What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

45 posts / 0 new
Last post
SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 10 2008
Posts: 1499
What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

The other day I signed up with a "Survivalist" group here in the Portland, OR metro area. It's actually not a "survivalist" group per se but more along the lines of a group of people preparing for the uncertain future.

The topic for their next meeting is a good one: What's in your bug-out bag?

This got me thinking and re-evaluating my planning. It's one thing to prepare for the uncertain stuff coming down the road. However, how prepared are you for an immediate emergency? If you woke up and your house was on fire or an earthquake hit or a tornado struck pretty much decimating your house, do you have a single bag that contains all the really important things you want to save (outside of family and pets, of course)?

I realized that I was not prepared for such an event. There were important documents, family pictures, historical paper items, gold and silver items, other irreplaceable items, etc. scattered in various places around the house - in my filing cabinet, in drawers, etc. I quickly realized that I'd be in deep trouble if I had to bail out of the house in 30-seconds or less.

I now have a "bug-out bag". In it, I have placed the various items mentioned above. Now, all I have to do is grab it and run.

What about you - are you ready?

scotthw's picture
scotthw
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 16 2008
Posts: 59
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

I started a bug out kit right after 9/11 and have been tweaking ever since.  Every time I read something new, I go over my "inventory" sometimes making changes. I actually have two bins, one 2 X 2 X 2, the other 2 X 2 X 3.5'.  The smaller is the MOST important, the larger "nice to have".  There is enough food for 3 days, miscellaneous water treatment stuff, stove, cook kit, blankets, change of clothes, small tools, first aid, radio that is handcrank/batteries, spare batteries, 2 LED flashlights, compass, walkie talkies, knife, hatchet. sharpening stone, cash, and lots of etc.  Grabbing a couple 5 gallons jugs of water on the way out and the wife and I are good for short emergencies, or to get us to SOME destination.  If I have time then I grab the larger bin, tent, more water.  I decided this is just common sense anyway for natural emergencies, so no one would call me a fruit cake, secretly knowing it is also for man made emergencies/sieges/anarchy.  After reading Cory Lundin's works I am also prepared <I think  Undecided> to "staycation" after "All Hell Breaks Loose".

 

 

songbird's picture
songbird
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 16 2008
Posts: 23
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

ScottHW referred to Cody Lundin in his post, and I have recently finished his book, When  All Hell Breaks Loose - Stuff You Need to Survive When Disaster Strikes.  I found it to be very helpful, and am feeling a lot less anxious about what to do when TSHTF.  While the book focuses more on surviving a short term emergency, such as a natural disaster, a lot of the ideas could be used long term.  You could certainly at least keep things going for a few weeks, and that would give you time to consider your more long term options without panicking.  At the very least these are good ideas for anyone who faces the possibility of earthquakes, tornados, blizzards etc.

It is critical to make long term plans, but for anyone feeling overwhelmed as to how to begin, this book can give you a good start.   

beavercreekmom's picture
beavercreekmom
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 3 2009
Posts: 3
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

My BOB is in the van, the childrens' are hung on a hook in their room, next to the hook with their sleeping bags, so it would be a quick grab, not searching closets, under the bed, etc.

In them:  Bible, small pad of paper and pen, playing cards, envelope with copies of birth certificates, passports, etc. and a sheet of phone numbers (the childrens' are laminated.)  Ponchos, emergency blankets, soap, washcloth, lightweight food for 3 days, hand sanitizer, small fishing kit, multitool, emergency candle, waterproof matches, flashlight, socks, hat and gloves.   Mine also has shampoo, toothbrushes, toilet paper, binoculars and a book on wild edibles.  We carry a Katadyn hiker in the van.  Need to add cash in small bills.  and coins. 

If there were more time, we also have a tote with much more food, a cooking pot and a note reminding us to grab the Berkey, etc.

You also might want to check out Mrs. Survival for a lot of good ideas on prepping.  Gentlemen are welcome, too.

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Sam,

Great subject! I'll do a more "in depth" writeup later (See - Pictures and explainations) but a quick suggestion right off the cuff is heavy duty trash bags.

I know it sounds really goofy, but they're good for so many different things it's not funny.
Gathering and holding water, improvised poncho, collecting mushrooms or fish - the uses are limited by your imagination.

I also didn't see 550 cord (Paracord) which amazing stuff. Can be used for fishing, load bearing, securing, shelter building, rope making, making rafts... all sorts of great stuff.

