone.

    “I’ve lost 52 pounds so far and plan to keep going. Thanks so much!

    Look at the change in Michelle’s face: thinner, yes, but look around the eyes and the size of the eyes themselves—less edema, larger eyes. These are the signature facial changes we see in people following the Wheat Belly lifestyle who reject the inflammation and water retention of wheat and grains.

    This, of course, happens as a body-wide process. Besides the wonderful facial changes, Michelle has also likely experienced relief from edema in the ankles and calves, reversal of joint inflammation, reversal of brain inflammation (that leads over time to dementia), and reversal of gastrointestinal inflammation/irritation. And she’s no longer a victim of the cravings for sweets that we call a “wheat tooth” because it is caused by exposure to the opiates that develop with partial digestion of the gliadin protein of wheat and related (“prolamin”) proteins of other grains, now banished from her diet.

    Many physicians advise high-dose Crestor, a statin drug, for inflammation’s contribution to cardiovascular risk, or non=steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for joint inflammation, or any number of other drugs, many quite toxic, all to “treat” the consequences of eating wheat and grains, the most inflammatory components of the modern diet. But YOU have the real solution to body inflammation right in your own hands.

    I thought that I lacked willpower before going gluten free, but I was in fact subject to a craving set off in the opiate receptors of my brain.  This is not true for everyone, but it sure was for me.  The fact is, most doctors still believe that the only folks who need to avoid wheat are those who test positive for celiac.  This is simply untrue and a great disservice to many.  

    Read through the personal experiences of people who have gone gluten and grain free here;

    http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/blog/

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2016 - 10:30pm

    #17
    pgp

    pgp

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 01 2014

    Posts: 165

    Corporate sponsored Food religion kills humanity

    Well done Adam. 

    Clearly food like every other religion is another fomenter of societal killers. 

    From my own personal experience (very much like Adams) I managed to add muscle while reducing fat percentage significantly just by eating the right foods and NEVER feeling hungry.  When you experience such profound changes and results, you absolutely know you've found the right diet, at which point you can't help but be angry at the BS the world has been selling you while encouraging you to poison yourself for most of your life.

    Sadly the "RIGHT diet" is going to piss off the vegans. sugar junkies and most of the commercial food industry.  Worse the "RIGHT diet"  probably isn't sustainable in a world of 9 billion people or even a third of that number.

    For those that have first hand experience the simple facts become obvious: The human metabolism is ONLY designed to process fat and protein. The body simply does NOT regulate carbohydrates very well.  That's because the humans we evolved from didn't need to; fruit and carbohydrates were seasonal and sporadic,  It was the fish, meat and animal fats from hunting that kept our ancestors alive – insects as well in a pinch.  When you understand biology and eat right the truth becomes blindingly obvious.  Fruit trees evolved NOT to make us healthy but to make us HUNGRY.  So we would eat more of their offerings and serendipitously spread their seeds in our feces far and wide – look it up that's how fruit trees work symbiotically with a lot of animal life.

    So the revelation is:  grains, potatoes fruit sugars, confuse the bodies ability to balance calories.  In addition a lot of grains (and some vegetables) contain glutens, phytic acids and lectins that harm the gut, affect absorption or lead to auto-immune disease because of their inflammatory effects on the body's connective and other tissue.  I know this to be true "hands on" so this is NOT another example of an applied belief system or conviction by denial.

    It is only tradition or religion that tells us to eat grains like horses.  Grains/agriculture made the first farmers rich and allowed large cities to survive (until the water ran out).  But the end result of agriculture is subjugation, wealth disparity and mediocre health.  All the things the human race has come to know and love today more than ever.

    The irony is that as humans discover how to eat properly they will quickly find there isn't actually enough food for everyone.  Fresh water is on the decline, pastures are polluted, food practices (like feeder lots) make food toxic, oceans are ruined, the fish are contaminated so our essential source of omega 3 (which has *profoundly* beneficial effects in a high fat/protein, zero carb diet) is becoming unsustainable.  That latter fact alone spells doom for humanity.

    Its all just more evidence demonstrating that the human species has lost its way, has been lost for a while…. There is no hope except maybe for a few pockets of lucky communities.  The cruel truth is that we can't all be lucky someone has to suffer – that means billions and its disgusting but then humans put themselves in this position because of under utilization of higher brain function. 

    Humans are just gorillas in the mist, animals first, sentients second.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Tue, Jan 05, 2016 - 2:41am

    #18

    westcoastjan

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 04 2012

    Posts: 186

    something lighthearted before we all bear down...

    http://globalnews.ca/video/2424692/1-year-old-has-priceless-reaction-to-his-first-taste-of-bacon/?utm_source=Other&utm_medium=MostPopularVideo&utm_campaign=2016

    cheeky Jan

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Tue, Jan 05, 2016 - 7:49am

    Reply to #18

    thatchmo

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 13 2008

    Posts: 330

    uummmm, bacon

    I'll stop sharing this someday…..Aloha, Steve.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Tue, Jan 05, 2016 - 6:45pm

    Reply to #3
    DaveyJones

    DaveyJones

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 05 2016

    Posts: 1

    Could not agree moreIf you

    Could not agree more

    If you think about it, humans have been on this planet for some time. Their diet has changed dramatically especially in the last fifty years. Their ancestors are an interesting (and relevant) thing to look at. Many of them can recognize and eat HUNDREDS of edible plants. Above everything else, DIVERSITY, is the key to nutrition, health and survival. It not only makes common sense but is part of most natural structures…including economic ones. Notice that permaculture may be our only way out of this and that is simply mimicking the diversity and resilience of the natural systems.

    There are plenty of studies out there that follow folks with above average longevity and low meat, diverse plant diets are indeed the overwhelming, recurring factor. I recommend an older documentary called "Food Matters" for starters. I think there is a BBC documentary out there called How to Live to 101

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 07, 2016 - 7:15pm

    Reply to #7
    Athens Sam

    Athens Sam

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 26 2013

    Posts: 4

    Cows Save the Planet

    To the "meat murders the planet" meme, let me add:

    "Annuals murder the planet, perennials and grazing  animals save the planet".  Vegans and other annualholics should consider themselves unindicted co-conspirators.   OK, just kidding..

    Mark Shepard promotes a model of permaculture that could replace current agrobiz , while rebuilding soil, sequestering carbon, managing water, and improving human health.  Here he makes his pitch:

    Why should Vegans should care about annuals vs perennials?

    Shepard bangs on about the evils of annual plant agriculture.  Briefly, annuals role in nature is rapid colonization of disturbed soil, so they grow fast and produce a lot of seed. Unlike perennials they ultimately damage the soil.  An annual based culture eventually (he argues) destroys the soil.  In our partnership with annuals, we've come to regard routinely damaging the soil (plowing) as normal and necessary.

    Once our soil is gone,  we have to move on, maybe invade Australia and drive Arthur off his land :).  Or substitute expensive, petroleum based inputs to our own damaged soil. 

    The alternative is a mostly perennial based system, integrating insights of Yeoman for water, J.Russel Smith for tree crops,  Savory for grazing, and Morrison for Permaculture integration.  He argues this can outproduce the current system, acre for acre, input for input and is more resilient in every way as it just mimicks nature.  Annuals are grown as the soil tolerates.  Soil gets better and better, not worse and worse.

    Of course, the worst is probably oil-based annual production shipped cross-country to feed-lots, to produce meat shipped back cross country to land, attractively shrink-wrapped in my grocery cart.  Vegans and others are absolutely correct how awful this system is, but the same system to produce tofu is pretty bad too. 

    I'm basically a suburban professional who loves his shrink-wrapped meat, so……  

    You PP farmers out there, do these ideas pass the smell test?  Inquiring minds want to know. 

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Jan 07, 2016 - 7:18pm

    #19
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 25 2009

    Posts: 893

    too busy to type

    but, in a short answer, yes, it passes the smell test. there is alot of research that red meat has bad rap secondary to the CAFO model. The american bison did much to sequester th carbon being burnt by annual grains farmers to put weight on the CAFO product.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 09, 2016 - 5:36pm

    #20
    Brainless

    Brainless

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 09 2008

    Posts: 76

    1+

    I am on a LCHF diet...

    and it works for me.

    It is a bit different as the Paleo but the main features are still to eat less carbohydrates. I live in Thailand and rice is a staple food. I slowly gained weight over the years. Getting rid of that weight was as good as impossible on other kinds of diets, mostly low fat, low sugar. But carbohydrates especially the ones found in refined food like white rice, bread, pasta convert to sugars right away, preventing me from loosing weight. Those carbohydrates came mainly from fruit! My glucose levels where a bit high, not pre diabetic but also not far away from it. LCHF allows very little fruit but lots of vegetables, especially the leafy (dark)green ones.

    After reading a lot and finally having a friend writing me about his success of loosing weight i got on the LCHF diet. The trick in that diet is to get into 'ketosis', which means your body is starting to use ketones as an energy source instead of glucose. Basically you stop eating carbs and sugars and replace that with fat. Vegetables are added for their nutrients and vitamins. Some potassium deficiency can occur, so having some potassium supplements might be needed. Also little extra salt is needed.

    Your body will switch to the other (ketones) energy source and by lower your calorie intake the fat cells are being processed into ketones to fulfill your energy needs and are burned for energy. Glucose in your blood stops that process so as long as you have too much glucose in your blood insulin is produced to save you from glucose poisoning. The way it does that is converting the glucose into fat and store it. It is basic body chemistry and know for many decades. 🙂

    Keep the sugar/carbs out of your food and it will not end up in your blood. No insulin is needed to regulate your glucose levels and the path for converting fat into ketones is free. I am not very active and i still loose weight. Add some exercise and the weight will fly off.

    Eating more fat, moderate protein and very little carbs will also prevent you from feeling hungry. There is no sugar addiction anymore so there is no craving for it.

    One thing that is uncomfortable is the period that your body adjust to using ketones instead of glucose. It is called the 'keto flu' and the symptoms are just like having a flu. It happens somewhere between 1-3 weeks after you start the diet depending on how many sugars and carbs are in your food. It takes about a week to adjust. Knowing this beforehand helps to not quit. Once this 'flu' is over you will feel much more energetic and focused as before.

    Googling LCHF will give many results.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Tue, Jan 12, 2016 - 1:08am

    #21
    Jeffleonard90@gmail.com

    [email protected]

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 17 2012

    Posts: 41

    Great job!

    Adam thank you for putting this out there, inspiring!  Here is a interesting talk about grazing animals.  If managed correctly they are good for the planet and the grasslands.  Seems to me, even if the carbon aspect is overstated, managed grazing is a very sustainable way to produce food.  Tilling and plowing is very destructive for the soil and the microorganisms that live there.  

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Tue, Jan 12, 2016 - 3:10am

    #22
    foodaddicts

    foodaddicts

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 12 2016

    Posts: 1

    Thanks so much, Adam, and I'm

    Thanks so much, Adam, and I'm so happy for your success! 

    I used to spend an obscene amount of time researching diets, food plans, weight loss tricks, workout routines etc in order to keep my weight under control, but nothing worked. I had the knowledge but couldn't put it into action for the life of me. I eventually reached 240lbs and was miserable. 

    I then found a free, 12-step program for food addiction (www.foodaddicts.org) and my life completely changed. The structure, discipline and support the program gave me was exactly what I needed–not to mention a relationship with a power greater than myself since I could NOT stop eating on my own. I've maintained a healthy 125lbs for over 7 years and my obsession with food, my weight and my body have all disappeared. I am so grateful!!

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 15, 2016 - 1:55am

    #23
    greendoc

    greendoc

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 23 2008

    Posts: 112

    1+

    N = 1

    I applaud Adam for his commitment to health and wonderful success. As a naturopathic doctor, I think he accidentally left these words off his comment " I'm simply stating it's one that I know for sure works."  And those would be: FOR ME.  

