When Farming Goes Corporate

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When Farming Goes Corporate

From water to food, corporations want control of it all. The U.S. government is being reduced to servants of BIG business with America as the hub of the corporate universe. Our government exists at their behest, and we are merely the cattle.

When Farming Goes Corporate

by Sara Novak, Columbia, SC on 09.19.09

At TreeHugger, genetically modified organisms (GMO) have long provided reason for concern. Large monocultures, which are typical of GMO, can be riddled with pests. As a result, monocultures are often dressed with a toxic cocktail of pesticides so that they can survive the onslaught. In addition, monocultures can deplete the nutrients in soil and lead to erosion. But the problems with GMO go way beyond freakishly round, tasteless tomatoes. According to New York Times columnist Verlyn Klinkenborg, GMO "represent the final transfer of the collective farming wisdom of the human race into corporate hands."

In a recent article in Yale Environment 360‏, columnist Verlyn Klinkenborg explains what happens when you eliminate the role of the farmer in farming and farming goes corporate.

"Genetically modified crops are rigorously licensed forms of intellectual property. Every seed is a binding contract with stiff penalties attached," says Klinkenborg.

Farmers are essentially giving up the wheel to corporate entities that research, develop, and mass produce seeds. Tracts of land planted with commercial seeds are pushing out local crop varieties and erasing the knowledge gained from 10,000 years of farming......

 

 

 

Human beings on this planet may not have a choice about the dominant form of agriculture that feeds us. 6 billion people are difficult to feed with anything other than industrial style, monoculture agricultural processes.

But one of the weaknesses of planting acres of the same plant is that a single pathogen can wipe out large fields of crops in a very short time. The weakness of spraying with chemicals to suppress pathogens is too obvious to discuss. The natural and low cost solution is multiple crop plantings, but you don’t see much of that from industrial agriculture.

We face several threats to the world’s food supply. One is a push to turn a food supply into a fuel supply in the form of biofuels, another is the possibility of monoculture crop failure from new resistant forms of crop pathogens. This report from Kenya covers a resurgence of an old threat to wheat crops: stem rust.  For more information on stem rust, try this site.

There is strength in diversity. This is a biological truth.

Small Blue Planet » Blog Archive » Monoculture Agriculture Creates ...

 

At the turn of the century there were 7,000 varieties of apples grown in the US . There are now less than 1,000.
There used to be 30,000 varieties of rice grown in India. Today more than 75% of the rice comes from just 10 varieties.
This holds true for language and culture as well. Half of the languages spoken in the world have been extinguished, and we are rapidly extinguishing the ones that remain.

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

FYI -

Interesting video on:

http://www.ted.com/talks/stewart_brand_proclaims_4_environmental_heresie...

Worth the watch one point in the video is amazing (wait until after the train). However, I cannot believe his views on GMO!! Correct me if I'm wrong but you sign a contract when you receive any of these GMO seeds that exclude publication of any research, including comparison with any other seed. An end user license agreement similar to software that says if it don't work - well, . . ..  erm, . . . . . tough!

In touch with local MP here in the UK but just been 'fobbed off' (research has given the all clear to GM). Financial crisis OK people get burned but things can continue. Environmental crisis and bingo Homo SaPlayPen is no longer gonna get out of this mess. Still our generation has achieved some notable goals - erm, . . . . started democracy in Iraq, Afghanistan, . . . . . erm, . . . .  set the stage to erradicate poverty and hunger, . . . . ,  erm, . . . .  come on guys help me out my memory is failing me, . . . . .  dear oh dear what a mess!

 

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

 

I cannot believe his views on GMO!! Correct me if I'm wrong but you sign a contract when you receive any of these GMO seeds that exclude publication of any research, including comparison with any other seed. An end user license agreement similar to software that says if it don't work - well, . . ..  erm, . . . . . tough!

He must be a shill of Monsanto. The problems of GMO are numerous. Here's a recent study which says they are a dud:

UCS Study Says Genetically Modified Crops Have Failure to Yield

Saturday, September 19, 2009 by: Aaron Turpen, citizen journalist (NaturalNews)A 43-page study released by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS) reveals that since the inception of genetically modified (GM or GMO) crops, no significant increases in crop yields can be attributed to them. This is directly contrary to what Monsanto and other seed-makers have often pointed out in their own research and the UCS study answers why that is. The study, titled Failure to Yield, is available online, free of charge1.........

And his encouragement of populations to migrate to cities is odd as well. The best definition of a city is how Derrick Jensen described it: “people living more or less permanently in one place in densities high enough to require the routine importation of food and other necessities of life.” So by definition, cities are inherently unsustainable. Smaller towns are more sustainable, provided they have adequate water and fertile land. He doesn't even touch the elephant in the room - Overpopulation.

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

It's all very scary:

http://www.foodincmovie.com/

 

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

When? Its been this way for decades, I could post a dozen films and books on the subject if you are curious.

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

Ed Archer said:

When? Its been this way for decades, I could post a dozen films and books on the subject if you are curious.