I'll take some pictures and do a proper examination of the gear that has and hasn't worked for me in the past... as well as how I carry it.

Cheers!

Aaron

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Cory Lundin is obsessed with those plastic bags being orange. Not sure I've even seen an orange plastic bag.

I've thought about GOD bags (get-out-of-Dodge) and bug-out bags but it is almost impossible to quickly leave where I am, 15 miles down an island accessible only by several huge bridges. In the summer the bridges are backed up for 5 hours on good days with tourists, probably for days in a disaster. I don't own a boat and the two man raft I have would be suicide in a hurricane. Radiation, tsunami, riots, earthquake, you-name it, I'm hanging in unless there's several days notice. I'm aiming for sufficient stored items to survive it all.

And, hopefully, a community.

 

SG

P.S. It's a good idea, though. My friend lost her house and everything she owned in the Oakland fire a decade ago. They were given 30 seconds to collect their stuff.

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

OK,

I apologize for the delay, had social obligations that precluded me from doing anything useful the last couple days.

In order to achieve a wholistic approach to gear, you must think of it like clothing.
When we go out for the day, we assess the conditions, the likelihood that you'll encounter rain, or hot weather, what work will you be doing and so on.

We typically "dress" in a way that fits our particular style.
Some prefer business dress, or functional, some casual or outlandish.
I use this anaolgy because the things you carry as a businessman, or in a dress might be different than what I wear as a casual/functional type.

So, with that in mind, just like clothing (base layer, mid layer, outer layer) I arrange my gear into three "lines".
A brief description and pictures to follow.

First Line:
The first line kit are the things immediately on your person; your keys, wallet and whatever else you choose to carry.
For me, this is my most important line. These are the things I absolutely cannot do without in a "survival" situation, regardless of which type it may be.
If I ran out the door due to a fire, or was my boat capsized... if a nuke goes off - these are the things that are "on my person". It's geared towards a short, intense situation that is potentially life threatening:
First Line

Pictured:
Thumb Drive - 2GB
CRKT M21-04
Leatherman (terrible, but issued) Multitool
Lighter
Cellular Telephone (also a piece of crap)
15 Round Magazine (9mm 124gr TAP)
Glock 19, 9mm
Hammerhead Retractible Pistol Lanyard (For marine environments)

 

 

 

 

Second Line:
These are the things that are usually very near at hand, easy to carry, and make life significantly easier. These come with me to the Airport, in the car, to the range, or when I'm out exploring/adventuring. It represents an intermediary between gear for "short term" survival, and "long term" surivival. It suppliments either well, but is geared to provide equipment for a problem lasting between 1-5 days:
Second Line

 Pictured:
M51 Engineer bag
Petzl Headlamp
(3) Parker Pens
(2) Sharpie Pens
(1) Rite-in-the-Rain Notepad
2 Cyalume Flares
(3) pairs of Rubber Surgical Gloves
(1) Roll of Gauze
EMT Sheers (hard to see)
MRE "spice pack"
Zip Ties
Snare Wire/Fish Hooks
Wilderness Medical Kit
50' Paracord
Magnesium block
Compass
Garmin GPS and Kestrel Aneometer

Third Line:
The "third line" of gear is the "Get out of Dodge" bag.
This bag contains what I'll use to construct both a temporary and permanent shelter, treat more severe wounds, and eat for the first 7 days. For sustanance, I keep 7 MRE Entrees in the cardboard in a pouch - I keep the cardboard for firestarter.
Third Line

Pictured:
MOD 3 Sleep System
Eagle Becker (Medium) Pack
Toiletries kit (Unscented only)
Toilet Paper
Medical Kit (Military)
Mess Kit
Poncho
MRE's, Various delicious entrees
(2) cold weather shirts
(2) warm weather shirts
(2) cold weather socks
(2) warm weather socks
(2) Instant soup
Tea Kettle (filled with goodies)
Gaff Hook
300' Paracord
Spork
Pocket Chainsaw

 

 

 

 

 

As with all things, the most important variable is the amount of knowledge, skill and determination you possess.
Two sayings that I keep with me as well:
"The more you carry in your head, the less you carry on your back"
"Persistance beats resistance"

Cheers!

Aaron

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Interesting, thanks, Aaron.

 

SG

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Glad to help!

Cheers!

Aaron

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

I meant to add that I appreciate your work in putting that together.

 

SG

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Heheh, thank you my friend!

I hope that this is "useful" for people to decide what suits their style. Not everyone wants to or can carry a pistol every day, but certain items and tools can really make your life a lot easier.