    What Adam so well outlined here is called in medical research a case report of a single individual. (or n =1.) 

    Anyone can cherry pick the research and find studies that support their theory of what is a superior diet (I am not saying that Adam is doing that here). Research on nutrition is notoriously difficult to do well, and mostly looks at the short term results of weeks to months, not what happens 10 years down the road. And even in those studies that show a statistical benefit of a particular diet, there are always people in the treatment group who did not benefit (or even got worse).

    There is no doubt a diet that eschews grains, beans, dairy is helping many people regain their health and lose weight (or gain if that is needed). However, it can also be a disaster for some people who are APOE4, or have a genotype that makes it harder for them to metabolize fat, or just too sedentary and eat too many fat calories.

    I cringe when I see this topic come up because it always seems to devolve into a shouting match (at respectful levels) between the Paleo and Whole foods Plant based Diet folk.

    The truth is both camps share a lot in common: eating lots of nutrient dense food in form of roots, tubers and green leafy veggies, nuts and seeds. They also face challenges eating outside of the home in restaurants. But I do not think there is one diet that rules all. Weston Price DDS found isolated communities eating ancestral diets all over the world: from Swiss eating cold weather grains like oats /barley and dairy to tropical islanders eating fish and lots of starches and coconut. And all had good health (and more importantly to him…excellent teeth!)

    As a clinician recommending diets to patients, I run out of time explaining the nuances of all the possible ways to feed oneself in a healthy manner. I often give them homework, to read this article I stumbled on a while back that I think does a good job explaining my position. http://www.precisionnutrition.com/best-diet. I have no affiliation with that website nor do I recommend their services…it just happens to be a thoughtful piece.

    In many ways Michael Pollan said it best “Eat real food, not too much, mostly plants.” The problem is to find a sustainable diet (for the person, their budget and the planet) that is enjoyable and actionable….meaning folks can learn how to prepare/purchase those foods without too much trouble and stick with it. And be flexible as time passes and their needs change. How a 30 year old male who crossfits and a frail 75 year old woman will look very, very different.

    I was fortunate to study with the great Tori Hudson, ND who always said “Your life is an experiment, and you live in your laboratory”. So if you are feeling confused about what to eat, try experimenting and do your on case study of 1. Buy a glucometer, keep a diet diary, make a commitment to eat more vegetables. Start with baby steps. Or go big and make a radical departure on a new journey of nourishing yourself like Adam. If at first you don't succeed, try , try again. Ultimately you (and your lab values and waistline) are the best judge of what diet is right for you.

    Respectfully, 

    Claire

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Jan 15, 2016 - 11:00pm

    #24

    pinecarr

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2008

    Posts: 1091

    Wonderful post, Clare

    I love the quote you shared from Tori Hudson, ND:

    Your life is an experiment, and you live in your laboratory

    -Great concept!

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Jan 16, 2016 - 1:06pm

    #25
    VeganDB12

    VeganDB12

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 18 2008

    Posts: 114

    Every step makes sense to me

    Adam-a belated response. Excellent and digestible!laugh

    Diet is so personal. You were kind to give a hat tip to the veggie crowd. Just FYI I fit Claire's profile of the person for whom paleo would be a disaster-this I know following extensive testing, and personal experience. The funny thing is I went veggie 2 decades before I knew any of that. Intuition? don't know.

    Refined carbs seem to be a universal problem. I like to remind people that sugar water is used as a reinforcer in rat studies to get them to do anything. It hits the reward centers of the brain like any other addictive substance. A vegan who eats chips and candy all day without adequate b12, fiber, omega 3 fatty acids etc…is in big big trouble and at risk for all kinds of metabolic and cardiac issues. 

    Your guidelines make perfect sense. I find tracking food intake and weighing myself daily makes a huge difference re; weight gain. That and eating beans every day (sorry to my near and dear but it is true) mostly lentils.

    Many thanks.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Mon, Jan 01, 2018 - 11:59am

    #26

    Adam Taggart

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2653

    1+

    Taken Even Further

    For those who haven’t read this update, these photos show the progress possible when following the advice in the original post above with extreme discipline:

    For the record, I’m not at this same low % fat right now. This was for a competition — a level that’s hard to maintain. (That, plus I decided to enjoy a few meals over the holiday season)

    But I have been able to maintain the weight reached for the “after” photo in the original post above. The nutrition program detailed above combined with a fitness/sleep/stress management regime is *definitely* sustainable as an enjoyable lifestyle.

    Happy New Year 2018!

    Adam

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Jan 07, 2018 - 8:06pm

    Reply to #3
    cowan368

    cowan368

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 07 2018

    Posts: 1

    legumes

    Legumes: Legumes (also known as pulses) include beans (black, kidney, pinto, soybeans and derivative products such as tofu, etc.), lentils, peas, alfalfa, and peanuts and peanut butter. While legumes are seen as less offensive than grains, because they have a higher nutritional value and lower levels of anti-nutrients, paleo deems legumes unnecessary to consume. Legumes are simply not something humans have evolved to eat. Not only should legumes be soaked, sprouted, denatured, and cooked before their nutrients can be fully utilized, but in many cases they are also non-digestible and even toxic if not extensively pre-treated. In fact, one of the most deadly poisons known to man is ricin, a highly toxic poison extracted from the seeds of the castor bean plant. Ricin has been used in military attacks for decades. While cooking does neutralize the toxic effects of a lectin known as PHA (phytohemagglutinin), it does not completely eliminate it. Hence, especially in sensitive people, legume consumption can promote leaky gut syndrome.

    Legumes are generally not the great source of protein they are sometimes reputed to be, but, like grains, are an abundant source of cheap carbohydrates that easily convert to glucose. Ironically, one of the main features of legumes touted by some dietitians is that they contain lots of fiber and may assist in bowel health. However, the fiber in beans and most other legumes is not only unnecessary, but can also possibly be counterproductive. As has been the case throughout evolution, optimal fiber intake can occur simply by consuming abundant vegetables. A diet heavy in grains and legumes can easily deliver excess fiber and lead to constipation, inhibited nutrient absorption, and other digestive problems. The fact that legumes commonly cause flatulence (due to the fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates in the intestinal tract) offers a practical indication that they cause digestive distress when ingested.

     

    A sampling of legumes; less offensive than grains, but still not a necessary component of a healthy diet

    Saponins: Legumes also contain anti-nutrients called saponins, so named because they foam up like soap when shaken in water. Saponins also provide a chemical defense for plants against microbes and fungi. The detergent-like chemical structure of saponins enable them to easily bind on one end with water molecules and to cholesterol and fat molecules on the other end. Their unique amphiphilic (water soluble paired with water insoluble) structure is what enables saponins to easily create pores on the surface of cells they interact with. Saponins permeate not only gut cell membranes, but also membranes of all other cells. For example, when saponins enter the bloodstream via a leaky gut, they can compromise the ability of red blood cells to process oxygen in a process called hemolysis.

    Cooking does not destroy saponins, so beans and legumes will provide you with a full dose, even when cooked. However, fermenting does destroy saponins, making fermented products such as tempeh more attractive to eat. Athletes should take note that soy protein isolate, commonly used in inexpensive protein supplement powders, is extremely high in saponins. Robb Wolf, author of The Paleo Solution, notes that, “saponins are so irritating to the immune system that they are used in vaccine research to help the body mount a powerful immune response. Those suffering acutely from the effects of leaky gut and requiring a strict exclusionary diet often eliminate saponin-containing foods such as all legumes (alfalfa, beans, peas, lentils, soy products), amaranth, buckwheat, and quinoa, chia and flax seeds, and even root beer.

    Saponins have also been found to have some anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial properties, but in general can be problematic, especially in sensitive people, due to their ability to permeate cellular linings and mucous linings in the body. Tara Grant, author of The Hidden Plague, says about numerous saponin studies: “It’s evident that consuming saponins can increase your risk for developing bacterial diseases, allergies, and autoimmunity, since bacteria, proteins, and antigens that would normally stay locked up tight within the intestine are free to join up with the saponins and vacation somewhere fun and new, like inside your internal organs.”

    Soy dangers: Soy, which has become one of the largest crops in the world and is used in countless processed foods, is not only high in lectins, but has also been shown to have phyto-estrogenic properties (estrogen-like effects when ingested, in both men and women, that can disrupt normal sex hormone cycles). This is due to the presence of agents called “isoflavones” in soy products. Isoflavones are also believed to cause goiters (an enlargement of the thyroid gland), interfere with normal menstrual cycles, and harm the healthy development of infants who drink soy formula13.

    Furthermore, the USDA confirms that 94 percent of all soy grown in the USA is genetically modified, one major purpose being to make it resistant to the powerful pesticide product called Roundup. This Roundup Ready genetically modified soy has elevated levels of pesticide residue in the form of glycophosphate and its principal breakdown product, Aminomethylphosponic acid (AMPA). Genetically modified soy also shows an inferior nutritional profile to organically grown soybeans. I have to go with Adam on this one.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Mon, Jan 08, 2018 - 4:10am

    #27
    VeganDB12

    VeganDB12

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 18 2008

    Posts: 114

    legumes and soy

    At least one phytoestrogen in soy is weak and may displace some natural estrogen and can have an antiestrogenic effect in breast and uterus which may explain some of the reported benefits in select studies.  This is not medical advice just added information. I can source this but it is easier to give Dr G’s sources he has about 10 in the transcript version of the soy talk. https://nutritionfacts.org/video/who-shouldnt-eat-soy/.  I understand people should talk to their health care providers for advice on any issue. 

    sprouted legumes are great! they can be used like regular legumes in soups and stews and are very easy to cook.

    GMO is a real issue and labeled organic products are safer. I am not being argumentative you make some valid points but it is still a subject under some debate.  I personally prefer fermented soy (tempeh). Adam I promise I will not hijack the thread but just wanted to add info. Have a great day!

    P.S.In the past 6 months I have lost 20 pounds on a high protein lower carb (almost no wheat/sugar) diet and my body fat has dropped 3 percent but that included a rigorous exercise routine. Everyone is different genetically so ymmv.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Mon, Oct 14, 2019 - 6:26pm

    #28

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    Paleo debunked

    Also,

    High carb, low protein diet leads to long healthy life

    http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20190116-a-high-carb-diet-may-explain-why-okinawans-live-so-long

    Carbs are good for you

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Mon, Oct 14, 2019 - 8:11pm

    Reply to #28
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    debunking the debunking of paleo

    Gerry,

    By your criteria, this woman may not be competent to comment on the paleo diet since she is an archaeologist, not a nutritional biochemist.  But by my criteria, I often find that intelligent people entering a field in which they haven’t been brainwashed by “professional” training can often offer valuable insights.  So I will grant that I think she is qualified to comment, at least partially.  Her presentation, however, has more holes than a Swiss cheese warehouse.

    There is a concept called biochemical individuality.  It was first discussed in the 1950s in the titular book by Roger Williams and has been updated in various ways in the ensuing decades.  What it states is that we have individual DNA and genetics and therefore, the diet that may suit one individual or population may not suit another.  For example, Okinawa is at about 26 deg. latitude, a subtropical climate.  Such climates have peoples who function best with relatively high levels of carbohydrate (at least if it’s the correct type of carbohydrate) relative to protein.  But put a Northern European on that diet and most of them will not be as healthy as on a diet with a higher level of protein.  This is even more true for an Inuit who does best consuming a diet made up almost entirely of protein and fat with very little carbohydrate.

    Certainly, people who understand a paleo type diet know that wild game is healthier than most domesticated animals.  Also, domesticated cattle, for example, are much healthier is they are raised on grass than on grains.  Also, they are much healthier if raised on grass from nutrient rich glacial and alluvial soils versus the depleted soils found in most agricultural areas today.

