What tools will be good for the transition?

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falsealarm's picture
falsealarm
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 18 2011
Posts: 2
What tools will be good for the transition?

I guess a good tool to have will be one that will:

 

A. Give a sginificant advantage in doing some work.

 

B.will be hard to manufacture, so there will be need for such tools, and only you will have one.

 

C.will need training to use, so you will be the only one in the area able to use it, so there will be no point in stealing it.

 

I haven't thought about it much but things that come to my mind:

Topographical maps, Laser pointers, calculators...

what do you think?

 

 

 

Wendy S. Delmater's picture
Wendy S. Delmater
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Dec 13 2009
Posts: 1988
tools

Good topic, falsealarm.

Hubby hopes to be a repair guy post crash. Tools are a very important part of that. Hubby is a building systems technician (fire alarm, security, HVAC, computer) and we have to duplicate the tools he would normally borrow from his company work van. The biggest expenses will be ladders and an oxy/aceteylene welding set..

You bring up a good point: if you have tools but they get stolen, what good were they? Camoflage during any unrest will be a great idea, but luckily we have a large shed. For home you simply want to have a basic toolkit but I have to stress that they must not be POWER tools and they have to be high quality. Think Sears Craftman hammers and contractor-grade everything else. Stock up on work gloves, too. . . cotton AND leather ones.

I'm concentrating on gardening tools: decent rakes and shovels and hoes and such.  A high quality hand spade and hand rake and extra lumber for a square foot garden are just as important as compost and seed. On thing we discovered is that a nice brass hose sprayer lasts nearly forever; the cheap plastic ones are not the way to go.

 

txgirl69's picture
txgirl69
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Apr 20 2009
Posts: 96
transition tools

We have bought extra garden tools, axes and saws (with replacement blades), multi-tools, ratcheting cargo straps and a heavy duty come-a-long... extra packs of leather and rubber coated gloves and good quality rain gear. Lots of Craftsman tools and hand powered drills.

I also bought a neat little manual (push) operated cultivator (lehmans.com) with an extra set of replacement tines. I haven't tried it yet, it looks so nice, I don't want to get it dirty

- We are always looking for sales, to pick up something we don't have duplicates of....

Since I have cattle, we also stock a few extra ropes and some fencing materials, feed buckets and even a medical kit for animal first aid. Plus a stack of 2x4s and 2x6s, fence posts and t-posts.

Anything I use now, I want extras. And, if circumstances deteriorate to the point of bartering, I want to have some things people will need and use...

Bananacarrot's picture
Bananacarrot
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Sep 20 2011
Posts: 13
Tools

This is a great topic...I hadn't really thought about building up an arsenal of tools but that does seem like a smart idea.  I agree with the post about gardening tools and non-electric handtools being particularly important. Two things I have also considered are sewing machines and canning equipment (though it's probably difficult to find those sewing machines that work with a foot pedal rather than electric).  I saw somewhere how you can making a washing machine by using a bicycle (pedaling rotates a canister that you place your clothes inside) - seemed rather clever.

Of course the trick is to find the funds, time, and space for these kinds of things...

 

 

laura welsh's picture
laura welsh
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 6 2009
Posts: 13
good comment from SHTF website
  • I am sorry, I don't know how to create new thread, so I put this inside existing thread...I thought the comments were worthwhile...I just cut and pasted them.
     
     
    Scooter says:

    I think we are in for a long hard ride in the coming years, and I may be a pessimist, but I think smart people better get ready to defend themselves and their family for a challenging decade.

    I am not the smartest guy in the room, but I can also see we are being treated like sheep by the mass media and the Gov’t.

    The greedy Wall Street bankers and politicians are robbing us, and our kids of their future opportunity by raiding the treasury right in front of our eyes, and we cheer them on.

    Recently my sister in law and I got into a discussion, after she read an article I had forwarded to my brother on “being prepared for an uncertain future”

    Rich, you believe that our prepping is a bit of an “overreaction” and people are playing on our fears:

    Well, this is where I am at.

    You certainly could be right, and when times are scary, people do prey on our fears.

    But the fears of being thought of as a freak, weird, or an extremist I think, allow many people to bury their heads in the sand and avoid even the most basic preparedness.

