Tips on buying a Car that makes sense given Crash Course

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Tips on buying a Car that makes sense given Crash Course

1) I have pretty much decided to purchase at an auction. Can't stomach or jusify buying new, especially for any new concept or cutting-edge techonology/electric/hybrid cars with premiums attached. You have to drive like crazy to save enough money to make it worthwhile plus that's assuming you can take advantage of an available tax credit.

I can customize most cars to my liking later.

2) I will likely get the special permit/dealer license and create LLC for the venture. I figure with some solid homework, good due diligence and connections, patience and outsourcing of much of the research and follow-up I can get a 1-3 year old vehicle in great shape and with low mileage for 50%+ off bluebook. For more expensive cars ($50K and up MSRP) that can be a good chunck of money.

3) Am moving to an area in where I'll need to drive through farmland or rough terrain. I may also have to deal with mountains and snow during the winter. I'm pretty sure I'll be hauling stuff back and forth for business and on road trip plus doing the occasional or bulk discount shopping. May even eventually need to tow something once in a while.

4) Some type of full-size or large SUV will be in order but not as big as a Suburban but definitely larger than all these cross-overs and medium sized SUVs you use to see all over surburbia. Some luxury will also be desired plus intelligently chosen worthwhile tech upgrades.

5) Since I don't want to be completely crushed and at the mercy of Peak Oil issues with correspoding gas hikes some type of deisel engine that I can explore making my own biodeisel for, hybrid or high-tech battery option would needed. Regular gas not an option.

I have heard about some new deisel hybrids coming out but that's new and may not be available for the type of SUV I'll need. Plus, anything new and cutting-edge like that would be pricey and possibly be unreliable until tested further. Will explore pure deisel SUVs and perhaps some hybrids. The hybrids that come with the plug-in kits or can be inexpensively converted to them can add tons of mileage. The Prius gets well 100-150+ mpg with the plug-in kit. Wonder how that would work for a large SUV.

It seems like it's premature to explore natural gas or mainstream CNG models.

My transportation needs will require a larger vehicle plus I want some nice features and options. Not a basic or standard equipped model. I'll add and customize after purchase when and where it makes sense. The effrot here will be more worthwhile to me given the higher price tag on the type of car I'm looking for plus savings on gas for a larger vehicle.

Any suggestions on brands, models, engines or unqiue sources to go shopping for good used vehicle at discount prices? My initial price range is between $20-30k with room for me to upgrade and customize later as my budget allows. Used vehicles, especially at auctions or government liquidations, can be acquired at very advantageous price points.

Any thoughts? I know have seen some people here post some super interesting stuff on what they have done in developing their own biodeisel or investing in such a way to counteract gas price hikes. I'm very interested in pursuing both those ideas, especially the biodeisel concept.

Would love some feedback from the community. Thanks in advance!

YE

 

 

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YoungEntrepreneur wrote: The
YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

The Prius gets well 100-150+ mpg with the plug-in kit. Wonder how that would work for a large SUV.

YE, with all due respect, these MPG figures are absolute hooey.  You may want to do a little more research before regurgitating an automaker's ludicrous propaganda.

Just buy a used crew cab pickup with a modified turbocharged diesel and stay away from Chrysler products.

 

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Diesel is key

IMO

 

Not only does it offer 40% better fuel efficency over the smae exact vehicle in a gas engine, but you can make your own fuel.

The best choices for this are clearly the Dodge Cummins combo, or the Ford PowerStroke combo.

There is a wealth of knowledge out there on why each one is both good and bad. I started with a 2007 Chevy Silverado with Duramax which I bought new. Loved the truck, but in order to run B100 I needed to remove the DPF. Newer (2010 +) will run B20, but still have issues with B100.

I went backwards, due primarily to the fact that the 2006 - vehicles did not have the same smog equipment, which made B100 and SVO an easy switch. I currently run a pair of Ford PSDs, an F350 for me and a 2005 Excursion for the wife. They stopped producing the Ex in 2005, and good ones are getting harder to find, however based on what you have said, I would think the Ex is the best bet for you if you are making your own fuel, or running SVO. If not, the extra size makes the D2 fillups a bit painful on the wallet.