Over the years, I've tried all sorts of different things between preparedness and being avid about primitive camping and fishing, so I hope to take some of the learning curve out of equipment.

The real challenge is getting skilled!
Ideally, everyone should be able to collect water, start a fire, select a site and build a shelter that traps heat in and water out.

Thank you again,

Cheers!

Aaron

 

SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 10 2008
Posts: 1499
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

These are interesting replies. Not quite what I had in mind in my original post. I also have Emergency Kits. One for the house and one that travels in the car with me. They include a lot of the items mentioned in the above posts. However, I see things that I had not thought of, so this has been useful in that respect.

What I had originally intended for this discussion was to remind people that we all accumulate a varied amount of important documents and/or precious family items. If they were lost due to a disaster, you would have a very difficult time recreating them. Some items, such as original family papers or physical items, may be absolutely irretrievable if lost.

So besides your emergency supplies, have you given thought to what important papers, photo's, priceless family documents, expensive jewelry, gold, silver, etc. that you would want close to hand if you had to leave your house at a moments notice (due to fire or tornado or flood)?

ao's picture
ao
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 4 2009
Posts: 2220
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Aaron,

Thanks for all the work on your part, as always.  Interesting selection.  Two questions:

Where're the water related supplies (i.e. bottle, filter, purification supplies, or ...?)?

Why the gaff hook?

rocketgirl1's picture
rocketgirl1
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 11 2009
Posts: 230
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Hey Aaron and Sam,

Are you surprised to see this thread revived since your last post was in march?  Thanks for the suggestions Sam and Aaron you really went the extra mile with the photos, etc.  Very fine.  I would just like to add that if you live in extreme heat like us in Vegas, you may want to add some things.  We've included,

personal misters

battery operated fan

portable ice compress ($1.79 at walmart, you squeeze the chemical pouch to activate)

bandannas (priceless in their uses)

Gatorade powder

small umbrella

sunblock

walkie-talkies

so much more you could do but this is just in addition.  You may want to add some motrin or tylenol too and definitely your sunglasses and SPF chapstick. 

Oh ya, a calling card too.

 

 

SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 10 2008
Posts: 1499
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

rocketgirl1,

Are you surprised to see this thread revived since your last post was in march?

Very much so. However, I've seen it happen before. You never know when someone will happen upon an older thread and decide to revive it.

portable ice compress ($1.79 at walmart, you squeeze the chemical pouch to activate)

If you're a Costco member, you can get a real deal on ice packs on costco.com. I recently ordered, and received, the following (works out to approx. 48 cents each):

5X6 Disposable
Instant Ice Packs
48 Pack
Item # 365932
$22.99
Shipping & Handling included *

 

I also purchased two sets of Motorola 2-way radios:

Motorola
FRS 25-Mile
Two-way Radio
2-pack
Item # 198710
$54.99
Plus Shipping & Handling

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

RocketGirl,

Thanks for the kind words! 
To answer your question, YES!!! 
I'm very happy to see this thread "revived".

I sincerely hope the trend will continue. 
My opinion only, but if you haven't at least assembled a BOB - you are wrong.

Discussion of what you packed, why and photos make for better conversation.

Especially, while in use. If I can get a few days off, I'd love to get out for a 3 day camp and get some fresh pictures.

Cheers!

Aaron

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

ao,

Sorry, I missed you questions.

Quote:

Aaron,

Thanks for all the work on your part, as always.  Interesting selection.  Two questions:

Where're the water related supplies (i.e. bottle, filter, purification supplies, or ...?)?

Why the gaff hook?

I have a Nalgene bottle with a metal cup that I use to boil water. Typically, I scavenge and strain using a variety of methods:
1. Straining through charcoal and socks; using a scavenged bottle as a medium.
2. Strain water through the shemagh and into the teapot for boiling.

The water purification tabs don't do me right, and I've been looking into a katadyne filter, but one of my main requirements for kit is that it can't be "consumable" unless it's a firestarter, or sustenance..

That said I'm in the PNW, so rainwater collection, and water sources are in no short supply.
For longer trips, my backpack is outfitted with a 100oz camelback, which I typically fill out of the nalgene.

The Gaff hook is a compliment to the Gill net that I neither possess or would ever consider using, seeing as I'm not entitled to gill netting as a non-American Indian. That said, if all hell breaks loose, it's smarter than a trot line or a baited hook attached to a bell.

