unemployed and preparing

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cunegund's picture
cunegund
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unemployed and preparing

Hi all. I moved from New York recently to settle in the mid-west. Was unemployed for two years (some temp assignments). Still am after three months of living here. We came b/c my husdands family are here. We were broke in NY and they provided the funds to move and get an apartment.

I have been following peakoil since 2004 and agknowledge system collape. I have been working on inner transition/preparation. have not had the money to purchase the necessities. We live on my husbands small paycheck. Sometimes I think I will never find a permant job ever again. My inlaws speak in terms of this being a temporary situation but I feel, at leas fort people in my position, that this is the new normal. I don't tell them whats on my mind. I feel I am doing a good job in spending wisely and not buying useless things. But there is pressure on me to work and I don't feel especially opimistic. anyone in the same boat? 

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xraymike79
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You're right: This is the New Normal

I have a couple friends who have been out of work for nearly 2 years, both with college degrees and who work in the medical field. One also taught and the other even has 20 years experience as a paramedic before getting his radiologic sciences degree. One lives in Phoenix and the other in San Antonio, both places where you were able to get a job at the drop of a hat before the 2008 meltdown. I don't think there are any career fields that are safe as we descend the net energy cliff. We'll never regain the amount of jobs that have been lost recently. The system seems to be cannibalizing itself for 'growth'. And the number of people over the age of 50+ who have come back into the work force("dying with your boots on") has spiked:

We're living at a time in history where our economic system is collapsing while those benefiting the most at the top of it are trying to hold things together, ignoring all the signs which say that another way is needed if we are to survive. The only true 'capital'(sky, earth, water), upon which everything else we have built, is being destroyed while we chase after bits of paper with dead presidents on them. There are no bail-outs for extinct species, the ravaged ecosystem of our oceans, and a permanently altered biosphere.

While there still are jobs for the lucky few who can find and hold on to them, I think we have to face the reality of a future with less to go around, more political instability and wars, and no safe place to rely on for any kind of "retirement." I will go with Morris Berman's estimate that the road to a 'new system' will take 30 to 50 years, perhaps longer than the remaining lifespan of some who post here.

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RNcarl
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Its not as bad - nor as good as it seems
cunegund wrote:

Hi all. I moved from New York recently to settle in the mid-west. Was unemployed for two years (some temp assignments). Still am after three months of living here. We came b/c my husdands family are here. We were broke in NY and they provided the funds to move and get an apartment.

I have been following peakoil since 2004 and agknowledge system collape. I have been working on inner transition/preparation. have not had the money to purchase the necessities. We live on my husbands small paycheck. Sometimes I think I will never find a permant job ever again. My inlaws speak in terms of this being a temporary situation but I feel, at leas fort people in my position, that this is the new normal. I don't tell them whats on my mind. I feel I am doing a good job in spending wisely and not buying useless things. But there is pressure on me to work and I don't feel especially opimistic. anyone in the same boat? 

Well,

First, welcome. We are glad that you are here. Because if you are here, you recognize that there is "something wrong" but might not quite be able to put your finger on it... right?

It sounds like you moved TO an area where you have family.

I will leave running out the whys of what is going on - to those who love to share them.

What I will tell you is that in my short working life (30+ years) I thought that I would "retire" first at age 55 but when I looked at the required amount of cash-on-hand I would need to do so, revised that UP to 59 1/2. (If you have had an IRA you know why that age was picked). I am now three years away from my first retirement age goal and I realize that neither retirement goal will be "doable." Now, let me share, that part of the reason  I will "die with my boots on" as the saying goes, is because I chose to change courses in my life - a few times. I never realized that by doing so, I may have just saved me and mine from the depression in the future. What I mean is, almost by accident I became more resilient, diversified, and tempered. So, I am, not in the same boat as you, but a boat along side of yours heading down the same river.