 

If you have specific questions, I can try to help. Based on my experience, you will not find what you are looking for in the OP. A 1 - 3 yo vehicle in SUV form and diesel is going to be a very limited market. You are basically looking at german made and much smaller than what you seem to describe.

If you open it up to pickups, you will find a whole lot more, but don't plan on running any SVO, and get ready to make serious changes to get it to run B100. Personally, I don't think it is worth the effort and added cost. Go 2006 or older and save the headaches and some money. These diesels will last 300K miles, so you really shouldn't look at the year the same way you might a typical car.

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 A Mercedes 320 CDi '06E

 A Mercedes 320 CDi '06E or '08ML. The 06 E would be a better bargain for me. The trunk is huge and the fuel economy is much better. A Curt hitch and towing a ton would be OK.

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Re: AO on the plug-in Prius...

Agree that allot of that MPG on the hybrid or electric cars is BS.

However, what I was talking about was not the regular Prius but rather one that comes with a plug-in kit and that is engineered a differently. They are designed to rely more on battery power and only kick into gas mode under certain conditions.

I know one guy that owns one of these specifically and swears he gets over 100 MPG with the plug-in kit. It was also mentioned and featured in a recent documentary called FUEL. Just FYI. 

Get what you mean though, lots of misleading advertising out there.

Of course I don't expect anywhere close to those numbers on a large SUV using similar technology. I just want to do allot better than the 10-15 MPG allot of those larger vehciles get or at least power with a cheaper source of gas, like biodeisel.

A deisel/electric seems like it would be ideal but not too much out there like that, especially for the type of car I'm looking for. Even moreso if I plan to shop at auctions.

Thanks for your input on the used crew cab with a modified turbocharged deisel. Something to consider. Got it, Chryselr sucks! LOL

YE

  

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Re: Tycer and the Mercedes 320 CDi '06E

Thanks for that heads up. I'll check that one out. I've read and heard some very interesting advancements have been made in these technologies by German automakers. I hear they have recently come out or are currently working on some deisel hybrids. Volkwagon in particular I believe.

Your suggestions may be good options for luxury sedans as 2nd cars but I plan to start with likely one car and it'll likely have to be a good-sized SUV or converted pick-up truck given my needs. Later a smaller more fuel efficient car will be a nice complement. Thanks.

YE

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Re: Ready's "Deisel is Key"

Hey Ready,

Thanks for responding. I've perused some of your posts on these subjects. AWESOME INFO!!! You really know your stuff. I still need to go back through those posts for more detail and learning but you really have me going in Deisel's direction , onboard wih the small farm concept and producing your own biodeisel.

I still have tons to learn about this, a budget to create for it and eventually find a good place to implement it (small farm in rural America). if i get the chance I'd love to visit your farm and see how you put your operation together.

Yes, I like Deisel's fuel efficiency plus the fact you can learn to make your own relatively inexpensively. Makes it worthwhile if you have multiple vehicles, generators, boats, etc... to power.

I'll check out the Ford and Dodge combo you suggested.

Yep, it seems I may be looking for a bit older SUVs or trucks. With some luck you can find some with not too much wear and tear. Good maintenance and deisel engines can certainly negate the mileage factor but you never know how the previous owner took care of the car. Either-way, I would plan to upgrade and customize the cars after purchase.

Yeah, I know the type of car I mentioned is a very limited market, especially in SUV form. I've seen some models that fit much of this criteria but that are smaller than I like. I'm thinking Acura MDX size with comparable luxury and technology. I think they are coming out with a hybrid for that model but I'm not looking to buy new and prefer deisel anyway.

Serious changes to the cars may eliminate the cost savings so it'll take something pretty specific that does not involve major overhauls and performance re-engineering. Tough fit I know, but I think still doable.

Agree, I may need to go older models that require minimal conversion and adaptation. Then I can learn to produce my own biodeisel. I can always upgrade on luxury and tech later, as needed.

Kind of funny, it'll pretty much be like creating a custom vehicle by upgrading a previously existing model. It'll take some good shopping around to make it cost efficient but I plan to put an assistant of mine on the job as the Project Manager. If that all works out I may turn this into a little side business or service. Heck, maybe you might want to become a JV Partner, LOL. Who knows?