Cheers, and thanks for the questions! Always fun to discuss survival kit ;)

Aaron

Toltecas's picture
Toltecas
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 28 2009
Posts: 1
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

 Whether it is a 72 hour kit, a Bug out Bag or in food storage, these items are a necessity.

 

Lets just say out of ten items, numbers 1, 2 & 3 is a good water filter. You cannot store enough & surely cannot carry enough water. Many emergencies leave you surrounded with water but cannot drink any of it because of contamination. You will die from lack of water long before lack of food. Put your money into a good filter.
There are a few good brands out there, just do your homework. I like the filter straws that filter as you suck. Do not use them for your main filter ut they are a great back-up filter & weigh nearly nothing & take up no space. They are made by Aquamira, I would not buy them off the Aquamira site however, I found them cheaper just by googling, Aquamira straw filter.
 
Ipecac is a great idea to have around. What would you do if you or someone you know eats or drinks something potentially poisoness? It is just a good idea.
 
Hydrogen pyroxide cleans wounds really well. Infected wounds can lead to illness, loss of limbs or loss of life. You will not always be where medical attention is available or where the environment is even clean. Simple cuts can turn into major life threatening events if not taken care of. It can also kill some bugs as a last resort in water.
 
The main reason to store food or have food in a 72 hour kit or bug out bag is for nutrients & sustain life. When emergency strikes you need to drink water & have nutrients. Your body uses 4-10 times the water, vitamins & minerals under stress. Your immune system drops when you do not have the nutrients. Fatigue will also come quicker. A great product I stumbled upon is called Life caps. They have all the vitamins & minerals, iodine & even a touch of natural sugar to keep your blood sugar normal to keep you healthy. They are assimulated in your body within 20-25 minutes.
 
I have used these capsules on a 21 day desert survival in Northern Utah. I would open the capsule & dump it in my mouth. They taste good. They are of the highest quality all natural vitamins & minerals. They are light & you can carry 4 months worth in a relatively small space. I purchased 25 bottles & then found a coupon code to save 33%. You can find out more at lifecaps.net. The coupon code is "healthcap".
 
Anti-diarrheal pills are important just in case. If you are unlucky enough to get diarrhea, you need to stop it ASAP, because it can dehydrate you in a hurry along with wasting nutrition.
 
I go on one or two survival trips a year. I hope these items help you complete your 72 hour kit or bug out bag.
 
Any one of these items are potentially life saving.

 

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 643
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

My current new BOB is an Alps Denali

Contents

Platypus hydration system 3 liter, plus 6 liters back up

Platypus water "grab" bag, and filtration system

Aquamira Filtration straws plus fliters for 200 gallons

3 layer GI Modular sleep system.

5 days MRE's

GPS

1 Motorola Talkabout T980RSAME FRS/GMRS Walkie Talkie with Throat Mike, PTT extension, Ear bud

Cell Phone

Mylar Blanket

Medium First aid kit, Sutures and needle, topical antibiotic cream, band aids, immodium, 20x Augmentin antibiotic capsules, analgesics, bandages, sponges, disinfectant Crazy Glue etc.

100' Rope

500' Para cord

Full Change of clothing (pants' underwear, shirt, Vest, socks)

Heavy weather gear (Level 3 ECWS clothing)

Ammunition (5.56, 40 S&W, 12 gauge)

Spare Mags, and gun cleaning supplies.

Remington 870 Shotgun (Strapped between my back and the pack for easier retrieval.

On Self,

Clothes, boots

Vest, containing

2 Swedish firesteels

4 full Magazines for 40 S&W

4 Full Magazines for 5.56mm

20 rounds cocktail 12 Gauge

Gerber combat/survival knife

Belt Webbing containing

Compass

Leatherman multitool

Magnesium block and fire starting materials

Water canteen

Small hatchet

2x punch knife

Small first aid kit, band aids, topical antibiotic, small sponge, alcohol wipes.

Springfield XDm

Shouldered Robinson XCR

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

The total weight of your BOB  items is...

 

 

SG

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 643
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Normal BOB weight is 65 lbs, plus the weight of the weapons

Used to do 30 mile forced marches in under 6 hours with more weight than that.

nickbert's picture
nickbert
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jan 14 2009
Posts: 1208
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Hmm I must have missed this thread on the first go-around; as much as I try to keep up I find my time to read and post here is limited.  Better late than never!

SamLinder wrote:

So besides your emergency supplies, have you given thought to what important papers, photo's, priceless family documents, expensive jewelry, gold, silver, etc. that you would want close to hand if you had to leave your house at a moments notice (due to fire or tornado or flood)?