    Paleo people understand that whole, unprocessed, unrefined foods are generally healthier than the opposite so she was actually reinforcing paleo doctrine here.  She discussed dentition but doesn’t seem to understand that we indeed have canines that can tear flesh.  She discussed digestive tracts but failed to note that we don’t have digestive organs like a cow (i.e. rumen, omasum, reticulum).  She said we have to get vitamin C from plants but fails to note how northern indigenous people, whether in Finland or Russia or Alaska or Canada will eat such things as raw reindeer kidney for vitamin C.  She claimed that preservation methods counter bacterial growth but failed to note how one of the healthiest preservation methods, fermentation, actually promotes growth of micro-organisms.  She failed to recognize how much erroneous information has been generated from isotopic studies, not only nitrogen but also carbon and other substances.  In fact, she presents some of the problems in her presentation without recognizing them as such.  She tries to explain them away.  She fails to note how many wild plant foods don’t have less vitamins and minerals than domesticated versions but rather more.  She talks about marrow and organs as if they are separate from eating meat but she doesn’t seem to recognize that paleo people advocate eating organs (from healthy, organic animals) and marrow and, in fact, bone broths made with bones and marrow are recognized as being very beneficial to health.  She’s discussing sugar laden soft drinks but they are most definitely excluded from the paleo diet (as is sugar cane).  I could go on and on but hopefully you get the point and I don’t have to waste more time  Her semi-wild-eyed, somewhat frantic presentation is fairly typical for when people go off half cocked without knowing the facts better.  And she doesn’t know how to spell “virtually”, lol.

    The paper about the Okinawans and 10:1 ratio of carbs to proteins actually makes a very good case for the multiple reasons BESIDES a 10:1 carbohydrate to protein ratio for the longevity of Okinawan peoples.  If you read the paper, you hopefully noted that.  Furthermore, anyone who would look at carbohydrate to protein ratio in isolation is a fool since it is critical to look at the macro-nutrient ratios INCLUSIVE of fat (i.e. proteins, carbohydrates, fats).  It is also critical to look at the TYPE of carbohydrate as well as the types of proteins and the types of fats.  Try being a genetic type that originated north of the 45th parallel and eating a 10:1 carb to protein diet (especially with junky sugary and starchy low micro-nutrient carbs) and you will experience significantly more health issues over the long term than someone consuming a more reasonable ratio.

    I think you’re out of your element discussing nutrition.  Perhaps best to stick to the climate arena.

    And just so you understand, I’m not denying there’s a problem.  But I fall in the category of Tom and Dave and I’D REALLY LIKE TO READ WHAT YOU HAVE TO SAY ABOUT TOM’S EXCELLENT QUESTIONS!!!

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Wed, Oct 16, 2019 - 2:35pm

    #29

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    I shouldn't answer, but ...

    It was first discussed in the 1950s in the titular book by Roger Williams and has been updated in various ways in the ensuing decades

    Typically, you refer back to ancient texts written in an almost pre-scientific era, where randomised, placebo-controlled studies were unknown. Nevertheless, I do know the book and have partially read it. It does NOT make the case that you do, namely that groups (“populations” as you put it) of people have different nutritional needs based on geography. Humans have the same nutritional needs all over the globe. So that’s the first error you make. Individuals within groups may have aversions to certain foods, or like me, even have medical reasons not to eat some foods (I’m celiac). But that’s not the same as claiming that people in warm climates “need” plant based diets and those in cold “need” meat based diets. That’s bullsht. The human is an omnivorous animal that can survive, opportunistically, in any landscape. You can take a northern European and put him in the Tropics, and he’ll be just fine on the local foods. There is no scientific paper suggesting otherwise.

    Paleo diets have been discounted by almost all leading nutritionists. On a personal note, I have lost 30lbs on a diet consisting mainly of carbohydrates. I eat a little sugar every day, because I enjoy it. The diet that works for you is the diet you can tolerate long term. Low carb diets are notorious for being  boring and hard to maintain (I tried one, so I know how true that is).

    I won’t answer you again. Your brain is full of fuzzy ideas and you have a unique talent at grabbing the wrong end of the stick. Life must be hard for you.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Wed, Oct 16, 2019 - 4:28pm

    #30
    Sparky1

    Sparky1

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 21 2016

    Posts: 62

    4+

    GerrySM: Yes, you shouldn't answer...

    …unless you can refrain from insulting PP members in your comments and otherwise disregarding the PP guidelines and rules.  For your convenience and enlightenment, I’ll provide you with the link:   https://www.peakprosperity.com/forum-topic/forum-guidelines-and-rules/

    You’re welcome.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Wed, Oct 16, 2019 - 4:30pm

    Reply to #29
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    3+

    here's a case where you're actually right (while still being wrong)

    You shouldn’t have answered it for once again you’ve proven yourself wrong.  The book mentioned has been updated and is far from the sole source of information on this subject.  You “partially” read it?  My sense is that you may “partially” do other things as well.  Better to do them to completion.  You’ll get more out of them.  I have a personal library with hundreds of volumes and thousands of articles on the subject of nutrition and lectured on it professionally so I think I might have a little advantage over you here.

    Again, you need to brush up on your history more.  The 1950s was hardly an “almost pre-scientific era”.  I don’t think radio, telephones, TV, fixed wing air craft, helicopters, jet engines, rockets, transistors, computers, and nuclear bombs were invented by random happenings (unless you think that’s another component of evolution but with inorganic rather than organic matter).  As an aside, “ancient” texts often contain valuable knowledge and wisdom forgotten or overlooked by modern texts.  Your tendency to dismiss older writing as incorrect or useless is a fallacious assumption.

    Genetics related to the area of indigenous origin most assuredly DOES determine different nutritional needs because area of indigenous origin influences genetics.  Are you dismissing evolution again, lol?  And are you assuming we all have the same genetics?  That’s ludicrous.  Assuming we all have the same genetics with regards to the assimilation and elimination components of digestion is as absurd as assuming we all have the same genetics in terms of our adaptation, resistance, and exhaustion responses with regards to stress.  It’s time to wake up and enter the 21st century Gerry.  I worked in a medical school gastrointestinal physiology laboratory on just these issues.  Ever hear of such things as lactase deficiency?  Do you think there’s a genetic component to your celiac disease?  Of course!  You just proved my point.

    In discussing diets, I never used the word “need”.  Those quote marks are yours, not mine.  I discussed functioning more optimally versus your “be(ing) just fine”.   Humans are indeed omnivorous but there are more optimal diets and less optimal diets, depending upon genetics, environment, etc..  Dietary requirements also change depending upon age and your stage in the life cycle.  In addition, reams of exercise physiology research shows that optimal nutrition changes depending upon the nature, volume, duration, intensity, periodicity, etc. of the physical work loads placed upon the organism.

    It seems like your knowledge of the literature on this subject is a bit thin.  Your statements prove that.  Unfortunately, even the vast majority of professions in the medical field are also unaware of much of this knowledge but that is changing.  In fact, I leveraged this very fact to my advantage and had a very successful career providing exactly this type information and treatments unknown to the majority of professionals.   While most were just beginning to focus on “evidence based” treatments, I had done that years previously, noted its limitations, and decided to incorporate that information but, more importantly, move on to “success based” treatments.  The evidence based crowd typically lags behind cutting edge knowledge by anywhere from 5 to 15 years and that time interval gave me a tremendous leg up on the competition.

    Unlike you, I haven’t had to lose 30 lbs.  My body weight has been very stable for decades, blood chemistries are excellent, blood pressure is low, resting heart rate varies from 50s during the day to as low as 48 at night, and physical performance abilities exceed 99+% of those in my age category.  The diet I’ve followed for years is a variation on the paleo diet.  I don’t eschew all carbs but my carbs are skewed towards the fibrous carbs like vegetables and fruits and away from the sugary and starchy carbs (especially the refined and processed ones) such as those from grains.  You probably need the sugar every day for the serotonin hit, perhaps because you’re not very happy.  I don’t have those cravings.  Furthermore, my diet is far from boring.  I would guess that’s because my wife is a fantastic cook and knows how to use the freshest ingredients, spices, etc. to make consistently delicious meals.  I tell her this every day and she laughs but I know she enjoys hearing it.  She’s the best.

    You know, I never thought about it but perhaps my brain IS full of fuzzy ideas.  Fuzzy logic has numerous advantages over the boolean logic by which you appear to function.  My sense is that you’re a very linear and rigid thinker, unable or unwilling to think outside the box, exercise intuition and creativity, and embrace alternative ideas.  That’s rather sad.

    Life now, in fact, is the easiest in my life.  I’m retired, financially independent,  live in a beautiful part of the world that is a tourist destination for many, travel extensively (including to 32 countries with 10 more on the agenda in the year to come), have excellent health, and have a wonderful family and great friends.  On a personal level, I really could ask for little more.  I wish you the same.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Wed, Oct 16, 2019 - 6:17pm

    #31
    MKI

    MKI

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 12 2009

    Posts: 94

    1+

    Fully agree with Adam; same experiences

    You are 100% spot on this post. Comments:

    1) Yes, diet is 80%. Free weights/sleep are the other 20%

    2) Yes, our diet is like yours: eggs/salmon/meat/veg/olive oil/rice.

    3) 2 meals/day. skip 1 meal/week, and eat as much as we desire.

    4) Books: Nutrition & Physical Degeneration (Price) & Get Serious (Osborn). Both free online.

    5) Supplements: magnesium, iodine, Vit D

    6) Results conclusive. zero cavities in 2-dig fam, perfect BMIs/BP/RHR, muscle, zero calorie restriction.

    90% of diet is ditching processed foods (unless one considers rice & olive oil processed).

    One thing to disagree with: staying fit is not “hard” at all. It’s easy if one just cooks their own food, likes to hunt/fish, and lifts weights 3x week 1 hr, runs 2x week 1/2 hr.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Wed, Oct 16, 2019 - 6:18pm

    #32

    travissidelinger

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Nov 17 2010

    Posts: 81

    1+

    The Potatoe Hack

    Thought I’d share this one.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 2:22am

    Reply to #3

    Mots

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 18 2012

    Posts: 87

    I read some of the articles referred to as promoting the paleo diet.  The articles emphasize insulin resistance but generally lack data on effects of all that saturated fat on heart disease.  One study was referred to as proof that saturated fat in eggs is heart disease neutral.  I read the research article, which actually stated that “daily egg consumption (≥1/d) (versus <7/week) was associated with a 30% higher risk of HF (heart failure)” in the men studied. Since heart failure is the number one cause of death in America, this small fact (one or more eggs per day causing 30% higher heat failures compared merely to those who only ate up to 6 eggs per week) really sticks out, as pertaining to only one food item (not even including trans fat margarine, red meat, cheese etc).
    I note that paleolithic man had a life span of about 30 years and lacked diseases of aging, and that heart disease from saturated fat takes a long time, and generally does not affect morbidity or survival (eg. reproduction) of sub-30 year olds.  I also note that saturated fat is not needed in any human diet as the body’s capacity to synthesize such is trivial.  I further note that cholesterol in diet is fairly irrelevant and those who argue the wonders of saturated fat often point to the lack of effects from dietary cholesterol as their reason.
    I try to stay out of nutrition arguments because people usually scream advertising slogans at me, but wanted to point these facts out due to my worry: so many people close to me have died from heart failure, in fact most.  I prefer a classic Asian diet associated with basically no heart attacks and ischemic strokes, while noting that heart failure has started in Eastern Asia following the introduction of fatty red meat and cheese from America, (ok argue with me that suddenly after all these years with virtually no heart disease people in Japan start to get heart attacks from overwork, as their workweek shrinks by at least a day, they get an extra 10 holidays per year and generally work fewer hours per day).  Insulin problems seem to be under control despite the constant input of rice, although the Paleo diet benefits due to weird glial protein of wheat and arthritis/celiac disease seem to be good points.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 10:10am

    #33
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    1+

    reply to Mots

    Many of these studies are flawed Mots.  Very, very few nutritional studies consider the genetic factor.  And you can never look at one or even a handful of studies in isolation.  And you can’t just read the abstract.  You have to read the study in detail.  And you also have to figure out who funded the study.  There are lots of other variables to consider as well.  Nutrition is actually very difficult to research properly.