Thanks a BUNCH for your input Ready. Really dig your stuff! Look forward to running into you more often on the forum. 

YE 

 

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The ML320 is an SUV with a 7200# towing capacity
YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

Thanks for that heads up. I'll check that one out. I've read and heard some very interesting advancements have been made in these technologies by German automakers. I hear they have recently come out or are currently working on some deisel hybrids. Volkwagon in particular I believe.

Your suggestions may be good options for luxury sedans as 2nd cars but I plan to start with likely one car and it'll likely have to be a good-sized SUV or converted pick-up truck given my needs. Later a smaller more fuel efficient car will be a nice complement. Thanks.

YE

The 2008 ML320 is a full size, all-wheel-drive SUV with a 7200# towing capacity and 24 mpg ave with the 3.2 CDi engine. The next series of engines are the Bluetec v6 and require urea to meet CARB requirements, adding complexity .

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Thanks for the heads up on the 2008 ML320 Tycer

I did not know that vehicle came with a deisel engine. Should have know though because German engineering has always been among the leaders in deisel engines and hybrid technology. One of the true top automakers in the world.

Interesting call. I liked a couple of their SUV models but thought they only came in regular gas or gas electric hybrids. If all things are relatively even, I prefer deisel. Also, this partucular model is likely just a tad smaller than I would like. Slightly larger would be perfect.

However, I just read that this car does not pas some states' emissions tests, like CA & NY, but heck, I'm moving out of CA ASAP and don't plan to reside in any state nearly as liberal and goofy as this one, LOL. The perfect weather is just not worth all the downside.

I'll take a closer look at this model and perhaps the next one up and size because this is closer to what I am hoping to find, if not Ready's suggestions from above are pretty good compromises.

I figure one that is 3-5 years at an auction, gov't liquidation or on-line direct owner sale should be had at a pretty good price. 

Appreciate the tip! Thanks.

YE

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options

For what it's worth, I would've thought it much easier and cheaper to redesign one's lifestyle such that NO VEHICLE is needed at all.  Even if it means deciding a move to somewhere different.  That's what we've done.

Come next year when Australia will almost certainly suffer from fuel shortages, we won't need to worry about making fuel (we'll be flat out feeding ourselves!) or maintaining an expensive vehicle when parts and services could become hard to get and/or expensive.  You'd be amazed what you can do without if you sit down and think about it....

Mike

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YoungEntrepreneur
YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

Agree that allot of that MPG on the hybrid or electric cars is BS.

However, what I was talking about was not the regular Prius but rather one that comes with a plug-in kit and that is engineered a differently. They are designed to rely more on battery power and only kick into gas mode under certain conditions.

I know one guy that owns one of these specifically and swears he gets over 100 MPG with the plug-in kit. It was also mentioned and featured in a recent documentary called FUEL. Just FYI. 

YE,

I realized that you weren't talking about a regular Prius.  I was referencing a set-to-debut OEM Prius plug-in that claims to get 128 mpg.

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/news/autoexpressnews/271474/128mpg_prius_plugs_in.html?CMP=NLC-Newsletters&uid=06506f7fc3610dfb874a01ecfe52c994

In all likelihood, a factory tuned and optimized system (with a larger OEM battery pack) will perform better than any aftermarket kit.  Still, no way it'll pull 128 mpg in level continuous driving.

As far as the guy claiming over 100 mpg, I've heard all kind of unrealistic claims about mpg.  I have an offer for him though.  I'll make him a $1000 bet that if I give him 1 gallon of gas, he won't be able to drive more than 100 miles in level continuous driving ... unless he has a helluva tailwind.;-)   

Here's a little number I'm planning on getting though since roads could be blocked, bridges could be out, etc. ... the Icon A5 ... sweet. 

http://www.iconaircraft.com/

 

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Damnthematrix- regarding car or no car

Yep, actually thought about that but just can't see it. Don't want to give up the freedom and autonomy one affords plus the costs of car to me are heavily compensated for by the advantages. The type of car I plan to get should afford me several lifestyle advantges and flexibility plus wil have business utility and play a role in cost savings in other fronts.

