Worth its weight in salt

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BungeeBones's picture
BungeeBones
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Worth its weight in salt

One of the problems facing the typical working family in this economic "unwinding" is the constant increases of prices putting extreme pressure on any savings they manage to put into gold or silver. I'm thinking we (average, middle income poor people etc) need to put some savings away for possible "catastrophic". While gold and silver will eventually return as the currency of commerce there will be an interstitial period where commerce (and life as we know it) will cease. It will cost a fortune in gold or silver to maintain your old life style and the temptation to cash the metals in will be extraordinary. A principle of insurance is that the cheapest insurance is usually the type that handles the rarer catastrophic loss. That worst case scenario is why I am talking about salt  (it came up today in a discussion with a local farmer).

Sure, he has cows but if it gets real bad will there be electricity and refrigeration? If not, who will want to eat a cow at one sitting? Salt is the way he could preserve the meat and convert it to smaller components more adaptable to barter and small transactions. The same would be true of fish. Without salt, you need to fish every day. With it you can preserve your catch for later consumption or trade.

Salt now is very cheap. If one invests in it it won't spoil. It is not salable, however, so you won't be able to do much with it beyond saving it for worst case. But if that worst case happens the salt would likely be worth more than its weight in gold.

 

Saffron's picture
Saffron
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

that is very interesting ... are there other things that might be worth picking up and storing for a possible worst case scenario?

BungeeBones's picture
BungeeBones
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

Hmmm, I'm just starting to give it some thought really. Since you ask another one does come to mind - spare parts, new and used. Worse case scenario means all trade with other countries stops. If the water pumps on the Toyotas die there will be fewer and fewer replacements available. I have an old laptop but I can get a bunch of them real cheap from refurbishers. If necessary I could cannabalize them and be able to keep at least one going. I guess the principle is to buy what is perceived as little or no value today but would have extreme value in the worst case. Obviously, I place a high value on my laptop (right up there with food Wink)

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
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Re: Worth its weight in salt
Saffron wrote:

that is very interesting ... are there other things that might be worth picking up and storing for a possible worst case scenario?

Saffron -

Poke around here and I'm sure you will find some useful information.

http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/consolidated-list-links-existing-preparation-threads/27912

Some items for youto consider:

Long term food storage

Freeze dried food storage

MREs

Portable shelter (tents, sleeping bags, etc.)

Water filtration/purification

Lots more at the above link.  Happy hunting.

BungeeBones's picture
BungeeBones
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

While that is a great list, dogs, and definitely a great resource, the cost of acquiring those items would be huge. The "target market" for my suggestion was those on a tight budget. My own experience (being one of those) is that purchases of silver and gold almost inevitably result in a later sale of them when "money" gets tight (such is the case of many). Though the cause may be the lack of willpower to save, the reality of the event is still there for many people and the cycle of buying and selling can also be the result of market manipulations.  None of those things occur in the "salt" market. It is as indestructable as gold (just be sure to keep it dry), as valuable in a crisis, has low carrying costs and little initial investment.

 

Tycer's picture
Tycer
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

Sugar never spoils. 

It has many uses from sweetening things to wound care to making alcohol.

Dogs_In_A_Pile's picture
Dogs_In_A_Pile
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Re: Worth its weight in salt
BungeeBones wrote:

While that is a great list, dogs, and definitely a great resource, the cost of acquiring those items would be huge. The "target market" for my suggestion was those on a tight budget.  

Bungee -

I hear you, but can you afford to not do as much as you can afford to do?

(I do believe Mrs. Wamsley, my 4th grade English teacher, just rolled in her grave over that sentence.)

Nacci's picture
Nacci
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

Ammo is worth its weight in salt.

M.E.'s picture
M.E.
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

Great topic - glad you posted it!  I agree that salt is a very important thing to stock up on.  

There is a great DVD called "Pig In A Day" from River Cottage (http://www.rivercottage.net/ShopProduct68/PiginaDayDVD.aspx) for approx $30 that teaches you how to make prosciutto, sausage, salami and other stuff and none of it needs refrigeration.  It's very entertaining as well.  They really use everything but the oink as the saying goes.  I have yet to be proficient in making any other pork products but hope to soon.  For now, we have two 8-10 lb prosciuttos (ridiculously easy to make) hanging in the kitchen from last year's pigs and 50 lbs of salt in the basement waiting for us to find the time to make some of the other stuff on the video.  Maybe we should really have 100 lbs on hand - I have no idea.  I haven't found anything on preserving beef in a similar manner yet.

I hear you on the target audience.  This stuff really adds up and there are many facets to survival - food and water and shelter and . . .  Why can't I just be a worm?!  My MO is to pick one thing from Dr. M's list and do it, learn it, apply it and then move on to the next thing.  Each thing takes months to save up for and execute, let alone understand well so perseverance is another thing I need to stock up on. Smile

yoshhash's picture
yoshhash
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

way to think outside the box!  I love it, it's definitely on my list now.

Not as original, but I've been saying for some time that water re-use and harvesting skills (and products) will be infinitely valuable soon enough.

Cloudfire's picture
Cloudfire
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Don't put all your salt in one basket . . .

No matter what happens, increasing your capacity to produce high-quality organic food and herbs will give you a good return, whether it's in your own health, cash, or barter.  Invest in your soil and nonhybrid seeds.  Put up more than you think you'll need in nonperishables:  salt, sugar, grains, beans, etc, etc . . .

I also like to put up more than I'll need of certain compounds, such as calcium hypochlorite, which can be used to . . . . more . . . . (Putting By a Bit of Extra, for Barter or for Charity, October 7, 2009 Post)

fredbrent's picture
fredbrent
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

I grew up outside of Jacksonville Oregon.  Years ago there was a gold rush in that  area.  Due to a severe snow storm one winter, the supply routes were closed for an extended period of time.  During this time it is recorded that salt did actually trade pound for pound for gold dust.

BungeeBones's picture
BungeeBones
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Re: Worth its weight in salt

LOL, here in Florida, after a hurrican, they would call that "price gouging" and drag the hapless selleroff to jail. I bet they were glad to get the salt at that price.

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