    With regards to the quality of research, one of my particular areas of expertise is low back pain and dysfunction.  At least 95% of the studies in this area (and maybe more) are junk and performed by people who just aren’t that knowledgeable on the subject in a comprehensive way (but think they are).  So I take most studies with a grain of salt unless there is a growing preponderance of the best studies supporting a particular idea.

    Eggs are actually one of the healthiest foods you can eat.  But think of your average egg eater in the US.  They have their bacon with eggs or sausage or both, toast with butter (or worse, margarine) and jam, coffee with sugar and milk, sugary orange juice, etc.  Furthermore, the saturated fat in cattle that are fattened with grain is much less healthy than the saturated fat in cattle fed grass from rich soils.  For one, the omega-3 fatty acid content is extremely low in the grain fed and quite high in the grass fed.  It’s one of the reasons buffalo meat is so healthy.  Sugar is a HUGE factor, probably the most important factor dietarily in contributing to poor health.  Populations shifting towards a Western diet of red meat, cheese, etc. almost invariably increase their sugar intake as well.  They also start dropping their vegetable intake as well as dropping whole grain (but not refined grain) and legume content.  It’s the combination of sugar and unhealthy fats with lower micro-nutrient and lower fiber intake that’s the problem.  If you’ve happened to note, such populations as the Chinese are getting taller now that they are getting “better” nutrition.  I use the word “better” loosely because there is obviously an upside (taller, stronger, etc.) with a downside (more Western diseases of civilization).  They are getting more protein and more calories but they are also getting more sugars, trans fats, etc. and less fiber.  So one can approach the problem from the opposite way and combine the best elements of a Western diet and an Eastern diet and wind up with the best of both worlds.  This is why I eat a diversity of protein from wild game, meat, poultry, fish, seafood, and eggs (but little dairy and then only fermented) as well as nuts and seeds but also an abundance and diversity of all different types of vegetables as well as fruits and also many different kinds of spices.  The wheat, corn, soy, sugar, etc. in our Western diet is a particular problem.

    With regards to eggs again, just like with meat, you have to look at what the chickens are eating.  It is very difficult to buy eggs from chickens that have not been fed soy, for example.  But from quality sources, eggs are extremely nutritious.  My grandfather had 3 a day and lived to his 90s.  I have 6 eggs at a time (but remove the yolks from  3) and eat that 3 times a week.  My blood chemistries are perfect.  I can swim a mile in 58 deg. water without fatigue.  All systems are go at 66.

    I’m not sure what you mean by this sentence but if you clarify it, I may be able to better understand what you are saying

    I also note that saturated fat is not needed in any human diet as the body’s capacity to synthesize such is trivial.

    By the way, heart disease from unhealthy eating and stress does not take a long time to form.  Autopsies done on young US soldiers not even out of their teens during the Korean War showed arteriosclerotic streaks and plaques were already forming.

    I’m not legalistic about the paleo diet and don’t necessarily follow every single detail to the letter nor agree with them all to the letter.  But certain advantages of this diet and similar diets, be it Atkins, Zone, South Beach, etc. are undeniable.  Keys are:

    Consider the genetics of your forebearers.  In other words, if you’re an East Asian, I wouldn’t be eating an Inuit diet.  And if you’re Inuit, I wouldn’t be eating an East Asian diet.  Most of us are highly hybridized though making the choices more difficulty but genetic testing to determine the most optimal diet will get better and better.  In the mean time, refining your somatic awareness and sensitivity can improve your ability to discern which foods are good for you and which foods are not.  That’s especially true when you push yourself to physical limits and sensitize yourself to the boundaries of those limits.  This information often becomes very clear.  If you’re doing yoga for example, you’ll notice being a little stiffer if you indulge in sugar.  For some people, at the end of harvest season, when they may be eating a lot of tomatoes, they may feel slightly more achey.  This is especially true of individuals who are nightshade sensitive.  Ditto for the big potato eaters.   You get the picture.

    Eat natural, whole, unrefined, unprocessed foods for the most part (with the exception being certain fermented foods where the “processing” actually increases the health and digestibility of the food).

    Don’t go too extreme on macro-nutrient ratios (in other words, COMPLETELY deleting either carbs or fats) and get plenty of protein but not too much.  Each of these macro-nutrients has their roles.  And consider the type and quality of your macronutrients.  If you are living in a hot climate, lower levels of protein and fat and proteins like leaner fish and poultry may suit you better.  If you are living in an arctic region, then higher levels of protein and fat with red meat and fatty fish may suit you better (but again, with consideration of genetics).

    Consider the soil your food is grown on and the foods the animals you consume eat and the chemicals that might be added to either.  That is a major factor in the health of the foods you eat.

    Always balance and moderation – extremes tend to produce short term results but will create problems in the long term (like the potato hack noted elsewhere).

    The above is not meant to be comprehensive but just thoughts as they came to mind.  Hope this helps.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 3:28pm

    Reply to #33

    Mots

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 18 2012

    Posts: 87

    2+

    its complicated

    AO, I don’t disagree with anything you write.  Re. my sentence about saturated fat requirement, I just pointed  out that saturated fat is not needed in a diet (but polyunsaturates are).
    I too used to lecture on biochemistry and nutrition in my own college biochemistry course.  My favorite topic was molecular logic (differences between plants and animals who evolved their own high lysine vs low lysine proteins, reducing vs non reducing storage sugars, saturated vs unsaturated fats etc in response to environmental challenges: I probably should have written that book I wanted to, maybe you might be interested), including many of the points you have made regarding genetics and differences.  I too, have read hundreds and probably thousands of nutrition research studies based on biochemistry in great detail, often criticizing them in formal seminars with other PhDs and PhD graduate students in a major university and was a nutrition researcher (I discovered the selenium transport protein and won an award for that) for a few years in a major laboratory that among other things discovered the antioxidant vitamin E (we subsequently spent a few million tax dollars trying to prove that antioxidants added to food prevents free radical problems of aging or other damage: all negative results), the selenocysteine t-RNA (and thus separate codon) in one of the top 3 nutrition graduate schools.  I became very disgusted with nutrition research and left that field because I did not want to waste my time.  It has become much worse since then, almost mind numbing how money affects everything.

    The only reason I commented is because I am worried that people I care about are killing themselves with saturated fat. The biochemistry of this problem was worked out a long time ago and is very logical and predictive (the lipoprotein anabolizing and catabolizing enzymes in omnivores and herbavores are designed for more fluid fatty acids than are the same enzymes in carnivores and cannot handle the “harder” saturated fatty acids).  The trans fatty acids found in margarines and many junk foods are even more bizarre and even less natural and the body has even more problems with these, for example.  There are so many complicating factors I don’t want to even begin because I DONT HAVE TIME FOR THIS.  But even the main article cited for how wonderful the paleo diet is cited a study that contradicted a main conclusion.  We went through a similar high fat low carb craze with the Atkins diet 15 years ago until Atkins taught everyone more directly by dying from heart failure, which his widow tried to cover up to keep the book sales going.

    I DO NOT HAVE TIME FOR THIS AND WILL NOT RESPOND AGAIN ON THIS TOPIC

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 4:37pm

    #34

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    Our diets need to change...

    Yes Mots, a medical report issued by the New York medical examiner’s office a year after Atkins’s death showed that Atkins had a history of heart attack, congestive heart failure and hypertension and noted that he weighed 258 pounds at death. His widow refused to allow an autopsy because it is likely that he actually died from a heart attack by suddenly falling over in the street. So his estate has managed to paper over it by claiming he died from hitting his head and suffering a brain clot. Atkins was only 72 as well, relatively young, and quite fat. So much for low carb diets!

    The research I linked above is also compelling. I’ll quote some of it here because it seems to have been ignored:

    New research from the University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre suggests a low protein, high carbohydrate diet may be the most effective for stimulating a hormone with life-extending and obesity-fighting benefits.

    The findings, published today in Cell Metabolism, paint a clearer picture of the role of a little-known hormone called Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) – the so-called ‘fountain of youth’ hormone produced primarily in the liver.

    Previous studies have shown that FGF21 plays a role in curbing appetite, moderating metabolism, improving the immune system and extending lifespan. It is also currently being used as a therapeutic target for diabetes, though little is known about how this hormone is triggered and released in the body.

    Now researchers from the Charles Perkins Centre have found that diets high in carbohydrate and low in protein are the best for boosting levels of FGF21 in mice.

    “Despite the popularity of high protein ‘paleo’ diets, our research suggests the exact opposite may be best for us as we age – that a low protein, high carbohydrate diet was the most beneficial for latelife health and longevity,” said lead author Dr Samantha Solon-Biet.

    Lastly, plant-based diets simply MUST supercede meat and protein based diets if we are to have any hope of controlling global heating. For example, beef is more than 100 times as emissions-intensive as legumes. BTW I eat a LOT of baked goods made from legume flour, specifically lentil flour, home made. I have no unusual gas, and my bowel motions are normal.

    Change your diet to combat climate change in 2019

    And if you are not ready for a meat-free diet, try a “flexitarian” diet. This diet includes plenty of fruits, vegetables and plant-based protein sources including legumes, soybeans and nuts, along with modest amounts of poultry, fish, milk and eggs, and small amounts of red meat.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 6:25pm

    Reply to #33
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    1+

    thanks Mots for that great reply

    You obviously know your stuff and are probably more knowledgeable on the research end than I am.  When I was young, I relied heavily upon research and the formal codified knowledge base.  But as I got older (and hopefully wiser), I realize that the research did not always guide me in the right direction.  In fact, it sometimes downright failed me.  I began exploring intuition, tacit knowledge, and non-linear thinking more and studied psychophysical approaches that enhanced my capabilities in this area.  As you know, the path of science takes many twists and turns, most which are usually beyond our ability to predict.  We know about the multiple historical examples of the individual who comes along and upsets the knowledge apple cart and changes the course of history as a result.  The insight that yielded that dramatic revelation usually had intuition and tacit knowledge at its foundation.  And so I learned to study my own body, those of patients, and real world examples for information as much as from the formal research.  Interestingly, science often came along at a later date and proved what I had earlier intuited.

    I learned to eat food that was good for me, not just food that tasted good.  In other words, I tried to avoid emotion driving my eating choices … whether using food as psychological medication, food to ameliorate boredom, food to take the place of something else missing in my life, etc.  I’m sure the baked goods that Gerry is eating taste good but the question remains, are they good for you?  I have to say, with over four decades of clinical experience, I’ve never seen anyone who daily consumed a significant amount of baked goods to be truly healthy.  Not one.  They may be out there but I never saw them.