 

 

 

 
So, we, you know, we looked at this question, we looked at this question right after 9/11 and there was all this talk about the threat of bioterrorism and the vulnerability of the American food system, and Tommy Thompson when he was leaving Health and Human Services as Secretary, he said, you know, “The biggest surprise in all my years in government since 9/11 is that they haven't attacked our food system because it would be so easy to do.” And, in fact, the GAO studied this question and they said, “Yes, a highly centralized food system is exquisitely vulnerable to both deliberate and accidental contamination.” Did we move toward decentralizing, however? No. We didn’t take a single step in that direction and the subject was quietly dropped, because it was an enormous threat to very powerful interests in this country. So, there are many, many reasons to decentralize the food system. ....
----Michael pollan, Georgia Organics conference in Douglas, GA on March 9,2009
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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

The following video best explains the insanity of our modern industrial food complex and what we need to do to alter it.

may 2009

Michael Pollan: Deep Agriculture The Long Now Foundation Video

 

 

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When Corporations are Scapegoats . . . .
xraymike79 wrote:
 
So, we, you know, we looked at this question, we looked at this question right after 9/11 and there was all this talk about the threat of bioterrorism and the vulnerability of the American food system, and Tommy Thompson when he was leaving Health and Human Services as Secretary, he said, you know, “The biggest surprise in all my years in government since 9/11 is that they haven't attacked our food system because it would be so easy to do.” And, in fact, the GAO studied this question and they said, “Yes, a highly centralized food system is exquisitely vulnerable to both deliberate and accidental contamination.” Did we move toward decentralizing, however? No. We didn’t take a single step in that direction and the subject was quietly dropped, because it was an enormous threat to very powerful interests in this country. So, there are many, many reasons to decentralize the food system. ....
----Michael pollan, Georgia Organics conference in Douglas, GA on March 9,2009

But, if you're interested in controlling a population through food, or controlling a population's lifespan through food, centralization is a huge advantage . . . . .  I can't help but notice how responsibility for some actions is deflected to the "powerful [insert industry] lobby" . . . . But the desires of some other industries, how ever large and powerful, are brushed aside without any apparent severe ramifications for elected officials.  I'm beginning to suspect that the "powerful [insert industry] lobby" is a cover story for the dirty deeds of TPTB's plans for globalization, population control, and whatever else is on the agenda du jour.

 

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

Yup, greed and the desire for greater efficiency has rendered the world very vulnerable.I still think thats the underlying cause rather than an organized effort of some kind but I really don't want this to turn into that kinda thread.

Since its so efficient, a small disruption in the chain will lead to massive upheavals imo. Corn esp since a stunning amount of whats in our supermarkets and has been processed to get there comes from a few varieties of it.

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate
Ed Archer wrote:

Yup, greed and the desire for greater efficiency has rendered the world very vulnerable.I still think thats the underlying cause rather than an organized effort of some kind but I really don't want this to turn into that kinda thread.

Since its so efficient, a small disruption in the chain will lead to massive upheavals imo. Corn esp since a stunning amount of whats in our supermarkets and has been processed to get there comes from a few varieties of it.

It's Okay, Ed . . . . Just put on this tin hat, and you won't get any conspiracy contamination on you . . . . Sealedmmmph!  mmmpht!  mmmowpht!  Smile

See full size image

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

Hey, YOU are the one who has to wear that hat to protect you from the mind control waves that the aliens controlling the NWO from the other side of the moon. ;)

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xraymike79
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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

There is no secret cabal. It's very simple. Corporations rule the planet. Government's exist to serve them. Everything and everyone is just looked at as an object to be mined for profit.

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate
Ed Archer wrote:

Hey, YOU are the one who has to wear that hat to protect you from the mind control waves that the aliens controlling the NWO from the other side of the moon. ;)

I never leave home without it, friend . . . . Smile

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate

Economist's advice to Big Food: Change or face fate of GM

Renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs warned the food industry that it risks disaster if it doesn't get behind changes that will deal with climate change, environmental degradation and global hunger.

Sachs, author of the "The End of Poverty" and a special adviser to the United Nations, said the food industry has lost the public's confidence in its ability to deliver healthful foods in an environmentally sustainable manner.

"This industry is a powerful lobby," but it could "lobby its way to GM's success," he said, referring to General Motors.

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Re: When Farming Goes Corporate
xraymike79 wrote:

Economist's advice to Big Food: Change or face fate of GM

Renowned economist Jeffrey Sachs warned the food industry that it risks disaster if it doesn't get behind changes that will deal with climate change, environmental degradation and global hunger.

Sachs, author of the "The End of Poverty" and a special adviser to the United Nations, said the food industry has lost the public's confidence in its ability to deliver healthful foods in an environmentally sustainable manner.

"This industry is a powerful lobby," but it could "lobby its way to GM's success," he said, referring to General Motors.

Well, nothing like a public threat to make persuasive speech more effective . . .

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