OK - what the heck does that have to do with you? You are the one out of work, had to take help from family and now, (I assume) are living away from what you know and are out of your comfort zone. What it has to do with you is this, whether-or-not change was forced upon you or you elect to change, change is hard. Change closes opportunities. Change also provides new opportunities.

Take this time to become "You - incorporated." Realize that you NEVER did work for someone else, you always worked for YOU. Why did you have a "steady job" in the first place? Money, yes? To help provide for your family? Did you work where you did for just the "love of the job?" What skills do you have? What skills do you want? Build - "You" like a business. Build skills that your "customers" (employers) want.

Read - "The Road Less Traveled" by M Scott Peck, MD. The link is to the 25th Anniversary addition. (Showing my age, I read it over twenty years ago) One quote in the book has stood out in my mind for the last twenty plus years:

"Life is difficult. This is a great truth, one of the greatest truths. It is a great truth because once we truly see this truth, we transcend it. Once we truly know that life is difficult—once we truly understand and accept it—then life is no longer difficult. Because once it is accepted, the fact that life is difficult no longer matters."

 Things are difficult. Live, laugh, love, adapt.

 So I leave you with this,

- C.

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PetersBride
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I hear you

 Hi there,

 

I'm unemployed too. When I got word that I would not be returning to my position in the fall (teacher, not tenured), my husband and I made the decision to make a big move to another country, where I had grown up. We could have remained in New England and I could have looked for work, but it would have been very lean times on his salary alone (my salary was larger than his), eventhough we had already paired down our lives by this point. Plus, I feared that with my years of experience and education level, no school system would be keen to hire me as I would be more expensive than a newly minted graduate (this often happens when school budgets are tight). 

We reasoned that since we wanted to move at some point anyway, now was as good a time as any.  It has been five months now and I have not landed a job (although I have come close). I've never been unemployed before so it is a bit unnerving. But, I am also looking at this time as holding the potential for me to go in new directions and perhaps to even find something  that will be in keeping with my new attitude about life and about the world. I am trying to be open to this notion and am beginning to explore my options. I am trying not to think of all of the years I've invested in my education and my profession in negative terms (like, what a waste, for example!). So, you see, you are not alone. 

 

With best regards,

PB

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ao
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PetersBride wrote: We could
PetersBride wrote:

We could have remained in New England and I could have looked for work, but it would have been very lean times on his salary alone (my salary was larger than his), eventhough we had already paired down our lives by this point.

FWIW, it's "pared".  Not to be picayune but when sending out resumes (especially if on paper rather than online), make sure they are flawless in terms of spelling, grammar, neatness, etc.  I would guess this measure is particularly important for a teacher.  The last time I hired, I was appalled at what I observed and experienced.  Spelling errors that should have been picked up with a simple spell check, serious grammatical errors, coffee stains and tomato sauce stains on resumes and cover letters, people answering the phone like the owner of a low life biker bar, the prospective employee screaming at her kids in the background to "SHUT UP, SHUT UP, SHUT UP!!!", slovenly or suggestive appearances, arriving late for an interview, lack of cell phone etiquette, etc.  When I hire someone, attention to detail is one of the traits I look for so, if you haven't already done so, you may want to have someone proof your application materials, try some mock interviews with friends and family, etc.  I realize that even for the most qualified individuals, it's a tough market out there but if you can make yourself stand out in a positive way, it's a plus.  Best of luck. 

PetersBride's picture
PetersBride
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oops

 Hi AO,

 

Thanks for catching the error. I did not have my critical hat on this morning when I wrote the above comment. I do have to think through homophones when writing. I can assure you that I make none of the errors mentioned and would be horrified to send out to a prospective employer anything that was not my best work. 

Cheers, 

PB

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
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spelling
ao wrote:
PetersBride wrote:

We could have remained in New England and I could have looked for work, but it would have been very lean times on his salary alone (my salary was larger than his), eventhough we had already paired down our lives by this point.