    As you well realize, nutrition is a field that is rife with confusion and contradiction.  We’re still learning and that includes myself.  Nutrition is a “sloppy” field and not as precise as electrical engineering.  It’s interesting the path you followed.  I went from considering a career in electrical engineering (and being good at math but not loving math) to changing to the human sciences.  You’ve seem to have done the opposite.  To each their own.  I’ll comment on the Atkins issue in another post.  Thanks for taking time out of your schedule to answer.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 6:41pm

    Reply to #34
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    1+

    to Mots and Gerry on Atkins

    I don’t know if you gentlemen realize it, but Atkins didn’t necessarily follow the Atkins diet closely.  I lived in the NYC metro area more than half my life, commuted into NYC for years, and rubbed shoulders with patients who rubbed shoulders with Atkins.  So I have it on good authority.  Also, he didn’t originate the Atkins diet.  Carleton Fredericks did.  But while Fredericks didn’t recommend it to everyone, Atkins just about did.  And as you may well realize, Atkins was highly incentivized by the wealth aspect of his diet whereas I think Fredericks was more interested in seeking the scientific truth.  Also, do we know if the Atkins diet was genetically suited to Atkins?  I don’t.  Also, do we know at what age he adopted the diet?  I don’t.   We do know he liked the good life so early bad habits may not have been overcome by later dietary change.  I know a lot of physicians and a surprising number of them are not healthy and do not eat well.  Years ago, my mother baby sat for a physician’s four sons.  She came home appalled that he thought pizza was a healthy supper for his children.  He said it contained the 4 major food groups: grains (i.e. dough), dairy (i.e. cheese), vegetable (i.e. tomato sauce), and meat (i.e. pepperoni).  She wasn’t joking and neither was he!

    We also know that even if you have a so-called perfect diet, stress can wreak havoc on multiple organ systems (including your cardiovascular system).  In addition, the cortisol released as a response to stress is likely to make you gain weight much more easily and become fat.  Doctors are under a lot of stress, nowadays more than ever.  The two jobs you couldn’t give to me anymore including be being a medical doctor and being a cop.  Tough jobs that are becoming increasingly thankless.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 7:16pm

    Reply to #34
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    1+

    genetics, Gerry, genetics and doesn't baking=heat

    Years ago, I played with all different diets.  I fasted, did intermittent fasting, did meal spacings and volumes, juggled macro-nutrient ratios, juggled calories from hypo- to hypercaloric, etc.  I simply DO NOT feel good or function well on a 10:1 carb:protein ratio.  Sorry, but that’s just the way it is.  Now maybe someone who is eating a lot of soy and raising their estrogen levels (and lowering their testosterone levels) and doing minimal or light exercise (and not high intensity, high load exercise) may do fine on that.  I don’t know.  But doing what I do in this body, it doesn’t work for me.

    I was also a vegetarian for a couple of years and had good endurance but seemed to lose peak strength and also seemed vulnerable to coming down with colds and other minor infections.  I was also more prone to injury.  And when I dropped my fat intake real low, although I had only 4% body fat and great muscle definition, I also noted I started losing hair.  Overall, I just never felt as healthy as when I had some animal protein in my diet.

    Let me pose a few queries here.  You’re eating a LOT of baked goods?  Doesn’t baking consume energy?  And doesn’t energy consumption heat the planet?  Why not adopt a raw foods diet?

    Now I know cattle produce a lot of methane but don’t other ruminants also?  Are you saying you wouldn’t like to see buffalo herds come back in the Great American West or large reindeer herds to the northern climates and central Asia or vast herds of wildebeast, water buffalos, etc. in Africa, and so on?  They’re all part of the ecosystem.  And guess what?  They’re all gonna die some day.  Can we possibly compete with other predators for some of that meat?  How about eating rats?  The little buggers are all over the place and compete with us for the plant foods.  The Southeast Asians love ’em.  I know I’d eat ’em in a pinch and, under the right circumstances, I might even develop a taste for them.

    What about nomadic peoples?   I think it’d be rather tough for them to get rid of their animals and rely on carrying around fields or planters that are not very portable.  There are lots of factors to consider before we start dictating diets to our fellow inhabitants of this planet.

    I get very uncomfortable with imperatives … we MUST makes me feel a little uneasy.  I have no problem with you doing what your conscience or science or whatever guides you to do.  But I would get uncomfortable when someone starts telling me what I should eat.  Besides, have you ever tried to dictate to people what they should eat?  It’s like trying to get them to change their religious belief or political affiliation.  Good luck!

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Thu, Oct 17, 2019 - 11:43pm

    #35

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    Sigh

    You’re eating a LOT of baked goods? Doesn’t baking consume energy? And doesn’t energy consumption heat the planet? Why not adopt a raw foods diet?

    AO, I generate more power than I use from my solar panels. I also have a solar oven.

    Your anecdotes about feeling unwell on soy point to a similar problem to me: I cannot tolerate soy in any form. Individual people may have food intolerances, which are quite different to allergies and quite difficult to identify. I have a long list of foods I avoid. I recommend the book on food intolerances by Dr Jonathan Brostoff to you (a bit out of date now, but very useful to me).

    Cattle vs bison? There were about 20 million bison before Europeans arrived in America, versus the ~100 million cattle now in the US. And cattle produce about 2x the amount of methane that bison do. There are studies showing that bison were net carbon sequesterers.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 1:55am

    #36

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3233

    1+

    weight, diet; my experience

    I’m going to second ao’s observation on the use of “internal sense” (he calls it intuition) in diet and weight control.

    I think my weight peaked in my late 20s – I was 5-9 and 180 pounds.  I got upset at being chubby, and responded by trying lots of different diets, which worked to varying degrees, but all of them required constant exercises in willpower.  At least they did for me.  My exercise varied between weights, cardio, and eventually martial arts, but I was always maybe 10 pounds over weight.  I mean, when I trained for a fight (which involved running every day – I hate running, sadly) I was able to drop down to 150 pounds, but I just couldn’t maintain that level of intensity, and so my weight moved back up to 165-174 (75-79 kg) which is where my steady-state was (with constant struggle) until…

    Well until recently.  Part of it involved guided meditation on releasing all the stuff surrounding unhealthy food addictions.  It took a while (a year?  maybe two?) to take effect, but eventually I got in tune with my body, and now when I see and smell fried chicken I know it would taste good, but my body gives me a message that it doesn’t really want that.  It doesn’t take effort or “diet”.  I just feel a vague sense of unease, and I go with it – I just avoid buying that food item.  As a result, without any exercise of willpower or struggle I have been able to give up a lot of the foods that probably weren’t helping me.

    And now I’m at 156-160 (71-73 kg), maintained with no real effort – weights 2-3 times per week, and sporadic martial arts training which even after 15 years I still enjoy.  I eat a lot of stir fry (vegetables, pork, rice noodles in various combinations) and every day I have oatmeal for breakfast (organic, make it myself in a big pot) with some coconut sugar and passion fruit and butter.  And some cream too.  It is very tasty – probably more carbs than I “should” have.  But it doesn’t seem to matter.

    I also have given up most processed foods.  It too was not an exercise in will; my body just told me it didn’t like it.  The sausages I used to love and eat every day just two years ago – my body doesn’t want them anymore.

    The “dropping away” of the ultraprocessed foods was a process too.  It happened “organically” rather than some sort of effort, plan, or exercise of will.  I slowly just stopped buying them when I went shopping.

    Also – my quantity control seems better now.  I’ll have the weekly steak (about 8 oz of tenderloin, peppercorn sauce, potato wedges, and vegetables) but I can’t even finish the steak.  My body doesn’t really want more than about 6 oz.  I save the rest for later.  I get full really fast.  And then I stop eating.  I don’t go for pasta that often.  Sometimes I’ll make a 4-cheese sauce and put it on ravioli, but my body doesn’t want too many ravioli.  So I save it for later.  Sashimi is good – I can eat more of that than steak.  But that’s maybe once a week too.

    Supplements: CoQ10, Curcumin, fish oil, NAC+glycine, bone broth.

    Could I have done this in my 20s?  Could I have “tuned in” to my body back then?  Maybe.  Who knows!  I didn’t have the tools back then, so its hard to know.

    Here’s a fun recent study done at NIH that confirms that eating ultraprocessed foods lead to weight gain – possibly because those foods don’t send the “I’m full” signal to the brain.  Avoiding said foods can either be an act of struggle and willpower, as it used to be with me, or maybe you can find a way to get in tune with your body, and perhaps your process will become more effort free.

    https://www.nih.gov/news-events/news-releases/nih-study-finds-heavily-processed-foods-cause-overeating-weight-gain

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 5:01am

    Reply to #35
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    1+

    lots of problems with soy

    Just to clarify Gerry, if you go back and read, I never said I feel unwell with soy.  Actually, I tolerate soy pretty well.  I’m just not interested in having its phytoestrogenic effects influence my body.  There are significant other problems with soy that go beyond food intolerance.  I’ll leave it to you to Google information on that.

    With regards to the solar cells, they certainly sound nice and I think, in general, they’re a plus.  Ditto with the solar oven.  But in areas with heavy cloud cover, the solar oven is next to unusable and solar cell output diminishes dramatically.  Plus, there is the carbon footprint of manufacturing and transporting those solar cells and then the disposal problem when their efficiency drops over the course of 25 years.  There’s no free lunch.  This is why I have to chuckle at the folks who buy their hybrids.  Now they’re producing a carbon footprint for manufacturing TWO motors, gas and electric, not just one.  And even more damaging is the manufacture of that big old battery and then its eventual replacement and disposal.  They are no where near as environmentally “gentle” as many would have us believe.

    With regards to cattle, many of them are grazed on land that is unfit for agriculture yet can support cattle.  So they allow food production from areas that could not generally produce much plant food fit for human consumption.  Cattle convert cellulose into meat and milk.  Unfortunately, our bodies don’t.  Plus, they are mobile, unlike fields of crops.  They can be moved to areas where needed and they won’t rot on the vine or in the field.  They can be especially valuable in getting one through a collapse situation because of this mobility.  They can also get one through cold weather times when crops are not being produced.  So I wouldn’t be so quick to dismiss cattle and meat.

    And if you got on a raw foods diet, you could use your power to reduce the carbon foot print of others.  Nothing like sharing our abundance with our fellow man.

     

    One of the things that concerns me about the climate change movement is the big push for carbon taxes.  I just looked at a site that a local person is writing for and the article they were promoting was one promoting carbon taxes.  On that same site, no where did a see an article pushing for a global program for planting trees.  I know there are parties promoting this but not very heavily.  In WW2 for example, there was heavy promotion among both the Allies and the Axis for conserving strategically important materials.  School children were mobilized to achieve these ends and to mobilize their parents as well for the same purpose.  Yet in the media, I see next to nothing about getting school children, college students, adults, seniors, etc. out to plant trees on a massive scale.  We know collapse is related to deforestation.  A global initiative to plant trees would sequester carbon, stabilize soils, build soils, purify the air, create wildlife habitat, cool the environment, etc.  Yet next to nothing.  It’s carbon taxes, carbon taxes, carbon taxes.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 6:02am

    #37
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    1+

    exactly Dave - cognition+interoception+self discipline=success

    When I talk about intuition and somatic awareness, especially with regards to selecting the best foods for your unique physiology and genetics, the type of somatic awareness I’m technically referring to is called interoception.  You have developed a heightened awareness in that area.  The combination of this more highly attuned interoception and self discipline is what you used to control your weight and improve your health.  Congratulations!  You are one of the rare few.  Dave, if you could develop a way to package and teach that skill to groups, you would have an incredible income stream that would probably surpass anything you’re doing now.  Come to think of it, maybe I should work on this in retirement.:-)

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 9:04am

    Reply to #37

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3233

    interoception

    ao-

    Well that’s a new word.  Interoception.  I like having a science-y word that helps me think its not just a bunch of woo-woo.  🙂

    I’m a total believer in this sense – because I have it now, and I didn’t have it before.

    More examples: apparently, chocolate squares are ok, but the line is drawn at more than one butter cookie.  And even that butter cookie isn’t ideal.  I can tell.  Who knows why?  I just go with it because it seems to work better than what went on before.  I try to tell them every day – “cells”, I tell them, “we’re doing just great!”  They seem to like hearing that.  They even like it when I write it here.  And indeed, when I went in for my physical – first one in maybe 6 years – the numbers were all great.  Engineers like data.  Its like we can’t completely believe in something until we see the data.