Being from L.A. not having a car is just so foreign to me.

I just need to plan around creating my own fuel, improving performance and fuel efficiency, keeping maintenance up and understanding basic repairs and have some spare parts in storage just in case. Thanks.

YE  

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AO- how funny, what a coincidence on the Icon A5...

Dude that is such a cool plane. Been dreaming about that for over a year. What I don't like is that it's primarily for recreational use and short trips plus only a two seater. Also, the wait list is long and delivery time now is 3-4 years out unless you have already reserved the limited edition version.

I plan to get my license and buy a plane as soon as I can afford it but I will likely be looking for a 4 seater that can make longer trips and go faster. Amphibious is nice but not essential.

A couple interesting plane concepts are...

http://www.seawind.net/   (another new cutting-edge amphibious plane, more industrious and faster than the A5 but pricier and not as fleixble or cool)

http://www.terrafugia.com/   (a flying car, the Jetsons in real life, pretty neat)

Seemingly awesome plane concepts. However, I doubt I buy a new one. Tough on the budget and untested. Also hard to stomach paying full retail when there are so many great slightly used planes available at excellent prices. Imagine as the next recession/greater depression hits. There wil be firesales for them just like small yachts. Smoking deals then.

My interest in private aviation goes way beyond recreational use. It's really a business and travel tool that would be meant to enhance my personal freedom. It would allow me to act and move more discreetly and quickly in response to events while covering large distances in a short amount of time. I can't stand dealing with airports and commercial airlines ever since 9/11, especially in big cities.

It's just such a huge cash drain. Buying the damn thing is only the beginning. Only makes sense if you have cash to burn or plan to use it ALLOT for real functional purposes. Utilty must be truly compelling and practical. It think it will be for me once I legitimately afford it.

Regarding the Prius, agreed, allot gets exagerrated with those hydrid and fuel cell car claims but even if the plug-in approached anywhere near 100 mpg it's a major accomplishment and will be very attractive to commuters.

Check out the documentary "FUEL". I think you'll dig it. Making your own biodeisel and that plug-in prius are both covered there. I'd rather purchase a used deisel engine powered car and learn how to make my own deisel.

I may PM you about the Icon though, just to see what your thoughts are on that. Would love to touch base with another aspriing pilot. Keep in touch. Thanks.

YE

 

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DTM is right

Drive as less as possible. Adapt your life to that. One of the important changes in lifestyle post-peak.

However, there is nothing wrong to own a car and use it seldom. My choice would be the simplest type that can be maintained with the average tools you already have. Carburettor type, no electronics. Perhaps the older diesels. You might add a donor car for parts.

Why buy a new expensive car now, when there might come a time that they can be had for free? A car is the ultimate representative for the present world problems. Often bought with a loan, it is made of and consumes fossile fuels, it stands for somewhat excessive consumerism and is not very sustainable. How recognizable...

Mind you, I love cars. But I do not neccesarily drive a lot in them.

Regards, DJ

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Cars and other thoughts.
YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

Yep, actually thought about that but just can't see it. Don't want to give up the freedom and autonomy one affords plus the costs of car to me are heavily compensated for by the advantages. The type of car I plan to get should afford me several lifestyle advantges and flexibility plus wil have business utility and play a role in cost savings in other fronts.

Being from L.A. not having a car is just so foreign to me.

I just need to plan around creating my own fuel, improving performance and fuel efficiency, keeping maintenance up and understanding basic repairs and have some spare parts in storage just in case. Thanks.

YE  

 

YE,

On this site, there is no consensus about the damage that civilization is inflicting on the planet and whether or not that is sustainable.  Hence the vitreol on climate chance and the like.

There is consensus on CM.com that declining energy and economic structure is not sustainable.

Living in a world where two (or possibly all three of the above) are believed to be likely, I would urge you not become involved in the motoring/flying vision at all.  And if you do choose to do so, do it in the least way possible.

I tell my step children ( Who are recent college graduate ages) that if they can keep the lifestyle that they are used to from being in college, they will be way better off on the future.  Right now, they dont expect to have a lot of extra money to buy frivolous stuff and dont have an idea of the high life.  I urge them to stay there  and make a fulfilling life at a low level. Live under your means.

