Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any thoughts on my situation?

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catastrophist's picture
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Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any thoughts on my situation?

I think my life is in danger.  I have known that at the level of the intellect for a couple of years, but only recently has it made me decide to change anything.  I live in NJ, where I am from and which I know well.  I'm asking for advice from those who are older and wiser, or from those in a position similar to mine, on how to proceed. 

I don't own any land.  My parents live in Montana, which I don't know at all, and they don't think collapse will happen.  They are retired and aren't prepping.  However, my dad is a lifelong hunter and master handyman--most unlike me.  (It's also extremely cold there--like -30 in winter--and snows as late as May!)

Where would you attempt to survive, if you were me?  In a rented house shared with three others here in NJ, where I'm getting a very good deal, or with parents out west?  Or someplace else?

I am 32 and a graduate of a top university, but I was a liberal arts major and went on to do very little in my 20's.  I have a part-time job teaching and tutoring with a test-prep company; I make about what a grad student does, i.e., enough to pay the bills and put very little away, but nothing to survive on long-term, and a far cry from what my high school classmates were expecting when they voted me "most likely to succeed."  I have a little more than 10K saved up.  No debt either--I was on a (merit) scholarship.  I'm non-materialistic and very frugal, and if everyone lived as I do, the system would have come down long ago. 

As much as I despise the business world, I was thinking about business school because it's frustrating not to have the cash to do much of anything besides work my job and read books and browse the internet in my spare time.  But then I determined that serious societal discontinuities would render the business world unable to function within the very near future.  So now I'm very afraid.  I haven't a clue.  A lot of companies look at GMAT scores; I teach that test, so when I take it this month I will do nicely and maybe I can get a real job without any more school.  But my worry is that maybe getting a job here is not worth getting caught in a population-dense area as everything comes down.

My parents' area in MT is the complete opposite.  They are 40-45 mins. away from any real town, where there is a Walmart where my dad would probably make me work.  I would probably have to work full-time there as a cashier to make what I do now working about 3 hours a day.  And I would have to drive about 50 minutes one-way to get there (and driving is something I absolutely abhor).  So my life would be very unpleasant if I moved there.  I would only go if I thought my survival depended on it.  I am now thinking that it does.  On the other hand they are doing nothing and it's quite cold there most of the year, unbearably so in the winter.

My parents would love to have me.  I can get them to come back to NJ to move me and all my stuff in a heartbeat.  I would have to tell my landlord by end of July to move out end of Aug.

Looking at my situation as a disinterested observer, what do you think?  Am I dead either way? 

 

 

 

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Frankly, I think you're dead either way.  In a survival situation, you have to work and work hard.  If you're 32 and (assuming you're able bodied) you need your parents to come all the way back to NJ to help you to move, something's wrong.  And if you're 32 and your dad would make you work in the WalMart, the fact that you think this way doesn't bode well for your survival in either situation.  I'd say continue on doing what you're doing and let the social safety net bail you out or seek out a federal government job.  Those are the survival strategies being used by a good chunk of the population that probably thinks like you.

OR

Get your rear in gear, change your attitude, and change your life rather than just coasting along aimlessly.  You need a passion and a purpose.     

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...
ao wrote:

Frankly, I think you're dead either way.  In a survival situation, you have to work and work hard.  If you're 32 and (assuming you're able bodied) you need your parents to come all the way back to NJ to help you to move, something's wrong.  And if you're 32 and your dad would make you work in the WalMart, the fact that you think this way doesn't bode well for your survival in either situation.  I'd say continue on doing what you're doing and let the social safety net bail you out or seek out a federal government job.  Those are the survival strategies being used by a good chunk of the population that probably thinks like you.

OR

Get your rear in gear, change your attitude, and change your life rather than just coasting along aimlessly.  You need a passion and a purpose.     

ao, amen to that!

 

catastrophist,

If you really, really believed that your life was in danger as you state in your opening, then why the reluctance to endure any difficulties.

You claim to be seeking guidance from those who are older and wiser, yet you won't go to Dad who is a master hunter and handyman, two extremely valuable skills in a survival scenario. Why? Because it's cold! Boo freakin' hoo! Tell that to Full Moon, a 79 years young Montana lady on these threads, or better yet to Plickety Cat up in Alaska!