    I don’t say go out and build a bunker and spend 50K getting prepared for the apocalypse, unless you want to, but if there is a short term interruption of goods and services due to economic, medical, or whether related events, I would rather be prepared than panic.

    I look at it as Insurance, I have life, health, homeowners, auto, boat, camper, short and long term disability, and an umbrella policy to “Protect” my family, and how much am I spending a year on that, quite a bit.

    I buy it “hoping” I will never need it, but wouldn’t go without it.

    I see the basic long term planning for potentially difficult times as a similar investment. All you need to do is look at history to see the kind of hardships unprepared people face in tough times. Can it happen again? Maybe, maybe not.

    Below are 2 main stream links “The American Red Cross”, and the “Department of Homeland Security”. When I look at the basic items they say “people” should have available, I bet 98% of your friends and neighbors don’t.

    http://www.redcross.org/services/prepare/0,1082,0_239_,00.html

    http://www.dhs.gov/xcitizens/editorial_0711.shtm

    The fact that most people don’t have the basic skills to be self sufficient, let alone the items, or knowledge of where to get the items they need.

    If and when a crisis happens, and it will…..Most people will find them in a desperate position standing on someone else’s doorstep or in the street begging for help.

    I think it is a discussion that every family in America should have, then pray or meditate, if God is not your thing, and act accordingly to what your heart & head say you should and can do.

    Being self sufficient is being an optimist. Not merely because I think I will make it through the crisis, but because of the (possibly subconscious) hope that something good will emerge in the aftermath.

    My modest preparation springs from the knowledge that I am the protector of my family. It is on me to do what I reasonably can do to protect my family from in the event of hardship and/or disaster. (After watching [Hurricane] Katrina, it seems apparent that the government cannot do that.)

    Any reasonable person knows that there is at least a fathomable chance that our nation’s run of blessing/luck will end (or be suspended) at some point in the future.

    Nothing lasts forever. If and when that time comes, I would never forgive myself if my family suffered unnecessarily because I did not take reasonable steps to prepare for such a time.

    In addition to that, I think it’s just plain fun to learn about this stuff.

    I prepare because I’m a libertarian with conservative tendencies, at times feeling like an endangered species or “minority” and I’m tenaciously defiant to those who would like to see my “kind” exterminated.

    I am equipped with a few trusted friends that are peers in regard to my views and they have begun to prepare also. I discern a negative force is taking action to see my country’s sovereignty given away.

    I am “HIGHLY” motivated to be a hindrance to that spirit.

    I prepare because I awoke to how fragile our economy really is and saw how foolishly I’d been behaving in the past (assuming life would always be normal) and am in the process of repenting of any residual foolish, attitudes and habits I have.

    I prepare because if things ever happen, I will have multiple skill sets that can help a number of people in a number of different situations. I believe I was created to help people, when possible; I gather info, educate, discuss and leave food for thought for those who are unprepared, but willing to listen and consider my views on the subject.

    Why am I preparing? For the simple reason that I live in the middle of the mid-west. Bad winters, heavy snow, and ice storms. The rest of the year heavy rains, floods, tornados, et cetera.

    You can’t depend on the government to come through when needed, so if you don’t have what you need than you are out of luck!

    You have to be able to get by on what you have or fabricate something to do the job needed.

    I have NEVER depended on the government to help me with my life, and I really don’t think they have the capacity.

    It will be you and friends and neighbors pulling together that will make the difference.

    I prepare for me and mine so that we may be able to help others if need be.

    Why do I prepare? Probably because I read too much survival type stuff.

    Because surviving to me is so much more interesting than succumbing.

    I always assumed something, a war, or a pandemic, could change life as I knew it, and it never occurred to me not to want to survive.

    Bottom line:

    I owe it to my family to be prepared. I could not bear to look into their eyes as they look to me for help and have to say “Sorry.”

    I prep, not because I’m smarter than anyone else, but because from what I see, there just is no other choice.

    I do it for my family; my beloved wife who humors me but thinks I’m slightly nuts, my children who love me but roll their eyes whenever I speak about what is happening around us.