I can tell you as someone who, thru the blindness of my generation, followed the path of career, too big home, car and single engine plane, it is not a sustainable path for the future and it never was.  As such, it is pretty much a complete waste of time and human energy.

I think it is hard to start down that path and then choose to give it up.  Most people will not and will fight to keep business as usual.

A car?  Maybe if it was a small, basic one.  It would take a lot of planning and dedication to be car-less in the US.  I use a VW Jetta Wagon running on Bio-Diesel.  And I still use it as sparingly as I can.  If I could figure out a way to not have one, I would.

A plane? No way on earth.  I owned a plane for years.  They are a huge pain (due to maintenance), energy intensive, costly  and not a very reliable method of transport(Weather, Maintenance).  Way oversold from a marketing perspective.

 

 

 

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Dutch John...I get what you mean

I've thought about that but there's so many things in between now and when the crash may take place that I'll need a car for that it seems necessary, even advantageous despite some of the downsides.

It's not like I'm looking to buy a new sports car, but rather a deisel engine powered used SUV at auction that I can produce my own fuel for, haul and tow things with and traverse all types of terrain. More of an industrious use. Paying cash as well.

Good point about cars loaded with electronics. That could present real problems later. 

Yes, eventually owning a small farm in an area that is more or less sustainable is the goal but I can't see a good crew cab conversion or all-weather 4x4 SUV not being part of that picture.

Appreciate the input though. Thanks.

YE

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Re: jtturbo68 Cars and other thoughts...

jtturbo68,

Good thoughts and advice. Points to ponder.

An industrious mult-purpose vehicle seems like more a tool to me than just a liability but I understand the argument. I think if you buy right (liek at auction), choose the right vehicle (deisel engine multi-purpose vehicle) and plan around gas and maintenace (make your own biodesiel, keep spare parts, know how ot handle basic maintenance), I think the car purchase is well justified.

I agree, the plane is definitely debatable. Just a huge desire but only because of its business, travel and private transportation utility. Not really for recreational use. Irregardless, even if pruchased well the maintenance is a pain in the butt.

I understand living below your means and keeping a low consumer profile. Will definitely do that as much as possible. However, there are some things I really want to do and have. I would rather spend more time thinking about how I can make and hang onto to more money so I can afford them as opposed to not having them at all by being a miser and not maintaining enough liquidity or owning enough streams of income.

I think tax, investment and asset protection strategies can go a long way there in conjunction with building multiple streams of income that are automated, employ well-leveraged labor, project target ahread of trends and that still allow for great personal time, travel and movement freedom. This can be accomplished. I've seen others (although few) do it.

VW makes good deisel models and I like the idea of making your own biodeisel.

I agree about the downside of planes and boats. Very scary and they can be serious money pits, especially if you primarily use them for recreation. My interest in either, primairly a plane, is largely for reasons other than recreation. However, still a tough pill to swallow. I'll only do it once the costs of purchasing and maintaining one are only a small fraction of my liquids reserves and monthly income (definitely less than 10%).

Certainly a decision that needs to be well though-out. Appreciate your thoughts. Helps to make me pause before I leap. Thanks.

YE 

 

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time for a reboot methinks
YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

I've thought about that but there's so many things in between now and when the crash may take place that I'll need a car for that it seems necessary, even advantageous despite some of the downsides.

I believe very few people understand the repercussions of what is coming..... and I don't think you do.  You say you are young.  How young?  If you are under 30, you have never known frugality, cars have ALWAYS been part of your lifestyle (we didn't own a car until I was about nine years old...) and you know no other way.  You say you are from California... and what makes you think California will be any different from anywhere else?  In fact, I think that because California (been there) is designed exclusively around the car it will suffer even more than most other places....

It's all very well to say you'll make your own fuel, but I know people who do this and they don't have much time for anything else.  You'd be much better off to spend your energies into growing some food and establishing sustainable ways of doing so such that you do NOT need to drive anywhere to get your fertilisers and seeds and other inputs to survive,  I currently only drive a car because I still can.  Should oil production stop tomorrow, yes I would miss it for maybe four days, but it would not impact the way I live that much because I have already planned our lives this way....  and you better believe that it takes YEARS to learn to become self sufficient.

YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

It's not like I'm looking to buy a new sports car, but rather a deisel engine powered used SUV at auction that I can produce my own fuel for, haul and tow things with and traverse all types of terrain. More of an industrious use. Paying cash as well.

I used to own a small SUV... bought it to build my house so I could tow a trailer with cement mixer, timber, etc etc.  It was a 1.6L 4 cyl Lada Niva that I could get 30+ MPG from and fix with chewing gum and fencing wire.  I eventually decommissioned it but kept it to "haul and tow things with and traverse all types of terrain" on the property....  it NEVER happened.  If you don't use a car much, rubber seals in the hydraulics perish (yes I know it's a Russian piece of crap..) and rats start nesting in it, and before you know it, the battery's flat, and it won't start and the brakes don't work, and and and.... it all gets too hard and a waste of time.  And precious money.

YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

Good point about cars loaded with electronics. That could present real problems later.

In my experience, electronics are far far more reliable than mechanivcal things.  I've driven electronic cars to mileages beyond 250,000 miles with virtually zero problems.

YoungEntrepreneur wrote:

Yes, eventually owning a small farm in an area that is more or less sustainable is the goal but I can't see a good crew cab conversion or all-weather 4x4 SUV not being part of that picture.

IMO......  you should really rethink this.  Sit down and look at your priorities.  Uninterruptible solar power supply would be way above any car on my list of things to do.  Just pumping water is far more important than moving things around the place.... water is very heavy.  I use a $100 hand cart to move hay and manure all over my farm.  It keeps you fit to boot!

Mike

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DMT- (time for a reboot) you know what they say about assuming

Thanks DMT. Challenges my thinking. Some of it really helps.

1) In my early 30's so still relatively young.

2) Guess again, grew up in real poverty. Middle class would have been luxury to me. Was that way all the way though college (paid, worked and borrowed my way through) and up to a few years afer college. I can appreciate frugality.

3) From California but moving soon to a more rural area somewhat close to a major city. 

4) Agreed, much of California is primed to be a total disaster when the STHF. If you ask me you're better off completely outside the US. Some select countries are very desriable alternatives. I'm working on that too.

5) Agreed on priorities for food, water, energy and sustainable practices. I absolutely plan to incorporate those. More important than a car but I need a car before moving and beginning that process.

6) Guess again, again. No way I plan on doing all this by myself and spending all my time farming, producing gas, working on energy projects, etc... I will outsource what I can and have oniste assistants or employess that will handle this for me. That's why I plan a purchase a mulit-acre property and build employee and gues houses as necessary. I understand outsourcing and multiple forms of leverage. I'll focus on making money and learning certain high value critical skills. With liquidity and income coming in I can always hire others for the rest and offer them food and shelter as perks to recruiting good help. There are way to do ALL of this quite affrodably. Prefab Housing, Strategic Productive Land purchases, Virtual Assistants, young employess, interns, foreign labor, currency arbitrage, automated systems and processes, etc... Not thinking conventionally and leveraging my time and efforts several ways.

Sorry to break it to you, but I'm not a "do it yourself" type of dude and have to constantly assess strengths and weaknesses so as to allocate best allocation of time and resources. Outside the box brother.

7) Yes, the car purchase and utility have to be planned in order to identify best and highest use. That's what I;m doing now.

8) Money always seems more prescious when you really struggle to earn it. Been there, done that. It still needs to be respected and valued but the "scarcity mindset" needs to go. Once you learn how to earn it several ways and make it sustainable then you can practice how to hang onto more of it but do not have to fear employing it where it makes sense.

9) Interesting thought about electronics on cars. I always thought the more electronics, the more potential problems. I definitely would not know how to fix that and do not want to learn. Perhaps one of my employees would need to be highly skilled in auto maintenance amoung other things. 

10) Totally agree, water and solar are super important. I also plan to incorporate Deisel generators. Yes, high value.

Living a sustainable life is a real challenge. You're right, it could take several years but that's why I am going to school on that now plus I do not plan to do this myself. I will focus on my core competencies and strengths, choose carefully where I spend my time and then inteliigently outsource and leverage my time and efforts.