My wife and I figured the best approach was to keep our physical cash, gold/silver, jewelry, vital documents (birth certificates, Titles, etc.), photo album, and handguns (w/ammo and accessories) all in the top shelf of my safe, and kept an empty duffelbag in the lower corner to put everything into.  Seemed to be the best combination of convenience in day-to-day life and speed/accessibility in an emergency.  Another part of the reasoning behind keeping it all in the safe was to have some level of protection for said things in the event of a fire while we're away. 

Our bug-out-bag also happened to be in the same room, and after a few rehearsal drills I was able to gather all said items in the safe and my bug-out-bag and leave the house in just under 2 minutes.  This was going from sitting on the couch with shoes off, to being out the door with the bags and wearing my boots and coat.  And my best guess is that if the option exists to leave by car, I can load up my rifles, all ammo, a substantial amount of nonperishable food, and fill-up/load two 5-gallon collapsible water jugs into the car and drive away in about 10 minutes.  The biggest reason I haven't attempted that yet is because I was living in Denver at the time and didn't want my neighbors to see me carrying my AR in the open (most people in the neighborhood, and to an extent the city too, are very anti-gun and I didn't want to take that chance they'd freak out call the cops).  I have yet to practice this with my wife and baby, but my own practice drills operated under the assumption that I carry all the gear and her task is to prep the baby for travel.  We will practice once I've finished moving them up to AK in August.  I expect our time will suffer, but if we could get out of the house in under 4 minutes I would be happy

- Nickbert 

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

That's half my weight, more with the weapons, and only a few years above my age.

It's the Winston Churchill speech for some of us.

 

SG

 

 

SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 10 2008
Posts: 1499
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?
nickbert wrote:

Hmm I must have missed this thread on the first go-around; as much as I try to keep up I find my time to read and post here is limited.  Better late than never!

SamLinder wrote:

So besides your emergency supplies, have you given thought to what important papers, photo's, priceless family documents, expensive jewelry, gold, silver, etc. that you would want close to hand if you had to leave your house at a moments notice (due to fire or tornado or flood)?

My wife and I figured the best approach was to keep our physical cash, gold/silver, jewelry, vital documents (birth certificates, Titles, etc.), photo album, and handguns (w/ammo and accessories) all in the top shelf of my safe, and kept an empty duffelbag in the lower corner to put everything into.  Seemed to be the best combination of convenience in day-to-day life and speed/accessibility in an emergency.  Another part of the reasoning behind keeping it all in the safe was to have some level of protection for said things in the event of a fire while we're away. 

Our bug-out-bag also happened to be in the same room, and after a few rehearsal drills I was able to gather all said items in the safe and my bug-out-bag and leave the house in just under 2 minutes.  This was going from sitting on the couch with shoes off, to being out the door with the bags and wearing my boots and coat.  And my best guess is that if the option exists to leave by car, I can load up my rifles, all ammo, a substantial amount of nonperishable food, and fill-up/load two 5-gallon collapsible water jugs into the car and drive away in about 10 minutes.  The biggest reason I haven't attempted that yet is because I was living in Denver at the time and didn't want my neighbors to see me carrying my AR in the open (most people in the neighborhood, and to an extent the city too, are very anti-gun and I didn't want to take that chance they'd freak out call the cops).  I have yet to practice this with my wife and baby, but my own practice drills operated under the assumption that I carry all the gear and her task is to prep the baby for travel.  We will practice once I've finished moving them up to AK in August.  I expect our time will suffer, but if we could get out of the house in under 4 minutes I would be happy

- Nickbert 

 

nickbert,

That's very good thinking re the safe. I'm also doubly impressed at the way you actually did a real run-through to see how fast you could accomplish the bug-out. Even I haven't done that yet! Kudos to you - I'm sure you'll do real fine in an emergency. Two thumbs up!

SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 10 2008
Posts: 1499
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?
capesurvivor wrote:

That's half my weight, more with the weapons, and only a few years above my age.

It's the Winston Churchill speech for some of us.

 

SG

Winston Churchill said, "... the New World steps forth ..."

That wouldn't be the NWO by any chance?

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 643
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Steady Sam

No it was actually confirmed to mean US involvement (the New World as it was then known)

CapeSurvivor, about 50% body weight is pretty much normal for an effective survival pack, most of the stuff is selected based on my battle packs I used in #2 Para, so the Winston Churchill quote was surprisingly apt. Fortunately as you move the pack gets a little lighter (you drink the water and eat the MRE's and hopefully the ammunition doesn't go down). With a good well fitted pack you hardly notice the weight in anything but your legs.