Your subject line says you're trying to get serious about survival. Being serious involves prepping, which requires sacrifice, first of all a sacrifice of your time to study and learn the issues and how to prepare for what's a-comin'. Try reading the wealth of info that's already here instead of asking to be spoon fed a solution. If you did that you might have the insight to awaken your parents to the danger ahead and work cooperatively with them to save your sorry butt.

You ask if you're dead either way, whether you stay in NJ or go to MT. You will be dead not because of where you are but because of who you are. But, fortunately for you (and me, and everyone else) we have been given the gift of time, as Chris is fond of saying. So use that gift wisely to:

Get your rear in gear, change your attitude, and change your life rather than just coasting along aimlessly.  You need a passion and a purpose.     

 

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

 Yeah , ao ,  I agree  . 

 Cat,    Lots of luck   !  If  your buds are not prepping .... well you do  know they will be  a millstone around your neck .  Even if you prep for yourself  they will end up mooching .   

       I have a daughter living in the city....  she loves that kind of life . She knows she can come back this way  when ever she wants and   so I tell her to prep for emergency evac , have her bug out plan ready , keep the gas full at all times ,know the route home and people she can stay with in between .    She is  in tune with  what is going down  but   Until her heart changes and she wants to be  here at home  she is just  where she is supposed to be. However she does  send money home  for me to buy her prep things for here so that  when she does come she will not feel like a burden.  She knows survival skills and can pick up  her place here if the time comes .    If she does not want to be here and has no peace here ,   she will make  everyone miserable . That being said if  she  looses  her  job  she will  not spend  her money  down  so  far before packing up and heading home . 

 I will never tell  you to move home and mooch off your parents .  You could have a storage unit in the Montana town  filled with prepping things.  My guess is that your parents,  even though you say they are not prepping, are still  more ready than you are .

   Honest to pete ,      Teaching rich kids to pass a test ?!?!  What is up with that ?   I guess somebody will get paid to do it might as well be you....  but you made it sound like you were  just drifting through life .   

   Some of my older kids in their twenties get kind of down  at times because there seems to be little hope in the future  and the world we have messed up , But  I tell them it is their choice to change their little corner of the world and to get busy .

   Deep down you already know the answer  and if you do not keep searching ..     Making choices and mistakes is all apart of life...   sometimes you just have to step out on faith .    Get busy... times a wasting  !!

 FM .

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Deep down you already know the answer  and if you do not keep searching ..     Making choices and mistakes is all apart of life...   sometimes you just have to step out on faith .    Get busy... times a wasting  !!

Yup, time's a wastin'!  And in all reality, you know the answer to your own question.  IMO, if you're serious about surviving the coming collapse you would be saddled up next to your father learning every damn thing he can teach you!  If they have property, learn to farm and get moving!  If you have to work at Walmart, so be it!  But if in the first year you learned to farm on your spare time, by the second you could be living off of what you grown.  Also, as you're learning from your father, you could take the time to educate him on what's taking place in the world.  Sounds like you're from a fairly wealthy family that has decided to listen to the gov't and not to their instincts.  

Or as ao stated, you could move into the DC area, get a job with the gov't and make enough over the next year to bug out on your own.  I know jobs with the gov't right now that are paying $90k to first year people with ANY degree.

Either way, get off your ass and grow up!  If you're not willing to toughen up now, how do you think you'll survive?  Seriously. 


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Re: ...

First, I can't believe this has attracted so much attention.  Thanks for your comments.

Second, I definitely deserve all the flack I'm taking.  I've been idle too long.  On the other hand, every plan I'm able to generate requires money I do not have.  It's fair to say this thread was placed looking for a "spoon-fed solution," but I thought I might be missing something that someone else can see.  I clearly was!

Also, a bit of clarification - My family is not rich, quite the contrary actually.  They moved west because the taxes here were becoming prohibitively high.  And so my dad could hunt.  Because sitting in a tree and waiting for a deer to walk by is a lot of fun, I guess.

And yes, I teach rich high school students and various kinds of college students and adults to pass standardized tests.  Yes, most are spoiled brats, but you won't find an easier, more flexible part-time job, and I've learned a lot about human nature doing it.  Observing people as a teacher means you see the process by which they do things, and that reveals who they are.

I'll have to look into those 90K government jobs, but every one I've ever seen listed has many requirements and years of experience that I don't have.  Working for a year would change everything for me!