    Look, I don’t have any college degree or any “fancy book smarts”; no one would call me well educated or all that bright. But I can see what I can see.

    I read, study, research, and from my angle, I believe we are going to be challenged big time in the not so distant future, so I plod on.

    I don’t have a retreat, I don’t have a bunker or fallout shelter, I do have a few acres (40) some solar panels, a small green house, weapons & ammo, medical supplies, some extra food, fuel, tools, seeds, a stocked pond and some really cool ducks, chickens and a few milk goats. I keep on doing the best with what I have, what I know, and what I can afford.

    Will we survive whatever that comes? Heck if I know. But I’m a damn fool if I do not give it my best shot.

    As I get older and wiser, I believe all our days are numbered and have value. In those number of days I believe we are to protect and provide for our own selves, our families and so on.

    Examples in history are numerous how people were commanded to defend their homes, their cities, their neighbors, and their land.

    Unless we (like some were) are destined to go into Babylonian captivity I see no other choice.

    I am taking what steps I feel necessary to survive in a societal collapse of infrastructure because I realize that the more intricate a system of living becomes, the more possible facets of failure are therefore created.

    As the machine known as Society has grown in scale and complexity, so do the required aspects of its function; increasing the number of things that can go wrong, thus eventually causing a critical failure of the system. In the army we called S.N.A.F.U.

    With the statistical (and historical) inevitability staring one in the face, how can someone NOT do everything within your power to be prepared?

    While I had read about survival-ism and planning for a couple of years starting with Y2K, the importance of having some sort of plan didn’t hit me hard until [Hurricane] Katrina hit. All of a sudden the importance of having a plan & supplies is very important

    I’m preparing for my wife and my children, because I can, and because it gives me a feeling of confidence. I say “because I can” since most of my acquaintances don’t have a clue of the probable upcoming changes in society, but of those that do have a clue, well they can’t prepare.

    They can’t prepare for because they’re financially tapped out by having been brainwashed into living on credit today figuring somebody else will take care of them tomorrow, but it won’t be me and mine, and it’s not that I wouldn’t help anybody, but I don’t want all our acquaintances coming to live with us.

    I have a good life and am blessed to be able to make preparations for what may come. And I am thankful for every additional day I have to get better prepared, and, for the most part, my beautiful wife is a supporter of me and is on board.

    I am preparing because I believe the threats to our way of life are at hand. We are in a global war with extremists that want us to die in the name of Allah.

    China strength’s grows, our borders are not protected. Our government is shredding the constitution and spending us into a financial position we will not be able to sustain.

    Natural disasters, environmental concerns (see BP and the Gulf), the basic depravity and selfishness of man–is reason enough.

    Many other equivalent societies in this century have fallen, why is America better? It is inevitable; one disaster will prove the wisdom of preparing.

    1. Life is worth living.
    2. I want to be around if there is any defending of this nation to be done.

    It’s something that was raised in me. Maybe it is the Boy Scout’s motto of always being prepared or just the human instinct of survival, I see something on the horizon, but I won’t back down.

    Not to mention I get to justify spending money on my home & the sanctuary I love.

    I am trying to prepare because it is the right and responsible thing to do for our family, friends, neighbors, and country. If we all became part of the solution, then there would be no problem.

    It is obvious that our complex society is too interdependent to survive major interruptions and we have numerous examples to look at (the L.A. riots, Hurricane Katrina, and such).

    To believe that a major interruption of services could not occur is delusional. The empirical evidence is right in front of us.

    The family which is prepared has far fewer worries.

    Do I believe we are headed for the end of the world as we know it? Not particularly. Do I believe that we will see significant disruptions that will affect us for 10 days or so? Yes.

    Disruptions lasting to 30 days or beyond? Less likely, but I plan for that nonetheless. Our leaders have constantly cajoled us to have a supply of food and other necessities (see the above links) and my guess is they know something we haven’t heard yet.

    Most pundits state that human beings are constantly evolving. The point they have ignored or can’t see is that the evolvement of the human race in the last 50 years has been deterioration, not advancement.

    I prepare because I see it as part of the natural cycle of human civilization. Something in us wants to forget the lessons of what makes us a great society and start living on borrowed riches and capabilities.