Choosing where you live, the type of property you buy and what types of businesses you operate is crucial.

I'm not chained to job, geographic location, national affiliation, family obligations, social commitments or really much of anything. Remain liquid and as moble as possible, adapt, survive and thrive.

Whenever I want to involve something in my life I think about how it fits within my overall plan. If I want it bad enough what am I willing to sacrifice or do to involve it, afford it and/or care for it if necessary. This could be people or things. There's give and take and risk in everything. It's about conducting yor own cost benefit analysis.

Thanks.

YE  

     

jturbo68's picture
jturbo68
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 4 2009
Posts: 207
It depends on what you are preparing for

YE,

 

I think it depends on what you are preparing for.  My preparations over time have grown to include the desire to grow my own food, fuel and household energy.  If we only have a relatively minor breakdown of our current way of life, then these things will only have value if they also create a better standard of life as I am doing them.

If thing fall farther and faster, hopefully I have expanded options.

As I read your posts, my impression is that you dont really expect a fast or deep decline which moves faster than you can adapt.  As such, you take as an assumption that you can gain access to fairly large quantities of diesel/biodiesel to power your home and travels. Also that there is enough capacity for people to want to sell it ot trade it to you. It is of course possible that you are correct.  But that kind of decline is more of an inconvenience regardless of whether or not you have prepared for it.

A steeper decline may have you unable to gain access to fuel at all, or maybe very small amounts.  Being in a position to do well in that environment is a more useful prep, but takes longer to accomplish. 

I tend to think that when the decline becomes more widely known/accepted, we will be in stiff competition for most lifes essentials with people who have either deeper pockets (who can outbid us for commodities) or desparate people who will try to take what they feel they need.

 

As Chris says, better to be a year to early to the game than a day late.  I agree with that and try to let it guide.

 

 

 

 

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
my view of the future...

If your assumption that the crash may be slow is correct, you may be OK.  But if you are wrong (as I expect) and the above scenario pans out, you will not have time to think!

It's taken us seven years to get to where we are in preparations.  And I might add, I wish we were even more ready.  I'm 25 yrs older than you, and that doesn't help, and we did everything on a shoestring, and maybe we could've done better faster had we been younger and wealthier...  but if you want my opinion, you and 6 billion other people are fast running out of time.

Mike

jturbo68's picture
jturbo68
Status: Silver Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 4 2009
Posts: 207
Graph
Damnthematrix wrote:

If your assumption that the crash may be slow is correct, you may be OK.  But if you are wrong (as I expect) and the above scenario pans out, you will not have time to think!

It's taken us seven years to get to where we are in preparations.  And I might add, I wish we were even more ready.  I'm 25 yrs older than you, and that doesn't help, and we did everything on a shoestring, and maybe we could've done better faster had we been younger and wealthier...  but if you want my opinion, you and 6 billion other people are fast running out of time.

Mike

 

DTM,

Where can one find the source materials to go along with that graph?

 

 

Damnthematrix's picture
Damnthematrix
Status: Diamond Member (Offline)
Joined: Aug 10 2008
Posts: 3998
YoungEntrepreneur's picture
YoungEntrepreneur
Status: Bronze Member (Offline)
Joined: Jun 9 2011
Posts: 86
DTM: I never said the crash was going to be real slow...

I definitely came to this party late. Wish I would have stumbled upon and explored much of this information years ago instead of discovering and learning most of it within the past 12-18 months.

I liquidated most of my possesions, started new mobile business ventures and am moving to an area more suitable for Crash Course preps and survival.

Only way I'm going to be able to catch-up is by employing leverage (people's time, expertise, energy and effort). Generating more income will allow for that. It would take forever if I did it all myself, went at it alone and tried to learn and absorb everything on my own.

Predicting how fast this will deteriorate is difficult but there should be a major system shock (something life changing for most folks) sometime within the next 3-5 years. Could happen sooner depending on how effective and aggressive the gov't is with their extend and pretend tactics and how gullible and susceptible to lies and deception the American people are.

We're on the same side, just somewhat arguing semantics. Thanks for your input.

YE 

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