 

 

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

I admire your courage for speaking out on this website.   People need to feel safe enough to do so.  And the response you get are honest.

I am new at this and have similar mental adjustments to make.   

I just sold my sports car and have to buy another car.   I am looking for some insights from people to make the next purchase on what kind of car.

These are my 2 options that I am considering:

( I have 7 thousand to spend)   ( I can save $2000 per month to prepare )  

1.  buy a Toyota yaris for $7000  (purchase a large tank for gas storage)

2.  buy an older similar car for $3000 and save the $4000 for a down payment (plus a little more I save) on the Nissan Leaf for $27000(all electric car)  So I'd have a car payment to deal with.

Any other suggestions welcome.   ( I do want to continue purchasing Gold and Silver each month )

Thanks

Mike

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Mike,

IMHO, buy a Volvo Estate for around $1000. They are unburstable and very rarely break with maintainance a novice could do. They may not appear to have good gas mileage, but you'll never recoup depreciation on a younger more exotic alternative. You also lose no money, as you can always sell them for what you paid for them. A Toyota Prius, for example, loses over a third of its value within three years. The initial purchase cost and depreciation truthfully diminishes its apparent fuel saving. The money you save on buying a Volvo can be spent on prep. Parts are also dirt cheap.

Trust me, I'm not joking  ... Laughing...

In the UK, people are still throwing them away. If I can buy an equivalent here for under $700 with a good service history, low mileage etc, and put 17,500 miles on one in 9 months without turning a bolt, anyone can. I don't mean this as a stand alone example either, as I've travelled many a far-flung country by paying out peanuts for boxy Volvo's.

I know, it's a long long way from sports car ownership, but what I've written above is a huge secret. Old isn't unreliable. New is unreliable without mainenance. Marketing is why people buy new ...

~ VF ~ Classic car enthusiast of 30 years ...

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Mike,

If you're in the US, buy a good quality used Japanese economy car (Honda or Toyota or if you're in snow country, a Subaru).  If you find one with cosmetic damage that won't speed up rusting (such as hail damage), so much the better.  I bought a used higher mileage but very well maintained Honda Accord with hail damage for my daughter for $2,500 that just had key parts replaced.  It's been running flawlessly and gets mileage in the 30 mpg range.  Think high gas mileage, high reliability, low insurance costs, and don't worry about what it looks like.  You want to amass capital at this stage, not fritter money away on a depreciating asset.

Wait a few years on the electric car.  They are overpriced now, just as any new technology tends to be at its inception, and will have bugs to work out.  I'd look to get one 3-4 years down the line.

If you're in the UK, I'd have to defer to VF's recommendations.  Volvos are very, very safe and very reliable but in the U.S., they're very expensive to service and parts are expensive as well.  I guess it's different in the UK.

I'm a car nut personally and have enjoyed ownership of more pricey, high performance cars but I just sold off my last one a few months ago and I'm driving a very conservative and economical used car as are my other family members.  I'm sure neighbors, friends, and associates think we're experiencing an economic reversal but with what's coming down, we'd rather decrease insurance costs, premium fuel costs, maintenance costs, and depreciation loss and add to cash and PM reserves. 

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

 Cat ,

   Marry one of those rich girls   , move to a state that has  great laws , prepare, and then bail .   You know I am joking !!!     Just get a plan ,bud, and get going   . Yeah at least you did the math and know we are doomed and you only have yourself to take care of .      Drive down skid row  take a long look around  this could be where people end  .    It might help you make a choice  as to where you would rather end up  .    It would be no contest for me .  I would rather work at walmart in Montana  than live in a mansion in  Any City   just  how I feel safer .

 

  Mike ,  We just  made our car decision this week .  Sold the durn mini van that was useless .  Bought a suburban that had 50k miles on it for $5000,  and  best part  is we have another  one here at home with all the parts we could use to repair it .  It has 40 gallon tank and will go over 600 miles without refueling .    I feel safer anywhere we go if I know I can take the back roads  or ditches to get out of there  . It is big enough to carry a bug out  box , haul a horse trailer  and a load of people .    Biggest bonus is my husband  can work on it and has trained the boys to do the same and we have all the spare parts . 

 Later you can buy an electric car  when your prep is done  and you  are making your own electricity .(how far can you get on one charge ?)        This is our plan of action ,  but you did not give enough details as to how far you travel from your   safe place .  How secure your job is , how many you are responsible for , etc.