    I think you are right.  If I could bottle this and sell it…it is a really powerful teaching.  A (theoretically) reproducible method for teaching how to individually sense what’s best for your own physiology?  Now that’s real agency.  It kind of sounds like “trust yourself.”  🙂

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 9:25am

    Reply to #37

    Quercus bicolor

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 230

    1+

    interoception. I'm in!

    First to get better at it and remembering to pay attention more often.

    And then to help others learn it.

    I think it would go hand in hand with resolving traumas, large and small that lead to eating addictions.

    Just think, we could be interoception coaches!

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 1:20pm

    #38

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    Intuition vs calories

    Plenty of things about nutrition are non-intuitive. I rely on food science and calorie counting, and it’s worked well for me. (Cue long diatribes about how it hasn’t worked for you, facepalm).

    We currently live in a world seemingly gripped by “feel-pinions”, where facts are casually dismissed in pursuit of pre-determined agendas. The “intuition” approach to nutrition is one more example of this. The thrust is that science is secondary to how one feels, with the implied message that climate scientists can be ignored as well.

    Regarding tree planting, everyone knows about that and a lot of it is being done, but it’s essentially impractical as a cure-all for global heating. Vast areas of land cannot simply be turned back into forest without taking the land out of agricultural use.

    Carbon taxes are everywhere talked about, but rarely used. They are desperately needed. If you have any belief in capitalism and the efficiency of markets, you’d be a carbon tax supporter.

    Solar panels provide back far more energy than is used in their manufacture, and they save a load of CO2 going into the air from coal/gas burning. And although spurious claims persist online that solar panels never generate as much energy in their lifetime as is used in their production, the time it takes for a modern solar panel to recoup its “embodied energy” is minimal. “It’s between six and 18 months depending on where it’s made and the way it’s made, for a 25-year life. So for 95 per cent of the life of the PV system it’s energy positive,” Professor Blakers says.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2017-11-19/offgrid-may-not-be-as-green-as-it-seems/9154266

    Moreover, there is no major problem with pollution from panels, and certainly nothing compared to fossil fuels.

    A general comment, not in reference to anyone here, but worth noting: usually anyone pushing an anti-solar or anti-wind agenda on the internet is probably working directly or indirectly for fossil fuel interests. I’ve come across people like this on many sites on the net. The modus operandi is to join up at influential sites (PeakProsperity is one of them) and become part of the commentariat, making numerous posts, setting up alliances with some other frequent commenters, sometimes using numerous accounts by using a browser like Tor and switching between IPs to comment in support of their own comments, the list goes on. This phenomenon has been studied and discussed extensively at other sites. There was one site that banned posting from Tor and VPNs and saw the climate denier posts virtually disappear. The fossil fuel industry is the world’s most profitable industry, so really it would be quite surprising if it did not engage in this sort of dirty pool to protect its interests.

    Just be aware, gentle reader, that all is not always what is seems on the net.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 2:01pm

    Reply to #38

    Quercus bicolor

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 230

    1+

    Reply to Gerry

    We currently live in a world seemingly gripped by “feel-pinions”, where facts are casually dismissed in pursuit of pre-determined agendas. The “intuition” approach to nutrition is one more example of this. The thrust is that science is secondary to how one feels, with the implied message that climate scientists can be ignored as well.

    I totally agree with you when it comes to things like climate for which there has never been a compelling short-term, actionable relationship to individual human survival and reproduction.   In addition, climate forcing is way to complex, beyond our ability to directly perceive for feelings to add any value to understanding them.

    For nutrition, however there is a clear and compelling relationship to survival and reproduction that goes way back in our ancestry to before we were human or even mammals.  Would you be willing to try on the theory that Dave’s and ao have begun to cut through the muddle of modern, western, lost-in-our-thoughts-and-our-head confusion to connect to that animal part of ourselves that knows exactly what foods are best for our health and how much of them?

    “It’s between six and 18 months depending on where it’s made and the way it’s made, for a 25-year life.

    If other inputs beyond manufacture are considered, the recovery time is longer, but still worth it.  However, rooftop panels have a considerably higher input energy to output energy ratio due to their smaller scale and often less-than-ideal siting.  This is even more true when the large incentives encourage people to install very poorly sited panels in cloudy climates.   I’m sure there are many installations out there that never should have been installed based on an EROEI analysis.  The issue of managing the grid or shifting to microgrids with more intermittent power (or at least not always as much as we want in the moment) is another story, as is maintaining the solar industry throughout the supply chain without fossil fuel inputs.

    Carbon taxes are everywhere talked about, but rarely used. They are desperately needed. If you have any belief in capitalism and the efficiency of markets, you’d be a carbon tax supporter.

    Yes, if the tax is totally and equally refundable to all citizens and is carefully crafted to prevent skimmers and speculators from getting their fingers in the stream of cash.  I’m not sure this is easy or even possible in practice, though.

    A general comment, not in reference to anyone here, but worth noting: usually anyone pushing an anti-solar or anti-wind agenda on the internet is probably working directly or indirectly for fossil fuel interests.

    Agreed.  How do we find a way to have a nuanced discussion about the shortcomings of solar and wind that we may or not be able to fully or partially address without those fossil fuel interests dominating the conversation?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 4:09pm

    #39
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    2+

    intuition guiding science, calorie counting deficiencies, and sundries

    Gerry, I hope you realize that intuitive insights have largely guided the path of science.  Or as was stated in the novel Dune, “Empiricism adjusts the path of science behind it”.  Logic and prevailing science say one thing but someone has an intuitive insight and then does research based on that insight and using it to guide the direction of their research and discovers that the prevailing science was wrong.  That’s how science advances.  Haven’t we seen that reversal of scientific opinion when science dramatically changed their opinion from global cooling and an imminent Ice Age in a decade or two to global warming?

    As an example, calorie counting has been losing scientific credibility as an accurate way to guide your eating.  Let’s look at the example of the person who is consuming a diet soft drink.  The drink has zero calories but the person is gaining rather than losing weight by drinking it.  The calorie model failed.  The reason it failed is because of the altered hormonal response caused by the aspartame or other artificial sweetener which alters the metabolism of the individual and causes them to gain weight instead of lose weight, as had been advertised.  Also, calories tell you nothing about the quality of the food.  And practically speaking, in the real world setting (not in the laboratory), most calorie counts aren’t even that accurate.  Do you weigh every piece of food that goes in your mouth?  I doubt it.  Also, do you realize that the chemical composition of foods of the same name can vary based on the particular variety of the food and where and how it was grown and these factors are usually overlooked with calorie counting?.

    The more one can cultivate sensory sensitivity, the better off they will be in almost every area of life.  Just as individuals who have impaired interoceptive sensitivity will have difficulties with maintaining their weight, so too individuals who have impaired kinesthetic awareness and proprioceptive sensitivity will tend to have more orthopedic damage and pains because of using their body improperly.  By cultivating that sensitivity, you are better guided in correct actions, whether those actions are eating or moving or whatever.  I think you are conflating emotional “feelings” (which are often inaccurate) with “feeling sensitivity” (such as the aforementioned interoceptive and proprioceptive sensitivity).  You can look up such things as the Weber-Fechner law (for sensory stimuli discrimination) and the Arndt-Schultz law (as applied to sensitivity to physical stimulation, not sensitivity to chemical  stimulation) to begin to get a better understanding of these phenomena.

    Even in the area of unarmed combat, greater sensitivity allows one to anticipate, feel, receive, redirect, and transmit movement and force more efficiently and effectively to overcome an opponent.  It is the basis for many martial arts, from Aikido to Wing Chun kung fu to Systema, etc.  When you study such arts, you get a real world, practical, no bullsh*t education in how this works.  Do it wrong and you get hit and hurt.  Do it right and you nullify and neutralize your opponent.  You can’t fake this.

    If you’ve ever read Gavin DeBecker’s book, The Gift of Fear, he explains how when you get that gut feeling that something is wrong and dangerous (as in interacting with a stranger and wondering about the stranger’s intentions towards you), trust that feeling because it is almost invariably correct.  That has been shown to be true again and again.  Tom can probably discuss this subject more at length than I.

    For what it’s worth, I am very much in favor of solar power but it’s lack of constancy concerns me.  We have winter storms blow in where it can snow hard for days.  You have two problems there.  One, the sky is darker so you’re getting less power just when you need it more.  Two, you have to work to keep your solar cells clear of snow.  I know because I have friends with solar power and they have these problems.  That’s when fossil fueled power, whether from the grid or from a home generator, comes in handy.  On a more apocalyptic note, whether it is atmospheric particles, dust, and debris from a volcano, from a nuclear exchange, from a celestial body impact, from a massive fire, or whatever, all of these scenarios results in a considerable darkening of the sky.  So when you need the power the most, you don’t have it.

    As for your carbon taxes, out of politeness, I’ll refrain from telling you what you can do with them.  Such thinking plays perfectly into the hands of your Wall Street masters.   Who do you think is going to profit enormously from managing carbon credit exchanges, which will be the largest and most lucrative security exchanges in history?  These people don’t give a rip about you, about me, about the people, about the environment, about the planet.  THEY DON’T GIVE A RIP!!!  They want your money, clear and simple.  If you want to donate, fine.  I will fight it tooth and nail.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 5:00pm

    Reply to #37
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    1+

    great idea, Quercus

    I like the concept of an interoception coach!  The coaching could be done individually but could probably be done in a group setting as well.  There is definitely a need.

    You hit the nail on the head with “I think it would go hand in hand with resolving traumas, large and small that lead to eating addictions.”  In the course of my professional career, I’ve been astounded to learn how much sexual abuse occurs in our society.  It is epidemic.  The last year I worked, I had multiple cases like this but with two women in particular, the level of abuse was so horrendous, I had to fight back the tears listening to their stories.  That’s how bad they were.  I wish I could erase the things out of my mind that they told me but that’s not possible.  The average person simply has no idea of the horror and the suffering that family members and so-called “friends” can inflict on innocent children and on into their adolescent years and even into early adulthood.  One of the things that happens to a woman who is abused (and I know men are abused as well but it’s not as common and has its own unique set of problems) is that she naturally (both consciously and unconsciously) seeks to protect herself.  One way she will do this is by overeating.  It accomplishes several things in her mind.  It makes her physically less attractive.  It also literally creates a physical wall (of fat) around her and “protects” her.  And of course, there’s the self medication component.  She will also tend to block out “feelings” of all sorts and, as a result, her interoceptive, proprioceptive, and other forms of sensitivity can become impaired.  The re-education process is slow because the trauma is profound and the protection is understandably not readily relinquished.  The numbers of woman who have somatic pain contributed to by sexual (and, of course, physical) abuse is, quite frankly, enormous.

    There is both psychotherapy and physical therapy for these problems but there is really no professional licensure for a psychophysical therapist and, as a result, many of these woman fall between the cracks.  An interoceptive coach is a wonderful idea and could possibly provide a less threatening intervention when dealing with a problem that is all too often encumbered by misplaced guilt and shame.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 5:52pm

    #40

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    Feel-pinions left and right

    I’m sure there are many installations out there that never should have been installed based on an EROEI analysis.

    Proof? This has the whiff of a feel-pinion.

    I’m not sure this is easy or even possible in practice, though.

    As of 2018, at least 27 countries and subnational units have implemented carbon taxes. Research shows that carbon taxes effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    How do we find a way to have a nuanced discussion about the shortcomings of solar and wind that we may or not be able to fully or partially address without those fossil fuel interests dominating the conversation?