    Eventually, that living beyond our means catches up with us via a natural disaster, economic collapse or societal conflict.

    If we were not to prepare then we are doomed to fail and live miserably under the dictates of someone else.

    If we prepare we are not guaranteed to have prepared for the right situation, or enough, but at least we have a much better than average chance.

    In the end, I am an optimist. No matter how bad things get they will eventually get better.

    We can speed up our own recovery and that of our community’s by preparing now.

    If we do not, then we may end up wallowing in misery and struggling for the barest necessities.

    It just takes discipline and short-term sacrifice.

    Hey, we may all look back in 10-20 years and have a good laugh over a couple of thousand dollars spent on stuff we never needed, but it is going to be very a sad day if we have to look our friends and neighbors in the face and say…

    Sorry, I can’t help you, you should have prepared!

laura welsh's picture
laura welsh
Status: Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 6 2009
Posts: 13
good comment from SHTF website
  • I am sorry, I don't know how to create new thread, so I put this inside existing thread...I thought the comments were worthwhile...I just cut and pasted them.
     
     
    Scooter says:

    I think we are in for a long hard ride in the coming years, and I may be a pessimist, but I think smart people better get ready to defend themselves and their family for a challenging decade.

    I am not the smartest guy in the room, but I can also see we are being treated like sheep by the mass media and the Gov’t.

    The greedy Wall Street bankers and politicians are robbing us, and our kids of their future opportunity by raiding the treasury right in front of our eyes, and we cheer them on.

    Recently my sister in law and I got into a discussion, after she read an article I had forwarded to my brother on “being prepared for an uncertain future”

    Rich, you believe that our prepping is a bit of an “overreaction” and people are playing on our fears:

    Well, this is where I am at.

    You certainly could be right, and when times are scary, people do prey on our fears.

    But the fears of being thought of as a freak, weird, or an extremist I think, allow many people to bury their heads in the sand and avoid even the most basic preparedness.

    I don’t say go out and build a bunker and spend 50K getting prepared for the apocalypse, unless you want to, but if there is a short term interruption of goods and services due to economic, medical, or whether related events, I would rather be prepared than panic.

    I look at it as Insurance, I have life, health, homeowners, auto, boat, camper, short and long term disability, and an umbrella policy to “Protect” my family, and how much am I spending a year on that, quite a bit.

    I buy it “hoping” I will never need it, but wouldn’t go without it.

    I see the basic long term planning for potentially difficult times as a similar investment. All you need to do is look at history to see the kind of hardships unprepared people face in tough times. Can it happen again? Maybe, maybe not.

    Below are 2 main stream links “The American Red Cross”, and the “Department of Homeland Security”. When I look at the basic items they say “people” should have available, I bet 98% of your friends and neighbors don’t.

    http://www.redcross.org/services/prepare/0,1082,0_239_,00.html

    http://www.dhs.gov/xcitizens/editorial_0711.shtm

    The fact that most people don’t have the basic skills to be self sufficient, let alone the items, or knowledge of where to get the items they need.

    If and when a crisis happens, and it will…..Most people will find them in a desperate position standing on someone else’s doorstep or in the street begging for help.

    I think it is a discussion that every family in America should have, then pray or meditate, if God is not your thing, and act accordingly to what your heart & head say you should and can do.

    Being self sufficient is being an optimist. Not merely because I think I will make it through the crisis, but because of the (possibly subconscious) hope that something good will emerge in the aftermath.

    My modest preparation springs from the knowledge that I am the protector of my family. It is on me to do what I reasonably can do to protect my family from in the event of hardship and/or disaster. (After watching [Hurricane] Katrina, it seems apparent that the government cannot do that.)

    Any reasonable person knows that there is at least a fathomable chance that our nation’s run of blessing/luck will end (or be suspended) at some point in the future.

    Nothing lasts forever. If and when that time comes, I would never forgive myself if my family suffered unnecessarily because I did not take reasonable steps to prepare for such a time.

    In addition to that, I think it’s just plain fun to learn about this stuff.