 

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Go to Montana. Get the 'rents to come help you move. Work at learning to survive in Montana. Learn to grow and hunt your own food. Learn to heat with wood, wear the right clothes.....

Your parents may not be "prepping", but they are 1000X more prepped than your roommates. The other people that live and thrive in Montana are tough good people already ready for a lot. Tougher than 99% of the rest of our Republic. You'll learn quickly to adapt and listen. You'll be a great student.

Stay on this site, make an occasional suggestion to your parents that might not seem like prepping, but is. 

Take the giant step of heading West young man and then take one baby step each day towards being responsible for your survival. Then add a second step each day helping your parents be ready. 

Your parents DO NOT have to be on board with your belief that collapse is imminent. They do not need to be barraged or convinced. They will easily assimilate common sense preps that make their life better today and tomorrow. Choose those preps to start with and keep your mouth shut about TEOTWAWKI.

Visit thesurvivalpodcast.com and browse through the archives.

Stop wasting time reading about TEOTWAWKI and read about living in Montana.

Keep us posted and welcome to the family.

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

I'm new to this site as well, and I am just as unprepared. Do the Self-Assessment under the Take Action tab at the top. It scared the heck outta me.

Realise that the future will be much harder than anything our generation was prepared for. Your mental grit will be what gets you through it.

 

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

vanityfox...

ain't an old car better-n 'de ole Mecrcedes 123 diesels or earlier,esp manual transmission. I've run 'em off sunflower oil when diesel was 4.00$

a gallon or more. Once caculated 16acres of sunflowers would provide my farm with all the oil neccessary for...

 

robie,husband,father,farmer,optometrist,a most reluctant and incapable typist(more ready than any i know)

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

This thread apears to be a Rorschach test, so I can't resist throwing in my $.02.

First of all, relax and breathe deeply.  It's very unlikely anything catastrophic (heh) is going to happen in the next few minutes.  You are not very different than the vast majority of people hooked into all sorts of little niches in a giant behemoth economy.  Most of those niches have very little to do with the sorts of long-term skills that will probably be needed over the next few decades.  But you can be sure that behemoth has a momentum and won't be collapsing overnight.  Don't expect to see change in your lifetime that you would describe as the end of the world.  You're not "doomed."  Well, we're all doomed, that's just life.

Believe it or not, every state in the US has universities and high schools where thousands of rich and upper middle class kids think the ticket to the good life is scoring well on some entrance exam.  Even Montana.  Certainly California and a lot of other places where you might have a good chance of meeting other people just as concerned with the future as you are.  It's making connections with like-minded people that will make the most difference.  Could even happen in NJ.

You definitely do not need money to take the first steps.  If you're even contemplating asking your poor parents to drop everything and come help move your sorry butt, you just have way too much stuff.  At 20, I shouldered a very small rucksack and a wool blanket and with about $20 in my wallet hiked to the interstate and stuck out my thumb.  Except for visits, I didn't return for 30 years, and I made a pretty good life for myself.  I know, times are different than the 70s, but people aren't, really.

This is not to say that being close to your parents might not be a good idea.  As they get older, they'll be needing you, too.  Have you tried thinking about them?

And there's no reason in the world to believe that rural people will do any better in the coming hard times than urban people.  Well, there at least as many arguments for the latter as for the former.  I happen to be living on a small farm near a small city, and practicing a lot of things people around here might consider survival skills.  But it's because I am very interested in helping to develop the kinds of long-term sustainable practices I think will be important to future generations, and I can afford to live a pretty good, if very simple, life doing it.  I just don't like the idea of getting back into one of those little niches in the behemoth with the life I have left.  If I thought it was about my near-term survival, I would probaly do things very differently.

Sorry if this comes off harsh.  Things probably aren't so dire right now, but if you wait too long, they could be.

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

I second what greenachers said.

Drive 100 miles a day to work a low paying job at walmart? Hmmmm, read that last sentence a few times...

Why dont you get another job or look for a full time job where you can make more money? Do little things to make yourself ready, if the world ends overnight we are all screwed, doesn't matter if you are in Montana or NJ.  My guess is that civilization will not end.  Prepare a little bit at a time, associate with people with a similar mindset. Take a deep breath.  I'm sure there are people in NJ that can teach you the same skills as your parents.  If things don't work out you can always move back to Montana as a backup plan.