    Anonymous discussions on the ‘net are always going to be susceptible to infiltration by astroturfing fossil fuel interests. Sadly.

    Haven’t we seen that reversal of scientific opinion when science dramatically changed their opinion from global cooling and an imminent Ice Age in a decade or two to global warming?

    Not really. There was never much support for the cooling theory.

    The calorie model failed.

    No, the calorie model did not fail, but more science (not feel-pinions) allowed us to understand that artificial sweeteners can increase insulin levels. Incidentally, the sweetener I use, which has no effect on my weight, is erythritol.

    Do you weigh every piece of food that goes in your mouth? I doubt it.

    Wrong again, AO! I have a postal scale the measures within 1 gram accuracy, and a list of the foods I commonly eat showing their calories/gram amount. It’s trivial to weigh the food, multiply by cal/gram, and get the total. Been doing it for 20 years!

    Solar panels don’t work in rainy climates? They work just fine in Germany. There is no alternative in the long run to renewables, so it’s pointless jabbering on about how great fossil fuels are. People who knock renewables like this are usually dyed-in-the-wool deniers. Maybe if you added a battery to store energy you’d be able to get through the dark sky days? I mean, like I do. Next you’ll be telling me that’s no good either because of the long dark periods you experience. Sigh.

    Who do you think is going to profit enormously from managing carbon credit exchanges, which will be the largest and most lucrative security exchanges in history?

    So now you are confusing emissions trading schemes with carbon taxes. You are quite fuzzy on some key issues. To help you, here’s James Hansen on a carbon tax:

    A “carbon tax with 100 percent dividend” is needed to reverse the growth of atmospheric CO2. The tax, applied to oil, gas and coal at the mine or port of entry, is the fairest and most effective way to reduce emissions and transition to the post fossil fuel era. It would assure that unconventional fossil fuels, such as oil shale and tar sands, stay in the ground, unless an economic method of capturing the CO2 is developed. The entire tax should be returned to the public, equal shares on a per capita basis (half shares for children up to a maximum of two child – shares per family), deposited monthly in bank accounts. No bureaucracy is needed. A tax should be called a tax. The public can understand this and will accept a tax if it is clearly explained and if 100 percent of the money is returned to the public. Not one dime should go to Washington for politicians to pick winners. No lobbyists need be employed. The public will take steps to reduce their emissions because they will continually be reminded of the matter by the monthly dividend and by rising fossil fuel costs. It must be clearly explained to the public that the tax rate will continue to increase in the future. When fuel prices decline, the tax should increase, to retain the incentive for transitioning to the post-fossil-fuel-era. The effect of reduced fossil fuel demand will be lower fossil fuel prices, making the tax a larger and larger portion of energy costs (for fossil fuels only). Thus the country will stop hemorrhaging its wealth to oil-producing nations . Tax and dividend is progressive. A person with several large cars and a large house will have a tax greatly exceeding the dividend. A family reducing its carbon footprint to less than average will make money. Everyone will have an incentive to reduce their carbon footprint. The dividend will stimulate the economy, spur innovation, and provide money that allows people to purchase low-carbon products and a low-carbon lifestyle . A carbon tax is honest, clear and effective. It will increase energy prices, but low and middle income people, especially, will find ways to reduce carbon emissions so as to come out ahead. The rate of infrastructure replacement, thus economic activity, can be modulated by how fast the carbon tax rate increases. Effects will permeate society. Food requiring lots of carbon emissions to produce and transport will become more expensive and vice versa, encouraging support of nearby farms as opposed to imports from half way around the world. Beware of alternative approaches, such as ‘percent emission reduction goals’ and ‘cap and trade’. These are subterfuges designed to allow business-as-usual to continue, under a pretense of action, a greenwashing. Hordes of lobbyists will argue for these approaches, which assure their continued employment. The ineffectiveness of ‘goals’ and ‘caps’ is made blatantly obvious by the fact that the countries promoting them are planning to build more coal-fired power plants. If the United States accedes to the ineffectual ‘goals’ and ‘caps’ approach, a continuation of the Kyoto Protocol approach, it will practically guarantee disastrous climate change. Instead it should persuasively argued that other countries also adopt tax and dividend. The countries agreeing to this approach will also agree that imports from a country that does not apply a comparable carbon tax will be taxed at the port of entry. That import tax will be a strong incentive for all countries to participate. A carbon tax is necessary but not sufficient. By itself a carbon tax cannot solve the energy problem and allow rapid coal phase-out. There also must be better efficiency standards in building codes, for vehicles, and in appliances and electronics. Profit incentives for utilities must be changed, so as to encourage efficiency as opposed to selling as much energy as possible. These are only examples of the many things to be done. But all of these things will be done easier and more effectively in the presence of a carbon tax. Indeed, a carbon tax is essential. It is the tool that will impact people’s decisions and lifestyle choices for the short-term, middle-term and long-term, allowing the world to move as gracefully as possible to the post-fossil-fuel-era. In this way we will leave in the ground the hardest to extract fossil fuels as we move rapidly to clean energy sources of the future

     

     

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 7:05pm

    Reply to #40
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    3+

    more distortion to make wrong right

    Gerry, why do you so frequently say I said something I didn’t say?  I never said solar cells don’t work in a rainy climate.  I’m quite aware of Germany’s situation.  I was there in June 2012 when they broke records for electrical power production from solar which I think is great.  I was talking about prolonged winter snow storms and how the efficiency of solar cells was reduced under such circumstances, both from dense cloud cover and from snow cover.  Please try to be more accurate about what I say.

    You could have fooled me about the cooling theory.  From your chart, it looks like there were twice as many papers published on cooling as on warming in 1971 when the hysteria reached its peak and folks like you were claiming we’d have an Ice Age in the 1980s.  By the way, do recognize the problem with that chart?  Let’s see if you can figure that one out without me telling you.

    The calorie model most definitely did fail.  You need to familiarize yourself with more contemporary information and move forward from your dated ideas.  Eating a sugar alcohol like erythritol is going to cause you problems.  I know, I know.  Science is telling you it’s safe.  Corporate science that is, the science that always talks its own book.  The same heavily funded corporate science that has told us that Vioxx was safe, synthetic fats were safe, glyphosate was safe, and on and on, ad nauseum.  I’m just surprised you’re so gullible and sucked in by corporation pseudoscience.  I also think you’re deluding yourself with using an artificial sweetener and thinking it’s healthy.  Sugar alcohols are NOT healthy.  BTW, why are you using erithritol?  Are you a Type 1 or type 2 diabetic?

    I’m sure those carbon taxes will be fully returned to the public, right after the tooth fairy gets through paying off the national debt.  Like the taxes levied to fund various educational initiatives that somehow never got to the schools?  Yep, we’ll spend all that money from taxes on casinos for education.  Yep, all that we paid into Social Security will be kept in that fund and only used for social security.  How many taxes in history went 100% to the public for the purposes they supported and only those purposes?  Very, very few.  It’s time to stop believing in fairy tales and wake up to the real world.  You don’t think they’re going to make “adjustments” to how the carbon taxes are levied and administered such that the promises will never match the reality?  I guarantee you they will!

    Gerry, you’ve been accusing others of being shills for various industries but I’m beginning to seriously wonder about you being in that role yourself.

    But thank you for providing me with a bit of levity.  I guessed that you might be the type of person who actually DID weigh their food and I was right.  Personally, I’d be embarrassed to even admit that fact, lol.  I would love to see the faces of relatives, friends, and restaurant patrons when you waltz in with your little postal scale and put it to work, lol.  Doesn’t that get a little messy and confusing with soups and stews?  Sorry but I just spit up my drink all over the screen visualizing that scene, LOL.  Well, bless your little heart.  You are trying hard to do the right thing!  I just hope you don’t get too badly burned with your naivete and child-like trust in what so-called authorities are telling you.

    Just a bit of speculation here.  Are you stiff in your joints and movements?  Are you less flexible than the average person?  I would guess so.  Would like to know the reason why and how to change that?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 7:13pm

    Reply to #40

    mememonkey

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Nov 01 2009

    Posts: 108

    4+

    Blinded by Science

    97% of Phrenologists agree, that skull bumps correlate with intellectual development and personality traits!

     

    No, the calorie model did not fail, but more science (not feel-pinions) allowed us to….

    Gerry,

    Your own statement here embodies the tautology that proves AO’s and other’s points that conventional scientific wisdom  is subject to a shifting, sometimes nonlinear process of evolution.    Science is after all, just a useful tool, a method for furthering understanding.  Don’t confuse the map with the territory.

    And its irrefutabley demonstrable that some of the great scientists and scientific discoveries and paradigm shifts were guided by intuition and for lack of a better term “divine inspiration”

    Perhaps you don’t know how abrasive and obnoxious your style of communication is but I for one can assure you that if you are trying to change hearts and minds and influence people you are going about it in the wrong way.

    Frankly,  I don’t know why people even engage with you at this point you clearly don’t have the intellectual horsepower to address the substance of their critiques. Rather you deflect to self referential assertions and you don’t even have the ability to do it civilly.

    Of course that is just a “feel- pinion”

     

    mm

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 8:01pm

    Reply to #40

    Quercus bicolor

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 230

    3+

    Gerry, I would really appreciate it if you approached this as a respectful conversation where we are doing our best to expand our understanding through the interchange of ideas.  When you picked the point below to respond to and mentioned the whiff of a feel-pinion, I guessed that you were more looking for what you took for my weakest statement so that you could take it down.  I find this type of conversation frustrating and not of much value. I’m really not interested in adversarial conversations.

    I would love it if you would address my first point about the evolutionary value of an animal having the ability to find and consume the appropriate mix and quantities of high quality foods through delicately tuned sensory feedback loops and internal assessment of body states.  I’m really hoping that you read this statement and the original one in which I phrased it differently and try it on as an idea.  I’m guessing it would seem plausible enough for you to consider it further.  I’m also hoping that you will consider my assertion that this same ability is not useful in assessing the reality of not of human induced global warming.

    I’m sure there are many installations out there that never should have been installed based on an EROEI analysis.

    Proof? This has the whiff of a feel-pinion.

    Here is my best effort at proof: I know of several rooftop installations in my town on steep west facing roofs with tall trees that shade them nearly fully by 3 hours before sunset.  I know of one on a northeast facing roof and several more on south facing roofs with trees tall enough that the sun doesn’t shine directly on them at all for about half the year.  I am in the renewable forecasting business and know of a utility in a sunny desert climate whose entire fleet of rooftop solar never gets above 80% of capacity because of exposure and/or performance issues.  That includes midday in a snowless environment with shallow roof slopes where the sun gets to within about 10° of the zenith in June and even an east or west facing installation should be over 80% capacity at solar noon.  I also know people that definitely know better who maximize their way-too-high payment of around 7 cents per KW hour produced by installing electric baseboard heating to make sure they consume as much electricity as they produce.  They’re increasing demand on cold winter nights with intentionally inefficient electric heat when power is hard to come by to make sure they get paid for electricity they generate on sunny mid-days from April-August, some of which have high air conditioning demand (that peaks well after the peak in solar production) and some of which have little to none.

    Finally, as to carbon taxes, one constructed as described would be great.  As ao writes above, I don’t think that is very likely to happen.  Of the taxes implemented so far, were any designed to be 100% refunded on an equal basis and are any of them performing that way in reality?

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 8:54pm

    Reply to #37

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3233

    1+

    deleting programs & encouragement

    QB, ao-

    I remember weighing my food so I could count those calories.  That lasted about three months.

    Hmm.  I’ll do some stream of consciousness thinking here.

    Each of us are comprised of 50 trillion cells.  Together they probably have a collective clue as to whether or not a food you have eaten has had a positive or negative effect.  Your brain has stored that response somewhere.   Perhaps this is simply an already built-in mechanism for integrating the past clues, the memory, and being able to receive the summary of the information via a feeling.