FWIW, it's "pared". 

ao, be picayune!  I find the standard of spelling/grammar/syntax on this site (and much of the internet!) appalling.....  In particular, the number of people who don't seem to know the difference between "there" "their" and "they're" is gobsmacking!

Mike

ao's picture
ao
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Damnthematrix wrote: ao
Damnthematrix wrote:
ao wrote:
PetersBride wrote:

We could have remained in New England and I could have looked for work, but it would have been very lean times on his salary alone (my salary was larger than his), eventhough we had already paired down our lives by this point.

FWIW, it's "pared". 

ao, be picayune!  I find the standard of spelling/grammar/syntax on this site (and much of the internet!) appalling.....  In particular, the number of people who don't seem to know the difference between "there" "their" and "they're" is gobsmacking!

Mike

LOL.  We are in total agreement here Mike.  I know I can get sloppy at times but persistently repeated errors can get a bit annoying.  Besides the ones you mentioned, there're "its" and "it's", "you're" and "your", and a whole host of others.  People say spelling doesn't count and close enough is good enough.  I say close only counts in horseshoes and artillery.  If someone is building a precision tool, gun, vehicle, or whatever, I don't think any of us want sloppy. 

cunegund's picture
cunegund
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thanks for the input.

thanks for the input. relocation could be an option in the future. I'm not sure what kind of skills I can contribute to a changing world....one I'm not sure of what it will look like? peak oil, peak food, water. Should I prepare to see more loss and death?

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xraymike79
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Don't Worry, Be Happy
cunegund wrote:

thanks for the input. relocation could be an option in the future. I'm not sure what kind of skills I can contribute to a changing world....one I'm not sure of what it will look like? peak oil, peak food, water. Should I prepare to see more loss and death?

Depends on who you listen to. On our current trajectory, yes more death and loss. I suppose it's simply best to do what you can for yourself and family with the premise that nothing will completely collapse overnight and that this is a "long emergency", meaning that many things will still go on functioning, albeit in a dysfunctional way.

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cunegund
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yes, this is a long

yes, this is a long emergency. there have been early loses but I don't see the media keeping track. I think it will speed up as time goes on. its like a Philip K Dick novel with dual realities. there is what I see and live and what the "others" do.

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xraymike79
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They don't see what I see
cunegund wrote:

yes, this is a long emergency. there have been early loses but I don't see the media keeping track. I think it will speed up as time goes on. its like a Philip K Dick novel with dual realities. there is what I see and live and what the "others" do.

I like that metaphor. You are exactly right and that's really how I feel. I can't really go back to that other world that most live in.

cunegund's picture
cunegund
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Everyone I know here is

Everyone I know here is doing ok............they have jobs or some income, large houses and SUVs. they say things like "you'll get a job soon, one day you'll have a house and a car". with what I have and am experiencing I'm not too sure. I see a future for me where I'm greatful for having food, shelter, the basics. Who knows if I will have medical care when needed? and there are so many people on the planet that are in worse shape and all they have known is deprevation

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a couple of ideas

Welcome cunegund, we're glad your here!

Just a couple of nights ago I was thinking about how much I hate my job and would love to leave it. However, in the same breath, I am blessed to have it, otherwise we wouldn't be able to do the prepping we have done. With everything we've accomplished in the last 2 years I still feel incredibly stressed and pressed for time. Then I thought about people in your situation, who know and understand what's going on, but lack the funds to accomplish preps. What would I do if I were in your position?

Are you able to take a part time position, even temporarily, until you find f/t employment?

Can you practice any gardening skills where you are? Have a couple of chickens? What about a part time farm internship?

When you shop, just buy a couple of extra things at a time. Don't worry about filling a shopping cart. Build your own first aid kit. Go to a thrift store and get a book on first aid, gardening, animal husbandry, etc - or check it out from the local library...