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Catastrophist,

Its only digits, and digits can be recreated. So when the system unravels a new version will be born, this time with much more global integration and consolidation. Prepare for some type of SDR, gold, commodity, carbon credit type currency to be implemented when the USD reserve currency goes bust. Things could get ugly for a good 6-12 months. After that, some semblance of normalcy will return. The main issue here is ENERGY and peak oil. If PO effects are harsh and come sooner than things can get a bit out of control. On the other hand, if demand destruction continues, then we can possibly slug around for quite some time.

As you can tell, im not as pessimistic as some others are on this site. Montana is a safe but boring place to live. NJ, on the other hand, well it depends exactly where you live. Plenty of rainfall in the northeast. Try living in Phoenix or any other suburban sprawl in the southwest desert! Those places I can see quickly turning into little Detriots.

I dont think people will get as out of control as some expect. My family owns restaurants in some tough areas of Los Angeles. Crime has fallen dramatically since the early 90's and we are now near 40 year lows. Lots of the gangstas got locked up or killed, and the youngsters are figuring out that gangbanging is not a good way to live. LA was suffering over 1000 homicides per year in the early 90's, now we are down to the low 400's.

The 80's and 90's were tough years for this country. Homicide rates were sky high, crack cocaine epidemic was driving people mad. Despite the fact that the county is poorer now than it was in the 80's and 90's, we are definitely much safer.

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Catastrophist - I'm inclined to agree with Green-achers that immediate catastrophe is not likely to be immediate, (could happen of course) however things are going to change a lot over the next couple of decades and most of us will be much better of outside the system as much as possible.The idea of living in a highly populated area working for a paycheck does not sit well with me. You mention "my dad is a lifelong hunter and master handyman" -- seems to me that you may have a lot to learn from him that will stand you in good stead for the rest of your life. Family can be the best backstop possible in difficult times, so a good option is Montana. How about helping Mom & Dad do some preparing and at the same time prepare yourself for the future. 

Driving 1 1/2 hours a day to a low paying job is not a good option except as a short term bridge to something else. Better to sign on with a local rancher or farmer and learn the ways of living off the land - not an easy life, but it can be sustainable and the skills learned from there will enable you to live and provide for your family. An objective could be to get some acreage (make sure it has water) and a grazing lease on some land - at least I'd want to look into that  carefully.

Jim

PS -- Make sure you have long johns and some good down & fleece clothing for the winter

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Again, thanks for all the comments.  

Just one thing, someone said I'm just drifting through life and have no passion.  Not true.  My passion is academics, and I was researching grad programs at the time I discovered collapse issues.  So I concluded universities would not be functioning much longer, and an advanced degree in the humanities would be impossible to complete.  But without any real cash, I didn't know what else to do.  So I've been in a holding pattern for a few years.

I am one who loves learning for its own sake, in the spirit of this article by Carolyn Baker: http://209.169.7.10/content/view/1700/1.  So I have no problem studying without a view to a huge payday.  But that way of thinking got me in trouble because I didn't exactly anticipate the end of the world as we know it, and having extra cash would be nice right now.

I am leaning toward moving, but I'm going to attempt to find those high-paying government jobs someone mentioned.  Even working one year would change everything for me.  And I am a good, hard worker too.  I think I would bring a lot of value.  But I'm usually turned away because my degree isn't career-oriented.  Sigh...

 

 

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

 Hey Cat ,    I too think many  University 's are going to go through a struggle  but  the rich will still find a way to get their kids into them  even if they hire someone to take the test .   With your passion for learning and helping  I would think counselor might  be something to consider ....   can you imagine the struggles people are going to go into when they can not depend on their degree to save them and have been caught unaware ?

  Just a thought ,  I know you are on the right path just by asking the question .  At times I think any job is a good thing .

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...
LogansRun wrote:

Or as ao stated, you could move into the DC area, get a job with the gov't and make enough over the next year to bug out on your own.  I know jobs with the gov't right now that are paying $90k to first year people with ANY degree.

 

Could you be a little more specific about this? Not saying those jobs don't exist, I would just love to know where they are. I applied to a bunch of legal internships with the federal government this summer and got rejected from all of them, but at this point I would be willing to do any non-legal work for $90k/yr.

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Move to Missoula.

Look for work in your field.  If none, get a job at the local Co-op, Starbucks or whatever.