    I prepare because I’m a libertarian with conservative tendencies, at times feeling like an endangered species or “minority” and I’m tenaciously defiant to those who would like to see my “kind” exterminated.

    I am equipped with a few trusted friends that are peers in regard to my views and they have begun to prepare also. I discern a negative force is taking action to see my country’s sovereignty given away.

    I am “HIGHLY” motivated to be a hindrance to that spirit.

    I prepare because I awoke to how fragile our economy really is and saw how foolishly I’d been behaving in the past (assuming life would always be normal) and am in the process of repenting of any residual foolish, attitudes and habits I have.

    I prepare because if things ever happen, I will have multiple skill sets that can help a number of people in a number of different situations. I believe I was created to help people, when possible; I gather info, educate, discuss and leave food for thought for those who are unprepared, but willing to listen and consider my views on the subject.

    Why am I preparing? For the simple reason that I live in the middle of the mid-west. Bad winters, heavy snow, and ice storms. The rest of the year heavy rains, floods, tornados, et cetera.

    You can’t depend on the government to come through when needed, so if you don’t have what you need than you are out of luck!

    You have to be able to get by on what you have or fabricate something to do the job needed.

    I have NEVER depended on the government to help me with my life, and I really don’t think they have the capacity.

    It will be you and friends and neighbors pulling together that will make the difference.

    I prepare for me and mine so that we may be able to help others if need be.

    Why do I prepare? Probably because I read too much survival type stuff.

    Because surviving to me is so much more interesting than succumbing.

    I always assumed something, a war, or a pandemic, could change life as I knew it, and it never occurred to me not to want to survive.

    Bottom line:

    I owe it to my family to be prepared. I could not bear to look into their eyes as they look to me for help and have to say “Sorry.”

    I prep, not because I’m smarter than anyone else, but because from what I see, there just is no other choice.

    I do it for my family; my beloved wife who humors me but thinks I’m slightly nuts, my children who love me but roll their eyes whenever I speak about what is happening around us.

    Look, I don’t have any college degree or any “fancy book smarts”; no one would call me well educated or all that bright. But I can see what I can see.

    I read, study, research, and from my angle, I believe we are going to be challenged big time in the not so distant future, so I plod on.

    I don’t have a retreat, I don’t have a bunker or fallout shelter, I do have a few acres (40) some solar panels, a small green house, weapons & ammo, medical supplies, some extra food, fuel, tools, seeds, a stocked pond and some really cool ducks, chickens and a few milk goats. I keep on doing the best with what I have, what I know, and what I can afford.

    Will we survive whatever that comes? Heck if I know. But I’m a damn fool if I do not give it my best shot.

    As I get older and wiser, I believe all our days are numbered and have value. In those number of days I believe we are to protect and provide for our own selves, our families and so on.

    Examples in history are numerous how people were commanded to defend their homes, their cities, their neighbors, and their land.

    Unless we (like some were) are destined to go into Babylonian captivity I see no other choice.

    I am taking what steps I feel necessary to survive in a societal collapse of infrastructure because I realize that the more intricate a system of living becomes, the more possible facets of failure are therefore created.

    As the machine known as Society has grown in scale and complexity, so do the required aspects of its function; increasing the number of things that can go wrong, thus eventually causing a critical failure of the system. In the army we called S.N.A.F.U.

    With the statistical (and historical) inevitability staring one in the face, how can someone NOT do everything within your power to be prepared?

    While I had read about survival-ism and planning for a couple of years starting with Y2K, the importance of having some sort of plan didn’t hit me hard until [Hurricane] Katrina hit. All of a sudden the importance of having a plan & supplies is very important

    I’m preparing for my wife and my children, because I can, and because it gives me a feeling of confidence. I say “because I can” since most of my acquaintances don’t have a clue of the probable upcoming changes in society, but of those that do have a clue, well they can’t prepare.

    They can’t prepare for because they’re financially tapped out by having been brainwashed into living on credit today figuring somebody else will take care of them tomorrow, but it won’t be me and mine, and it’s not that I wouldn’t help anybody, but I don’t want all our acquaintances coming to live with us.