I realize I'm probably telling you things you already know. Have a good day,

 

Rita

 

 

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xraymike79
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Thinking of others before yourself
cunegund wrote:

Everyone I know here is doing ok............they have jobs or some income, large houses and SUVs. they say things like "you'll get a job soon, one day you'll have a house and a car". with what I have and am experiencing I'm not too sure. I see a future for me where I'm greatful for having food, shelter, the basics. Who knows if I will have medical care when needed? and there are so many people on the planet that are in worse shape and all they have known is deprevation

I don't hear that sort of thing much at all in America...Thanks for wearing your heart on your sleeve. 

 

land2341's picture
land2341
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DO you remember in the movie

 After Neo took the red pill and began life in the belly of the beast and was struggling along on lousy nutrition bars and dank cold living fighting for something that seemed extremely unlikely to occur?

 

I feel like that.  Like really while it seems SO obvious that this thing should have fallen and given us a chance for a reset;  it should have fallen and returned to some semblence of something that looks like economic sanity;  yet it does not.  I am tired.  I am tired of waiting and tired of expecting anything to change.  If you give me a disaster I can start to cope with it.  I am very afraid of what this could look like,  but the teetering is getting old.....

 

 

 

Sorry,  I'm feeling very frustrated today with it all.

SingleSpeak's picture
SingleSpeak
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Tangent

 I read, with amusement and fear, the previous posts that pointed out some common annoying grammatical errors found on this site. Then I continued reading the posts that followed. I thought, "How funny these people were by not using capital letters and making some of the mistakes that were just pointed out in the earlier posts." Then I realized that they weren't trying to make a joke. 

In fairness, we all make mistakes when rushing out a quick post, but if you actually preview your comment before posting, you will likely find at least one error. At least eye do.

SS

cunegund's picture
cunegund
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I dont have access to a

I dont have access to a garden. I could start to research on the subjects of animal husbandry, ect. My brain is always tired from job searching, writing cover letters I think will get attention, thinking of what else I can do with a Masters in Library Science. After a while the information does not mean anything. I keep thinking....how much longer will my standard of living stay where it is? its a long emergency and a long problem solving process

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Poet
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Master's In Library Science? Master At Finding Information!

I think there will still be jobs for librarians. But fewer available, so competition will increase, keeping pressure down on available jobs and workers' wages. Here are some of the thoughts I have in that regard:

  • Government and school budget cutbacks are reducing library hours, cutting staff, and closing branches. I'm sure you know all about that.
  • Technology, computerization of records, databases, periodicals and journals. I'm sure you know all about that, too. It's enabled staffing cuts and greater efficiencies. The increasing availability of online sources has reduced the library-going population as well.
  • Every year, more newly minted college graduates with Library Science degrees arrive on the scene than depart into retirement. They have student loan debts, but they are also willing to accept less. (Example: A relative of mine works in a library in another country. She teaches Library Science to graduate students. Every year, her university - one of several that do so - graduates new Library Science majors. But there are only so many libraries in that small country. I believe it reached the saturation point some 20 years ago - with help from technology - but no one's telling the students that. But seeing that back in the mid-1990s made me think about her profession and her students.)
  • Even those without Library Science degrees join in. (Example: A friend of my wife is studying for her Master's in Library Science, but she was hired on full time as a research librarian with a state university library system after getting a Master's in Italian Studies unrelated to her job, then was later promoted to be a supervisor, and now they are paying for her to get her Masters' in Library Science degree.)

So no, I do not know what to say about working in libraries - it is a field of declining employment. You'll be lucky to land a job there. But there are other opportunities. Maybe you can become an archival or on-line database researcher at a private firm or foundation. I bet you have information search skills that are transferable to other careers. That's where I assume you are also looking.

In the meantime, if you aren't already considering it, I would suggest volunteering at a local library to help people and get to know the managers and supervisors there. Also, maybe you can post on Craigslist that you're willing to help people research sources for their papers. People pay $25 to $50 per hour for math or English or science tutoring (I've recently had to interview some math tutors for my wife). I'm sure they'll pay in that range for high-level research skills if they have a major research or term paper coming up.