Get your own place.  Really, you're an adult.  But at least you'll be in the same region as Mom and Dad so you can help if they need anything and you can share time with Dad during deer season.

Work your way into a university job and start hanging out with the environmental, sustainable ag types you'll find on any campus.  They're the most likely to be PO aware.

Eventually, you can think about moving closer to Mom and Dad.

There.  With 20/20 vision of an outsider, I solved your life for you.

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Oh, yeah, one more thing.  You can stop thinking of yourself as a "young man."  I was married and had a daughter at your age, and I'm the original Peter Pan... OK, maybe not the original... but it took me a long time to settle down.

My son has someone your age in his squad he calls the "broken old man."

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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...
ao wrote:

Mike,

If you're in the US, buy a good quality used Japanese economy car (Honda or Toyota or if you're in snow country, a Subaru).  If you find one with cosmetic damage that won't speed up rusting (such as hail damage), so much the better.  I bought a used higher mileage but very well maintained Honda Accord with hail damage for my daughter for $2,500 that just had key parts replaced.  It's been running flawlessly and gets mileage in the 30 mpg range.  Think high gas mileage, high reliability, low insurance costs, and don't worry about what it looks like.  You want to amass capital at this stage, not fritter money away on a depreciating asset.

Wait a few years on the electric car.  They are overpriced now, just as any new technology tends to be at its inception, and will have bugs to work out.  I'd look to get one 3-4 years down the line.

If you're in the UK, I'd have to defer to VF's recommendations.  Volvos are very, very safe and very reliable but in the U.S., they're very expensive to service and parts are expensive as well.  I guess it's different in the UK.

I'm a car nut personally and have enjoyed ownership of more pricey, high performance cars but I just sold off my last one a few months ago and I'm driving a very conservative and economical used car as are my other family members.  I'm sure neighbors, friends, and associates think we're experiencing an economic reversal but with what's coming down, we'd rather decrease insurance costs, premium fuel costs, maintenance costs, and depreciation loss and add to cash and PM reserves. 

Excellent comment ao,I have a personal friend in the UK who's father in Chicago has just such a car as you describe.

 As for me, my daily driver was built in 1955, keeps up with modern traffic and ticks all my boxes. He's called Titus :-

Austin A30 Seven

 

~ VF ~

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Vanityfox451
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
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Posts: 1636
Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...
robie robinson wrote:

vanityfox...

ain't an old car better-n 'de ole Mecrcedes 123 diesels or earlier,esp manual transmission. I've run 'em off sunflower oil when diesel was 4.00$

a gallon or more. Once caculated 16acres of sunflowers would provide my farm with all the oil neccessary for...

 

robie,husband,father,farmer,optometrist,a most reluctant and incapable typist(more ready than any i know)

My Dad drove a 1963 Mercedes back in the mid 70's. Hewn out of granite is the best way to describe it. I had a friend In Greece years ago who shoehorned an Isuzu diesel in one that from memory returned about 40 miles to the gallon. He saved it from oblivion with a handful of pocket change Drachma and coveted it like a lover. I fail to have any passion for anything worth more than 30 cents and doesn't need a wrench twirled on it!!

Mercedes W111

~ VF ~

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SagerXX
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Posts: 2252
Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...
mike009 wrote:

These are my 2 options that I am considering:

( I have 7 thousand to spend)   ( I can save $2000 per month to prepare )  

1.  buy a Toyota yaris for $7000  (purchase a large tank for gas storage)

My wife & I bought a Yaris two+ years ago (I remember thinking "whoa.  this could be the last car I ever buy [with the possibility of SHTF looming]...").

For the money, it's a great car.  We've put 75k miles on it commuting (yes I well aware that's not a sustainable lifestyle, if you check my other posts esp on the "Community Building" thread you'll see how hard I'm working on *that* end of things) in the 28 months we've had it.  It runs really well, and has pretty good pickup for an engine that gets 42-43 mpg (in the Summer -- Winter mileage is more like 38-39 -- it's a manual transmission).  Quality car considering how little it costs.

Just my $0.02...