    I have a good life and am blessed to be able to make preparations for what may come. And I am thankful for every additional day I have to get better prepared, and, for the most part, my beautiful wife is a supporter of me and is on board.

    I am preparing because I believe the threats to our way of life are at hand. We are in a global war with extremists that want us to die in the name of Allah.

    China strength’s grows, our borders are not protected. Our government is shredding the constitution and spending us into a financial position we will not be able to sustain.

    Natural disasters, environmental concerns (see BP and the Gulf), the basic depravity and selfishness of man–is reason enough.

    Many other equivalent societies in this century have fallen, why is America better? It is inevitable; one disaster will prove the wisdom of preparing.

    1. Life is worth living.
    2. I want to be around if there is any defending of this nation to be done.

    It’s something that was raised in me. Maybe it is the Boy Scout’s motto of always being prepared or just the human instinct of survival, I see something on the horizon, but I won’t back down.

    Not to mention I get to justify spending money on my home & the sanctuary I love.

    I am trying to prepare because it is the right and responsible thing to do for our family, friends, neighbors, and country. If we all became part of the solution, then there would be no problem.

    It is obvious that our complex society is too interdependent to survive major interruptions and we have numerous examples to look at (the L.A. riots, Hurricane Katrina, and such).

    To believe that a major interruption of services could not occur is delusional. The empirical evidence is right in front of us.

    The family which is prepared has far fewer worries.

    Do I believe we are headed for the end of the world as we know it? Not particularly. Do I believe that we will see significant disruptions that will affect us for 10 days or so? Yes.

    Disruptions lasting to 30 days or beyond? Less likely, but I plan for that nonetheless. Our leaders have constantly cajoled us to have a supply of food and other necessities (see the above links) and my guess is they know something we haven’t heard yet.

    Most pundits state that human beings are constantly evolving. The point they have ignored or can’t see is that the evolvement of the human race in the last 50 years has been deterioration, not advancement.

    I prepare because I see it as part of the natural cycle of human civilization. Something in us wants to forget the lessons of what makes us a great society and start living on borrowed riches and capabilities.

    Eventually, that living beyond our means catches up with us via a natural disaster, economic collapse or societal conflict.

    If we were not to prepare then we are doomed to fail and live miserably under the dictates of someone else.

    If we prepare we are not guaranteed to have prepared for the right situation, or enough, but at least we have a much better than average chance.

    In the end, I am an optimist. No matter how bad things get they will eventually get better.

    We can speed up our own recovery and that of our community’s by preparing now.

    If we do not, then we may end up wallowing in misery and struggling for the barest necessities.

    It just takes discipline and short-term sacrifice.

    Hey, we may all look back in 10-20 years and have a good laugh over a couple of thousand dollars spent on stuff we never needed, but it is going to be very a sad day if we have to look our friends and neighbors in the face and say…

    Sorry, I can’t help you, you should have prepared!

doorwarrior's picture
doorwarrior
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 13 2009
Posts: 166
tools

We have triple and quadruple of all the basic gardening tools. Its amazing what good tools you can find at a yard sale for almost nothing. I do think non-power tools are best but if you have a decent propane generator with propane in the ground you can get many, many years of use and not have to use alot of manpower out of some power tools. This can be a great time and energy saver. well worth the cost of the system.

Here is a very incomplete list of some uncommon things you may want around

sharpening stones

levels

pipe cutter and threader (pipie should be esy to find but you still have to make it fit)

reloading equipment (this will be a great barter item, the neighbor brings you an empty case and you reload it)

welder oxy/act or a diesel weld/gen kit

basic woodworking tools, never know when you will need to repair that window pane or chair

treadle powered sewing machine, we just refurbished my wifes grandmothers from 1898 it works great

chainfalls, come alongs and a pulley system  for lifting/dragging heavy items

wire rope or cable with attachments

 

Most of these item take some training to use properly but that does not mean someone won't try to steal them. The best defense against theft is a being a good member of your communtiy that is always willing to help others.

Then the true "tool" is you.