Oh and I do have a document section too, that contains critical ID (both passports, naturalization, etc.) documents and currencies too including good old American Express and Visa (you never know), just in case I need them.

capesurvivor's picture
capesurvivor
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 12 2008
Posts: 963
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

That's pretty funny. I can see you pulling into a strange camp somewhere, tired, hungry, out of supplies and saying.."do you take American Express?"

SG

SamLinder's picture
SamLinder
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Jul 10 2008
Posts: 1499
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?
capesurvivor wrote:

That's pretty funny. I can see you pulling into a strange camp somewhere, tired, hungry, out of supplies and saying.."do you take American Express?"

SG

R O F L! 

Very clever, SG!

A. M.'s picture
A. M.
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 22 2008
Posts: 2368
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Gungnir,

Brother - you travel heavy!

I generally keep my bug out gear down around 35-50lbs. Which is almost a third of my body weight at the maximum.
Less than a quarter ideally. That said, I have my "lines", so I can add or subtract as needed. My EDC (Everyday Carry) only weighs about 5 lbs maximum. The Carry bag perhaps 10-15 and another 25 in the backpack.
 

Pictures mates! They tell a thousand words!

Cheers =D

Aaron

Gungnir's picture
Gungnir
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Mar 2 2009
Posts: 643
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Yep, but remember that our circumstances are likely to be vastly different.

Seattle wise it's too heavy, sub arctic wise it's likely about right, and that's where I'm currently targetting.

The modular Bivvy bag(s) ammunition and the water are the heaviest, I wouldn't take level 3 EWCS clothing either in Seattle and only one and the Gore-tex outer of my bag (in case its raining). Which will lighten up as I go, and I can still yomp at about a 5 mile an hour tick across clear fields, slows through woods and across rugged terrain.

Of course I do have weight distributed not just in the pack but on my belt and vest too, one other benefit of a heavier pack is, better protection as cover if needed.

Finally although there are 5 days of rations, I can make snares with either the Paracord or some wire, for some additional sustenance from small critters. I'd estimate that I can survive for probably up to a month if I can get enough from trapping, and have a water supply.

I'm currently re-assembling it, so when I have it ready I'll post the full version packed and unpacked.

PlicketyCat's picture
PlicketyCat
Status: Platinum Member (Offline)
Joined: Feb 26 2009
Posts: 680
Re: What's in your "Bug-out Bag"?

Ok - I'll chime in since I'm the "organizer" in the family :)  

Sam: Important documents and keepsakes, we keep a small totable file box with a handle (like this one, but ours has a lock) that contains: birth certificate, marriage license, G's naturalization certificate, passports, social security cards, deeds, last will & living will, firearms proof of ownership, vehicle titles & insurance cards, pet records (immunization & health certificate), and a list of physical assets. We also have a thin binder in there which contains I.C.E. data; a list of medical conditions, allergies, medications & healthcare contact information;  a list of all financial assets (including phone#, acct#, PW, etc); and our regular address book. 

In case of a fire or other immediate evac situation, it's an easy grab-n-go. We also have all this information scanned as PDF files on a USB pen drive in each of our BOBs just in case... although many agencies will NOT accept anything other than a "stamped" original or certified copy.

Aaron: Gungnir & I will post pics and an updated list once we're done reassembling and restocking our BOBs for true wilderness situation. Might be a few days since our sleep system is at the dry cleaners. 

Basically, we have a similar system to yours, with an additional layer in there. "Immediate" is stuff that is always on our bodies -- est. 1-3 days. "Short term" is kept in a small knapsack and contains things that would fit in our belt, vest & jacket -- est. 3-5 days. Our "medium" survival kit is in a stuff-sack inside our "long-term" survival kit, but it can be easily removed and added to our "short term" knapsack (once we've redistributed) as well -- est. 5-10 days. Long term -- we could essentially live on "forever".  Basically, short, medium and long are a nesting system.

Yes, we do travel heavy, but only if we're running with our "long" kit. Long kit runs about 65 lbs (3 + 2 liters of water). Medium kit runs closer to 40 lbs (3 liters of water). Short is about 20 lbs (2 liters of water) distributed all over the body. Immediate is about 10 lbs... mostly tools, weapons & ammo (and 1 liter of water)

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or Register to post comments