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LogansRun
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Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

Go here:  http://www.dhs.gov/xabout/careers/content_multi_image_0014.shtm

Here:  http://careers.state.gov/hiring.html

Here:  http://www.nrahq.org/careers/jobs.asp

And here for most US Gov't jobs:  http://www.usajobs.gov/firsttimevisitors.asp

Now, getting these jobs isn't exactly easy as they have many people applying at this time.  But if you know how to network with the "gatekeepers", you can get a foot in the door very easily.  And "yes" there are jobs out there at anywhere from $40k to $120k for people with degrees.  It obviously takes the proper person to get these jobs, but if you show an aptitude or score high on their tests you'll get in without a problem.  

This may help you prepare:  http://federaljobs.net/exams.htm

Be prepared though that if you score well on a specific test, you may be whisked away into a career you'll regret later in life.  I know this first handEmbarassed

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soulsurfersteph
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Posts: 204
Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...
green_achers wrote:

Oh, yeah, one more thing.  You can stop thinking of yourself as a "young man."  I was married and had a daughter at your age, and I'm the original Peter Pan... OK, maybe not the original... but it took me a long time to settle down.

My son has someone your age in his squad he calls the "broken old man."

No, I don't think that's true or helpful. I'm 40 and not married yet, but not at all atypical for a Generation Xer living in an urban area. Times have changed...32 IS still young. *I* still think I'm young and people often think I am much younger than my age. It's because I didn't marry at 20 and wear myself out with 2 kids by the time I was 25. And I keep myself in great shape. And the good news is, at 32 and single you're young enough that if you truly need to "get the hell out of dodge" quickly, you are still able-bodied enough to do so (assuming you are not totally out of shape). So the good news IS that you are still "young" and not tied down AND can pick up at the drop of a hat if need be.

None of us knows the future. We all take risks in life. I spent a good number of years here in LA after experiencing a devastating earthquake and I know another one could hit at any moment. You could get hit by a bus tomorrow. Life is unpredictable. NJ could be safe or turn into a major hell-hole. None of us knows for sure.

So...if you don't to live in Montana right now, don't go there! Have it as a back-up plan. I personally don't think things will collapse overnight (I could be wrong) so I don't think you'll die if you stay in NJ. If things get unpleasant, then have a way out. Get your map and route to Montana set up and be ready to go if things are getting bad.

Hell, while I am planning on moving out of LA soon, if things got really bad I'm totally OK with taking a bike and freakin' pedaling myself back to my parent's home in Maryland if I really have to. I'm IN SHAPE and can handle that. 

So #1 - get in shape!

#2 - What you do need is to figure out a career path that makes you happy and hedge your bets against the worst case scenario. Look at third world countries today - what kinds of jobs do they have? My presumption is we'll be more like the third world at worst than Mad Max. Do they still have businesses in the third world countries? Teachers? 

None of us knows what will happen next. If you find a particular career path interesting, I say go for it, while hedging your bets and also building up other useful skills for if things really do get bad. Go get a higher paying job AND learn to garden, be a carpenter, etc etc. You have plenty of time now....you don't have family or other responsibilities so that's a positive. Take your free time and get involved in a local transition group and learn some useful skills. Be ready to shift gears when necessary. I think the best trait to have right now is simply the ability to adapt quickly. 

Since no-one knows what exactly will happen, being adaptable is the best quality you can have. No amount of stockpile will make up for that. You could stockpile everything and still lose it due to fire, quake, flood, burglars or rodents. Being adaptable is something no-one can take from you, however.

PS I used to do SAT tutoring. There is nothing shameful about it. I did teach rich kids but also went to poorer schools and helped entire classrooms of disadvantaged students pass those tests. 

 

 

 

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V2
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Joined: May 13 2010
Posts: 31
Re: Young man trying to get serious about survival - Any ...

catastophist,

I'm actually in a very similar situation. Young (mid 20's), living in NJ, parents soon retiring to a remote cabin in GA, no debt, some cash saved up. I became aware of the great contraction a couple years ago through blog sites, and I discovered this place a few months ago. The information can be overwhelming and make you feel panicked. My first realization was that I simply need to calm down. Take a deep breath, and realize you have time to prepare. Right now, I'm simply perusing the forums here and gathering information. From there, I'm setting up a budget. I have limited cash to spend, and it's going to take some work to allocate my resources properly.

In the meantime my "step zero" has been acquiring a firearm for self defense, stocking up on canned food/bottled water, and moving some of my money out of the bank in case of a withdrawal freeze.

I also am hoping to discover a community of survivalists in NJ - hey, maybe you and I could start something? PM if you're interested in talking more about that.

-V2

 

 

 

 

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