Rich

 

butterflywoman's picture
butterflywoman
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Oct 2 2010
Posts: 46
i have a set of dewalt 18wt

i have a set of dewalt 18wt power tools(drill, saws, etc) and i can recharge them with a solar battery bank that i made....tho there is something similar for sale at beprepared.com

i can run my rototiller 1/2 day on 1/2 gallon of gasoline, which if nothing else demonstrates the amount of energy in a gallon of gas. it would take me several days if not weeks to till that much soil with a shovel. i have both shovel and tiller for now.

along those same lines, while i have a pickup, i only go to the store 2x a month versus my neighbor who drives his prius everyday to the store and he  spendsand uses more gas than i do.

go visit any farmer and ask what he/she thinks is necessary to have around....farmers have always known that life is full of surprises..go to farm auctions, and not only can you find lots of goodies, you get a glimpse of one man's efforts to be prepared for anything.

check out a tool rental place, just to see what exists, to see what you might think handy to have

a few 2 x 4 lumber laying around is always good and a large tarp in case 1/2 of your roof is damaged.  how many of you have a 20 x 30 ft tarp laying around?

insurance policies may soon be a thing of the past

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
Open source team creates apocalypse survival kit

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/11/17/50_open_source_tools_civilization/
 

A team of open source enthusiasts is putting together instructions for how to build 50 tools essential to establishing – or reestablishing – a civilization.

The Global Village Construction Set (GVCS) is being developed by the Open Source Ecology (OSE) group, and includes such basic tools as a well drill, steam engine, and brick making machine, along with more complicated devices such as a bulldozer, 3D printer, and 50kW wind turbine. These can be built from scrap or recycled materials at a fraction of the cost of commercial machinery.

“The basic principle is open hardware – building the machines to cover your basic needs,” OSE spokesman Nikolay Georgiev told The Register. “Basically, it’s about creating a civilization similar to what we have now, but on a smaller scale and all using open hardware.”

OSE Brick maker

This isn’t some kind of idea spawned out of the end-of-civilization-in-2012 angst that is gripping some impressionable minds these days. Rather, it’s an attempt to make basic tools available in areas of the developing world that lack basic amenities, or for folks looking for a more sustainable lifestyle – or, for that matter, to simply to stash tool-building knowledge into the libraries of those who worry about what the future may hold.

The OSE was set up in 2003 by Princeton professor of fusion energy Marcin Jakubowski, who decided to go back to the land and start a farm in Missouri after an insight that he had no actual practical skills.

The Missouri move wasn’t a success, with fragile farm equipment and little experience, so he designed and built tools himself that were reliable, cheap, and simple designs that could be made by hand. The plan was to build tools designed for long life and maximum efficiency, and that cost the minimum to build and run.

While they won’t be winning any beauty contests, Jakubowski’s designs were capable of letting him plant 100 trees or make 5,000 bricks in a day – he even built a working tractor in six days at less than half the cost of a commercial vehicle, even when factoring in $15-per-hour labor costs.

“It’s about a newly relevant DIY maker culture that can hope to transcend artificial scarcity,” he told a recent TED lecture.

Eight basic tools, such as the four-wheel-drive tractor, hydraulic power cube, and brick maker (aka the "Liberator" Compressed Earth Block Press), are finished and the documentation is being finalized, but the team is short around $5m in funding and need more engineers to finish more-complex tools. Some tools, such as the laser cutter and circuit board printer, do seem a little ambitious, but the OSE is concentrating first on getting the basic machinery sorted out.

Compressed Earth Block Press“You have to be able to farm land,” Georgiev explained. “Then you start identifying your needs for a similar life to now and thinking how all technology could be developed. There’s not just one machine that does all things.”

A Kickstarter campaign begun last month has already reached its initial goal, but the campaign is still collecting funds to build a 5,000 square-foot production facility in Missouri, with ten living units for the development team. Documentation for the first eight machines should be online by the end of this year and the team is hoping to crowdsource specialist skills for different devices, with a goal of publishing DIY details for all 50 tools by the end of 2012.

Unfortunately, no machine complex enough to build an actual computer is on the 50-tool list, since the capabilities required are beyond a scheme that's designed to keep smaller units of people alive and in relative comfort.

“It should be possible to apply the principles to computer fabrication, but not for a group on the scale of a village. This is just the first level of the system,” said Georgiev.

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