Poet

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not looking promising

 The Kindle and internet is not helping your job situation .   Unless we have full out SHTF  I do not see this changing  .     You might be better off focusing in another direction.   Hate to burst your bubble but these are tough times and we have to face facts.   If they are not teaching children the love of books and learning  the Library will only be an afterschool homework station .  Actually tutoring might well be what you need to look in to ...  a few parents may pay their last dollar for you to help their children learn to copy and paste .  My daughter gets paid room and board , a car and $2000 a month as a nanny  to do about this same thing .  Drive the kids to and from all their afterschool programs and see their homework is done .    May not be your dream job  but  it is the only way my daughter figured out how to save enough money to go to college .

 

 FM 

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cunegund
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I like the idea of providing

I like the idea of providing research services. I have lots of limitations when it comes to work. No car, dependant on the bus, and yes the reality of tech taking over tasks that librarians used to do. I am looking to volunteer as well.

RNcarl's picture
RNcarl
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Damnthematrix wrote: ao
Damnthematrix wrote:
ao wrote:
PetersBride wrote:

We could have remained in New England and I could have looked for work, but it would have been very lean times on his salary alone (my salary was larger than his), eventhough we had already paired down our lives by this point.

FWIW, it's "pared". 

ao, be picayune!  I find the standard of spelling/grammar/syntax on this site (and much of the internet!) appalling.....  In particular, the number of people who don't seem to know the difference between "there" "their" and "they're" is gobsmacking!

Mike

omg u r kdiing write?

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RNcarl
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Short term vs long term
cunegund wrote:

I like the idea of providing research services. I have lots of limitations when it comes to work. No car, dependant on the bus, and yes the reality of tech taking over tasks that librarians used to do. I am looking to volunteer as well.

OK,

First, you are not a librarian (any more) you have a skill that is, or rather will be in great demand. As Poet says, you know and understand how to "mine" information. As things begin to speed up, companies will look for those folks that know how to dig through the noise of deafening information, categorize and assemble the meaningful from the sublime. That - is the long term.

In the short term, you need to categorize what you do have, what physical things you can do and decide on what you need to accomplish in the short term. You need to do, what you need to do, in order to "make it through."

The '70's were full of graduate degree truck drivers and undergrad grocery baggers. I think the 20-teens will even see more.

Please scour this site and all that it has to offer to you in the way of "how to prepare."  I don't mean the guns, bullets and commando survival skills... at first. Read about the mental tenacity, social skills and community building skills first.

My father was an adult through the "great depression." I used to laugh at his balls made out of rubber bands and the shoe boxes of well used pencils, half used erasers and drawers full of unused return envelopes - Now, I understand. He would repair something instead of replace it. My brothers and I used to think he was just a cheap old man - Now, we know better. His workshop had old tools all placed just so, there were baby food jars full of screws categorized and labeled with their lids screwed to the underside of a make-shift shelf made from an old dresser drawer. He was not a hoarder, nor was he cheap. He was resilient. He knew how to save and he knew how to make due. He learned skills that the rest of us have forgotten in our "just-in-time" disposable lifestyle. One of his greatest skills was that he could talk to anyone, about anything. He was not a college graduate but what he lacked in formal education he mastered in life experience.

It just sucks to be without a job. It sucks to have to "make due."

But, you have enough to have internet access. And, I assume a roof over your head. I hope you live in a relatively safe area and that you have enough food to eat.

I want to cough-up the red pill and take the blue pill. I want things to be "like they always have been." But, from the story I told above, things were not "always like they used to be." Actually, if you look back along the timeline of our countries existence, "like it used to be" has really been a short aberration in our history.

FWIW, C.

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cunegund
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wonderful post RNcarl! My

wonderful post RNcarl! My husband was in the military and he and his father hunt and will teach me hunting and firearms skills. But yes, now I'm practicing emotional control and focus. My husband works so we can make the rent and eat. I am also trying to hook up with like minded people in the area.

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