    Bruce Lipton (Biology of Belief) has informed me on how the cells work, how DNA doesn’t control us (but rather it is our perceptions of the world that end up activating said DNA), and how our “initial programming” (from ages 0-6) of our subconscious is running 95% of the time, most of which is helpful (walking, talking, etc) but some of which can be quite self-destructive.

    As ao said, feelings seem to be our mechanism and pathway for summarizing a shitload of inputs and factoids and experience over a lifetime into a channel simple enough for our conscious mind to perceive.  “I just had a bad feeling about that guy.”  50 trillion cells plus some number of programs adding up a thousand tiny clues came up with that conclusion, and made it available in real time to our consciousness.  “A bad feeling.”

    As we know, training that subconscious (programming) is how martial arts work.  You don’t fight with your conscious mind.  It is way too slow.  Way, way too slow.  You fight with your programs, which were put in place during your training.

    Same thing is true for most of the things in life.  They are programs, put in place into your subconscious, most of them installed during childhood, and these programs are running 24/7.

    Most of those programs are useful.  Some are self-limiting or actively damaging.  Some of your programs have bugs, are based on wrong information, or maybe were fine for one time and place, but don’t (or maybe shouldn’t) apply for your entire life.

    So for me, my bad programs which resulted in bad eating behaviors (and a disconnection from that “this food isn’t great for me” body sense) were also running 24/7, which is why diets required so much constant willpower from me.  I was having to override my always-on programs with my conscious mind, which took a lot of energy.

    So, the recipe could be this: delete selected, troublesome programs, and encourage the channel flowing from your 50 trillion cell teammates, to your memory, to your consciousness via feeling, and maybe its just that easy?  🙂

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 10:02pm

    Reply to #40

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3233

    1+

    horsepower

    Perhaps you don’t know how abrasive and obnoxious your style of communication is but I for one can assure you that if you are trying to change hearts and minds and influence people you are going about it in the wrong way.

    Frankly, I don’t know why people even engage with you at this point you clearly don’t have the intellectual horsepower to address the substance of their critiques…

    Of course that is just a “feel- pinion”

    Yeah.  What he said.

    It did occur to me that he might just be employed by the Koch brothers in an attempt to use reverse psychology on us here.

    Try this on for size:

    By employing someone who executes a very convincing parody of the worst sort of intolerant and dogmatic science-as-religious-nutjob viewpoint, coupled with the most ineffective and abrasive presentation style possible, his alleged support of the climate cause ends up actively chasing all the agnostics here at the site towards opposition just out of self-defense.

    “Boy if this guy is for something, I want to make sure I’m on the other side, because he’s just that obnoxious.”

    Possible the Kochs are that clever?

    I’m really only half kidding here.  [EDIT]  Scratch that.  I’m not kidding.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Fri, Oct 18, 2019 - 10:23pm

    #41

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    Bloviation on overdrive

    folks like you were claiming we’d have an Ice Age in the 1980s.

    That gives the game away. “Folks like me”, you mean people trying to highlight the climate emergency. IOW, “nothing to see here people, Gerry is just another alarmist just like the Ice Age people in 1971.” THAT’S why I am less than courteous to you, AO. Because I correctly diagnosed the type of person you were right from the start. Creationism superior to evolution, Martin Armstrong (a felonious climate denier) supporter, carbon taxes will never work, etc. Pretty transparent agenda, and thread crapping every page with logorrheic posts so that your subtly pro-big oil/big coal opinions are heavily in evidence.

    Eating a sugar alcohol like erythritol is going to cause you problems

    Yet another baseless feel-pinion I’ll happily ignore, and no, I’m not diabetic.

    And its irrefutabley demonstrable that some of the great scientists and scientific discoveries and paradigm shifts were guided by intuition

    Never contested that. Not the same as giving primacy to intuition and disregarding science. Chalk and cheese. Antiscience posters are strong on intuition and disregarding facts.

    Perhaps you don’t know how abrasive and obnoxious your style of communication is …. Frankly, I don’t know why people even engage with you at this point you clearly don’t have the intellectual horsepower

    Beautiful example of hypocrisy. Thank you for the laugh.

    I would love it if you would address my first point about the evolutionary value of an animal having the ability to find and consume the appropriate mix and quantities of high quality foods through delicately tuned sensory feedback loops and internal assessment of body states

    Quercus, you style and grammar are so similar to AO’s that I refer back to my points on sockpuppets above. Plus the level of bloviation in your comments is appalling. It’s a wall-of-text technique to drive away posters with an agenda that does not jive with the one you’re setting up here, I get it. I wonder if Chris and his sidekick realise to what extent this site is compromised? I could be wrong about this …. but I’ve seen it before, even helped to stop it at some websites.

     

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2019 - 1:36am

    Reply to #41
    Sparky1

    Sparky1

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 21 2016

    Posts: 62

    3+

    Yet ANOTHER cheap shot from GerrySM

    GerrySM, you wrote, “I wonder if Chris and his sidekick realise to what extent this site is compromised?”

    WOW,  such hubris!  You’ve boasted on another thread that you “run” several websites (yeah, right…), so I would think that you would appreciate the significant time, effort, commitment and skill that goes into establishing and maintaining a fully functional site with sophisticated content and a vibrant on-line community.  Unless, of course, your sites simply serve as platforms for your own “bloviation on overdrive” (to an audience of one?).

    IMO, YOU are the only person compromising this site with your disrespectful, self-aggrandizing comments. Chris and Adam have displayed considerable strength of character and patience that allows for civil discussion and ardent debate among PP members with differing views. Personally, I don’t have the time or patience to wade through the insults embedded in your every comment to salvage the possible merits of your argument or point of view.  Enough already!  Best to ignore the troll.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2019 - 3:18am

    Reply to #41

    davefairtex

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 3233

    2+

    sidekicks

    Sparky-

    I saw that line too.  “sidekick!”  What does that look like to you?  To me it looks like a deval – the most obvious one certainly, but if you go back through the posts…I suspect you can spot others.  Of course Adam got the deval because he didn’t jump to ban people when Gerry whined at him about “hate speech” and “racism.”

    This is why I think Gerry can’t be real.  He either has to be an invention of the Koch brothers (he’s just too incompetent at persuasion to be performing his alleged duties) or he’s Crapper’s alter ego.  In fact – maybe they are the same person.

    Regardless, I think your advice is best: “ignore the troll.”  You have been suggesting this for a while now…time to listen, I think.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2019 - 9:29am

    #42
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 964

    2+

    my last post to the troll

    Gerry, if you could only realize how wrong you are on an abundance of issues.  When I was barely a teenager, I was researching magnetohydrodynamics and thermonuclear fusion as alternative power sources to fossil fuels, have witnessed first hand the putrid smell, the eye burning fumes, and the desolation of the landscape from New Jersey oil refineries.  So think what you will and take comfort in your false beliefs if that’s what you need to preserve your fragile ego.

    If you have the need to have sugar alcohols to your diet, something is wrong either physiologically or psychologically with your system.  No place in the nature you believe was fully formed by random Darwinian evolution are sugar alcohols found in purified form as foods.  Doesn’t happen.  On nutritional, health, and medical issues (at a minimum), I think you may be an unwitting victim of the Dunning-Kruger effect.  With the baked goods, erythritol, anger issues, mental (and probable physical) rigidity, etc., you may not have to worry about suffering through the effects of global warming.  You’re boosting the odds that you may not survive long enough to see that day.  Sad really.

    And you were really particularly rude to Quercus.  He did nothing but make very intelligent comments and ask very intelligent questions and you completely blew him off and insulted him to boot.  I do notice how you assiduously and frequently avoid answering the tough questions.

    So I will bid you a not so sad farewell.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2019 - 8:04pm

    #43

    GerrySM

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 20 2017

    Posts: 54

    Sugar alcohols

    If you have the need to have sugar alcohols to your diet, something is wrong either physiologically or psychologically with your system

    Ha! If you had done any research, you’d have found out that erythritol is the major constituent of the popular “Stevia” sweeteners on the market. So millions of people are eating it every day. Indeed, it’s “Amazon’s Choice”:

    https://www.amazon.com/Pyure-Organic-All-Purpose-Stevia-Sweetener/dp/B00NI2CTB0/

    It’s a naturally occurring sugar as well (molasses, wine, beer, sauces, etc), so not a frankenfood. I use it because I need to drink a lot of liquid to prevent kidney stones, to which I have a genetic proclivity. The sweetener makes the water/tea palatable.

    I eat baked goods, yes, as do billions of other people who have not bought into the keto/paleo bullsht.

    I have no anger issues. I’m a wealthy, happily married retired guy. I do get annoyed with liars and professional trolls who support antiscience stances in a time of climate emergency. You seem to be one of them, to me.

    So goodbye to you too, please refrain from replying to me again.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2019 - 8:27pm

    #44

    Adam Taggart

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 25 2009

    Posts: 2653

    6+

    OK - we're done here. The moderator takes action.

    Sorry for the slow action here, folks. I’ve been busy with partnership negotiations and now long days out in the Nevada desert with fellow PPers.

    I’ve just had the chance to go through the (many) comments generated by GerrySM and those engaging with him over the past few days.

    Gerry: you did not heed the clear warning I gave recently to abide by our site discussion guidelines. In fact, it seems you escalated your baiting, insults and antagonizing without contributing any value to the topics under discussion.

    You’ve been on moderator review before, so you should know by now what is acceptable here and what isn’t.

    So I have now removed your posting privileges. We’re going to give you a 2 week period to cool off and reflect, and will not allow any new posts from you during that time. Should you want to contribute respectful, constructive, well-argued comments after that, email them to us at [email protected] and we will review them. If they meet our posting guidelines, we’ll allow them.

    It has been several years since I’ve had to put someone on moderator review. I love how this community can successfully self-police itself 99 times out of 100. But you all have my commitment that in the few situations where that doesn’t happen, I will step in to preserve the rare and tremendously valuable exchange we all have created here for respectful idea exchange.

    cheers,
    Adam

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Oct 20, 2019 - 6:38am

    #45

    Quercus bicolor

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 230

    1+

    Thank you Adam

    This conversation really stank.  I did my best to offer real curiosity, good questions, agreement when I really did agree with him and my best ideas.  I was careful to completely refrain from anything that I thought could be construed as a personal attack.  What I got back was a few points of agreement (but little to no value added to the conversation with that agreement) and a bunch of personal attacks based on concocted stories like that last one that I was flooding the conversation with wordy responses as a trolling technique.  I got that feeling of unfairness and boundary violation that I don’t think I’ve experienced in 11 years on this site.

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Oct 20, 2019 - 1:19pm

    Reply to #45
    Sparky1

    Sparky1

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 21 2016

    Posts: 62

    1+

    Grace under fire

    Quercus, FWIW, I feel that you, Dave, AO, Mememonkey and several other PP members displayed enormous patience, restraint and goodwill in your responses to GerrySM–beyond even that which would be considered reasonable given his completely unwarranted personal attacks and unfounded assertions.

    Moving on, the PP community and site have weathered a rough patch and may be more resilient as a result.  But yeah, I appreciate the toll it took on you and others taking direct hits while maintaining the integrity of your positions and PP.  Your efforts did not go unnoticed or unappreciated.  🙂

    Login or Register to post comments

  • Sun, Oct 20, 2019 - 2:28pm

    Reply to #45

    Quercus bicolor

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 230

    Thanks

    Thank you Sparky.  Just another event in this crucible of life that can burn away all of the old patterns that aren’t really us and leave us stronger, more compassionate and wiser about which battles to fight and which to walk away from.  Yes, we will be more emotionally resilient from here forward.

    Login or Register to post comments

Login or Register to post comments